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A collection of old ballads. Corrected from the best and most ancient copies extant... [2nd ed] [ESTC N938]

DMI number:
529
Publication Date:
1723
Volume Number:
1 of 3
ESTC number:
N938
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW112582424
Shelfmark:
BL c.108.bb.33
Full Title:
A | COLLECTION | OF OLD | BALLADS. | Corrected from the best and most | Ancient COPIES Extant. | WITH | INTRODUCTIONS | HISTORICAL, CRITICAL, | or HUMOROUS. | [rule] | [i]Illustrated with[/i] COPPER PLATES. | [rule] | [epigraph] | [rule] | [i]The[/i] SECOND EDITION. | [rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed for [i]J. Roberts[/i], and [i]D. Leach[/i]; and sold by | [i]J. Brotherton[/i] in [i]Cornhill[/i]; [i]A. Bettesworth[/i] in [i]Pater- | Noster-Row; J. Pemberton[/i] in [i]Fleetstreet[/i]; [i]J. Wood- | man[/i] in [i]Bowstreet, Covent-Garden[/i]; and [i]J. Stag[/i] in | [i]Westminster-Hall.[/i] M DCC XXIII.
Epigraph:
[i]Let no nice Sir despise the hapless Dame, | Because Recording[/i] BALLADS [i]chaunt her Name. | Those Venerable Ancient[/i] Song-Enditers | [i]Soar'd many a Pitch above our modern Writers. | With rough Majestick Force they mov'd the Heart, | And Strength and Nature made amends for Art.[/i] | ROWE. |
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Duodecimo
Pagination:
pp.[2], [i]-viii, [2], [1]-286, [1].
Bibliographic details:
Bookplates of Lord Gray and C. H. Wilkinson.
Comments:
QUERY: when hard copy is checked, missing page refs for plates need to be supplied. CONTENTS: Poems introduced by short essays. PLATES: Frontispiece signed J. Pine, and engravings facing pp. 1, 18, 23, 37, 64, 90, 108, 145, 170, 195, 199, 211, 221, 227, 249, 275 (all unsigned). MISCELLANY GENRE: Miscellany of ballads.
Other matter:
PREFATORY MATERIALS: Preface pp.[i]-viii; Table of Ballads [2pp.]. BACKMATTER: Advertisement at close of volume for forthcoming second volume of 'A Collection of old Ballads.' (1pp.)
References:
Case, 326 (1) (b)
Related Miscellanies
Title:
A collection of old ballads. Corrected from the best and most ancient copies extant. [T117410]
Publication Date:
1723
ESTC No:
T117410
Volume:
1 of 3
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
A collection of old ballads. Corrected from the best and most ancient copies extant. [3rd ed] [ESTC N939]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
N939
Volume:
1 of 3
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
A collection of old ballads. Corrected from the best and most ancient copies extant. [Vol II] [2nd ed] [ESTC T144721]
Publication Date:
1726
ESTC No:
T144721
Volume:
2 of 3
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
A collection of old ballads. Corrected from the best and most ancient copies extant. [Vol III] [2nd ed] [ESTC N395]
Publication Date:
1738
ESTC No:
N395
Volume:
3 of 3
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
A collection of old ballads. Corrected from the best and most ancient copies extant... Vol. III. [N941]
Publication Date:
1725
ESTC No:
N941
Volume:
3 of 3
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
A collection of old ballads. Corrected from the best and most ancient copies extant. [Vol III] [ESTC N940]
Publication Date:
1725
ESTC No:
N940
Volume:
3 of 3
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Related People
Author:
J. Stagg
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
'sold by... J. Stag': ESTC N938
Editor:
Ambrose Philips
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
ESTC: Compilation usually attributed to Ambrose Philips.
