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The minor poets or the works of the most celebrated authors [vol 1] [N6033]

DMI number:
790
Publication Date:
1751
Volume Number:
1 of 2
ESTC number:
N6033
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW117172651
Shelfmark:
BL RB.23.a.6443
Full Title:
THE | MINOR POETS: | OR, THE | WORKS | OF THE MOST | Celebrated AUTHORS, | Of whose WRITINGS there are but | small Remains, [i]Viz.[/i] | [2 cols] [col. 1]The Earl of ROSCOMMON, | The Earl of DORSET, | The Earl of HALLIFAX, | Sir SAMUEL GARTH, | GEORGE STEPNEY, Esq;[/col. 1] [col. 2]WILLIAM WALSH, Esq; | THOMAS TICKELL, Esq; | THOMAS SPRAT, Bishop | of [i]Rochester[/i].[/col2] | In TWO VOLUMES. | [i]DUBLIN:[/i] | Printed for P. WILSON, J. EXSHAW, J. ESDALL, | R. JAMES, S. PRICE, and M. WILLIAMSON. | [rule] | M DCCLI.
Place of Publication:
Dublin
Genres:
Collection of 17th century verse and Collection of literary verse
Format:
Duodecimo
Pagination:
[8], [3]-[400] (p.312 mispaginated '213')
Bibliographic details:
sigs. F12r-v are a cancel, pasted in. Sections have separate title pages: p. 1: [rule] | POEMS | BY THE | EARL [i]of[/i] ROSCOMMON. | [rule] p. 47: [rule] | [i]HORACE[/i]'s | ART [i]of[/i] POETRY. | [rule] p. 69: [rule] | POEMS | BY THE | EARL [i]of[/i] DORSET. | [rule] p. 93: [rule] | POEMS | BY THE | EARL [i]of[/i] HALLIFAX. | [rule] p. 121: [rule] | THE | HIND [i]and the[/i] PANTHER | Transvers'd to the Story of the | [i]Country-Mouse[/i] and the [i]City-Mouse.[/i] | [rule] | [epigraph] | [rule] | Written in Conjunction with Mr. [i]Prior[/i]. | [rule] p. 153: [rule] | THE | WORKS | OF | Sir [i]SAMUEL GARTH[/i] | [rule] p. 155: [rule] | THE | DISPENSARY. | A POEM | IN | SIX CANTO'S. | [epigraph] | [rule] p. 231: [rule] | [i]CLAREMONT. | Address'd to the Right Honourable the | EARL [i]of[/i] CLARE, | NOW | DUKE [i]of[/i] NEWCASTLE. | [rule] | [epigraph] | [rule] p. 317: [rule] ORATORIO | LAUDATORIA, | IN AEDIBUS | Collegii Regalis Med. Lond. | 17mo die Septembris. 1697. | [rule] p. 335: [rule] | THE | WORKS | OF | GEORGE STEPNEY, [i]Esq;[/i] | [rule]
Comments:
CONTENTS: The Hind and the Panther Transvers'd (pp.121-151) contains verse fragments: only those four lines or longer have been indexed. Sections have separate contents pages: Roscommon's poems p.67 Dorset's works p. 91 Hallifax's works p. 152 Garth's works p. 333 Stepney's works p. 400. Contents: French verse p. 86; Latin verse pp. 99-102, 392-6; The Hind and the Panther pp. 121-151; Prose pp. 258-288; Latin prose pp. 317-330; Latin inscription pp. 330-1.
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Dedication 'To the Right Honourable Philip Dormer Earl of Chesterfield' signed 'The Editor' [2pp.]; Preface [2pp.]
Related Miscellanies
Title:
The minor poets or the works of the most celebrated authors [vol 2] [N6033] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1751
ESTC No:
N6033
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Related People
Publisher:
Peter. Wilson
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
Publisher:
J. Esdall
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
Publisher:
M. Williamson
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
Publisher:
J. Exshaw
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
Publisher:
R. James
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
Publisher:
S. Price
Confidence:
Absolute
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Happy that author whose correct essay
Page No:
pp.3-15
Poem Title:
An Essay on Translated Verse.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
O azure vaults o crystal sky
Page No:
pp.16-18
Poem Title:
A Paraphrase on the CXLVIIIth Psalm.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Folly and vice are easy to describe
Page No:
p.19
Poem Title:
A Prologue spoken to his Royal Highness the Duke of York, at Edinburgh.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
I first of Romans stooped to rural strains
Page No:
pp.21-24
Poem Title:
The Sixth Eclogue. Silenus.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Hail sacred solitude from this calm bay
Page No:
pp.27-28
Poem Title:
Ode upon Solitude.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Virtue dear friend needs no defence
Page No:
pp.28-29
Poem Title:
The Twenty Second Ode of the First Book of Horace.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Virtue dear friend needs no defence
Page No:
pp.29-30
Poem Title:
The Same imitated.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Be gone you slaves you idle vermin go
Page No:
pp.30-32
Poem Title:
On Mr. Dryden's Religio Laici.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Dear happy groves and you the dark retreat
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
Part of the Fifth Scene of the Second Act in Guarini's Pastor Fido. Translated into English.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
From deepest dungeons of eternal night
Page No:
pp.34-36
Poem Title