Publisher:
J[ames] Roberts
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
'Printed for J. Roberts': ESTC N938
Sold by:
J. Pemberton
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
'sold by... J. Pemberton': ESTC N938
Publisher:
D. Leach
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
'Printed for... D. Leach': ESTC N938
Sold by:
Arthur Bettesworth
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
'sold by... A. Bettesworth': ESTC N938
Sold by:
J. Brotherton
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
'sold by J. Brotherton': ESTC N938
Engraver:
John Pine
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
Sold by:
J. Woodman
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
'sold by... J. Woodman': ESTC N938
Content/Publication
First Line:
Sweet youthful charming ladies fair
Page No:
pp.1-10
Poem Title:
I. The Unfortunate Concubine; or, Rosamond's Overthrow: Occasion'd by her Brother's unadvisedly praising her Beauty to Two young Knights of Salisbury, as they rid on the Road. To the Tune of The Court Lady.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
When as King Henry ruled this land
Page No:
pp.11-17
Poem Title:
II. A Lamentable Ballad of Fair Rosamond, King Henry the Second's Concubine.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Queen Eleanor was a sick woman
Page No:
pp.18-22
Poem Title:
III. Queen Eleanor's Confession to the Two supposed Fryars of France.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Why should we boast of Arthur and his knights
Page No:
pp.23-27
Poem Title:
IV. St. George and the Dragon.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Now of the seven champions here
Page No:
pp.28-36
Poem Title:
V. The Seven Champions of Christendom. Being a Compendious History of their Lives and Actions, &c. To the Tune of The Christian Warriors.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Old stories tell how Hercules
Page No:
pp.37-42
Poem Title:
VI. An Excellent Ballad of a most dreadful Combat, fought between Moore of Moore-Hall, and the Dragon of Wantley.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
In elder time there was of yore
Page No:
pp.43-52
Poem Title:
VII. King Alfred and the Shepherd. With the Humours of Gillian, the Shepherd's Wife. To the Tune of Flying Fame.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Henry our royal king would ride a hunting
Page No:
pp.53-58
Poem Title:
VIII. A pleasant Ballad of King Henry the IId, and the Miller of Mansfield: Shewing how he was entertain'd and Lodg'd at the Miller's House. To the Tune of The French Levalto, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
When as our royal king came home from Nottingham
Page No:
pp.58-63
Poem Title:
The Second Part of the King and the Miller.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Kind gentlemen will you be patient a while
Page No:
pp.64-74
Poem Title:
IX. The Pedigree, Education, and Marriage of Robin Hood, with Clorinda, Queen of Titbury Feast: Supposed to be related by the Fiddler, who play'd at their Wedding.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
When Robin Hood was about twenty years old
Page No:
pp.75-82
Poem Title:
X. Robin Hood, and Little John. Being an Account of their first Meeting, their fierce Encounter, and Conquest. To which is added, Their Friendly Agreement; And how he came to be call'd Little John. To the Tune of Arthur a Bland.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
In Nottingham there lives a jolly tanner
Page No:
pp.83-89
Poem Title:
XI. Robin Hood and the Tanner: Or, Robin Hood met with his Match. To the Tune of Robin Hood and the Stranger.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
When Robin Hood in the green wood stood
Page No:
pp.90-96
Poem Title:
XII. Robin Hood Rescuing Will. Stutley, from the Sheriff and his Men, who had taken him Prisoner, and were going to hang him, &c. To the Tune of, Robin Hood and Queen Catherine.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
When Edward was in England king
Page No:
pp.97-107
Poem Title:
XIII. A Warning Piece to England, against Pride and Wickedness: Being the Fall of Queen Eleanor, Wife to Edward the First, King of England; who, for her Pride, by God's Judgments, sunk into the Ground at Charing-Cross, and rose at Queen-Hithe. To the Tune of, Gentle and Courteous.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
She was a woman prudent wise in councils
Page No:
p.101
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
God prosper long our noble king
Page No:
pp.108-119
Poem Title:
XIV. An Unhappy Memorable Song of the Hunting in Chevy-Chace, between Earl Piercy of England, and Earl Douglas of Scotland. To the Tune of Flying Fame.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Two noble dukes of great renown
Page No:
pp.120-129
Poem Title:
XV. The Banishment of the Dukes of Hereford and Norfolk, in the Time of King Richard the Second.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Here must I tell the praise
Page No:
pp.130-137
Poem Title:
XVI. Sir Richard Whittington's Advancement. Being An Historical Account of his Education, unexpected Fortune, Charity, &c. To the Tune of, Dainty come thou to me.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
A king once reigned beyond the seas
Page No:
pp.138-144
Poem Title:
XVII. Cupid's Revenge. Or, An Account of a King who slighted all Women, and at length was constrain'd to marry a Beggar, who prov'd a Fair and Virtuous Queen. To the Tune of, I often for my Jenny strove.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
He despised the sweetest beauty
Page No:
p.139
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Her fame through all the realms did ring
Page No:
p.140
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
If Rosamond that was so fair
Page No:
pp.145-152
Poem Title:
The Woeful Lamentation of Jane Shore, a Goldsmith's Wife in London, sometime King Edward the Fourth's Concubine. To the Tune of Live with me, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Why should we boast of Laius and his knights
Page No:
pp.153-158
Poem Title:
King Edward and Jane Shore. In Imitation, and to the Tune of, St. George and the Dragon.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
When Flora with her fragrant flowers
Page No:
pp.159-169
Poem Title:
A True Relation of the Death of Sir Andrew Barton, a Pyrate and Rover on the Sea. To the Tune of Come follow my Love.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Is there ever a man in all Scotland
Page No:
pp.170-174
Poem Title:
XX. Johnny Armstrong's last Good-night, shewing how John Armstrong with his Eightscore Men fought a bloody Battle with the Scotch King at Edenborough. To a Northern Tune.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
As it fell out one Whitsunday
Page No:
pp.175-180
Poem Title:
XXII. A pleasant Ballad shewing how two valiant Knights, Sir John Armstrong, and Sir Michael Musgrave, fell in Love with the Beautiful Daughter of the Lady Dacres in the North; and of the great Strife that happen'd between them for her, and how they wrought the Death of One hundred Men.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
In the days of old
Page No:
pp.181-187
Poem Title:
XXIII. An Excellent Ballad of a Prince of England's Courtship to the King of France's Daughter, and how the Prince was disasterously slain, and the aforesaid Princess was afterwards marry'd to a Forrester. To the Tune of, Crimson Velvet.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
In the west of England
Page No:
pp.188-194
Poem Title:
XXIV. The Life and Death of the famous Thomas Stukely an English Gallant in the Time of Queen Elizabeth, who ended his Life in a Battle of three Kings of Barbary. To the Tune of, King Henry's going to Bulloign, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Come sound up your trumpets and beat up your drums
Page No:
pp.195-198
Poem Title:
XXV. Queen Elizabeth's Champion. Or, A Victory obtain'd by the Young Earl of Essex, over the Old Emperor of Germany, by Sea; in which he took the Emperor's Son, and brought him Prisoner to Queen Elizabeth.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Of a worthy London prentice
Page No:
pp.199-203
Poem Title:
XXVI. The Honour of a London 'Prentice. Being an Account of his matchless Manhood and brave Adventures done in Turkey, and by what Means he marry'd the King's Daughter, &c. To the Tune of, All you that love good Fellows, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
As I to Ireland did pass
Page No:
pp.204-210
Poem Title:
XXVII. The true Lovers Knot unty'd: Being the right Path whereby to advise Princely Virgins how to behave themselves, by the Example of the Renowned Princess, the Lady Arabella, and the Second Son of the Lord Seymour, late Earl of Hertford. To the Tune of Frog's Galliard, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Cold and raw the North did blow
Page No:
pp.211-215
Poem Title:
XXVIII. The Northern Ditty: Or, The Scotchman outwitted by the Country Damsel. To a new Scoth [sic] Tune.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
You beauteous ladies great and small
Page No:
pp.216-220
Poem Title:
XXIX. The famous Flower or Serving-Men: Or, The Lady turn'd Serving-Man. To the Tune of Flora's Farewell: Or, Summertime: Or, Love's Tide.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Now ponder well you parents dear
Page No:
pp.221-226
Poem Title:
XXX. The Children in the Wood: Or, The Norfolk Gentleman's last Will and Testament. To the Tune of, Rogero, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
In the west of Devonshire
Page No:
pp.227-230
Poem Title:
XXXI. The Devonshire Nymph: Or The Knight's happy Choice. Shewing how a young rich Knight fell in Love with the Daughter of a poor Weaver of Devonshire, and for her Beauty and Virtue marry'd her. To the Tune of, Tender Hearts of London City.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Let Rufus weep rejoice stand sit or walk
Page No:
p.228
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Come mourn come mourn with me
Page No:
pp.231-235
Poem Title:
XXXII. The Bride's Burial. To the Tune of, The Lady's Fall, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Look you faithful lovers
Page No:
pp.236-243
Poem Title:
XXXIII. The unfortunate Love of a Lancashire Gentleman, and the hard Fortune of a fair young Bride. To the Tune of, Come follow my Love, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Mark well my heavy doleful tale
Page No:
pp.244-248
Poem Title:
XXXIV. A Lamentable Ballad of the Lady's Fall. To the Tune of In Pescod Time, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Lord Thomas he was a bold forester
Page No:
pp.249-251
Poem Title:
XXXV. A Tragical Ballad on the unfortunate Love of Lord Thomas and fair Ellinor, together with the Downfal of the Brown Girl.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
A noble marquis
Page No:
pp.252-260
Poem Title:
XXXVI. An excellent Ballad of a Noble Marquis and Patient Grissel. To the Tune of, The Bride's Good-morrow, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
You dainty dames so finely framed
Page No:
pp.261-265
Poem Title:
XXXVII. A Godly Warning to all Maidens, by the Example of God's Judgments shew'd on Jerman's Wife of Clifton in the County of Nottingham, who lying in Child-Bed, was borne away, and never heard of afterwards. To the Tune of The Lady's Fall, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
A wonder stranger ne'r was known
Page No:
pp.266-270
Poem Title:
XXXVIII. The Suffolk Miracle: Or, A Relation of a Young Man, who a Month after his Death appear'd to his Sweetheart, and carry'd her on Horseback behind him for forty Miles in two Hours, and was never seen after but in his Grave. To the Tune of, My bleeding Heart.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Gilderoy was a bonny boy
Page No:
pp.271-274
Poem Title:
XXXIX. The Scotch Lover's Lamentation: Or, Gilderoy's last Fare-well.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Where gottest thou the Haver-mill bonack
Page No:
pp.275-277
Poem Title:
Xl. Bonny Dundee: Or, Jockey's Deliverance Being the Valiant Escape from Dundee, and the Parson's Daughter, whom he had mow'd. To an Excellent Tune, call'd, Bonny Dundee.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Come sweet lass
Page No:
pp.278-280
Poem Title:
XLI. Slighted Jocky: Or, Coy Moggy's unspeakable Cruelty.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Twas in the month of May Jo
Page No:
pp.281-283
Poem Title:
XLII. Jockey and Jenny: Or, The Yielding Maid. Set by Mr. Daniel Purcel.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
First Line:
Though Jockey sued me long he met disdain
Page No:
pp.284-285
Poem Title:
XLIII. Jockey's Courtship. A Scotch Song
Attribution:
by a Person of Quality.
Attributed To:
First Line:
Upon my way from Fife to Aberdeen
Page No:
pp.286-287
Poem Title:
XLIV. The Scotch Lass's Complaint for the loss of her Maidenhead.
Attribution:
Attributed To: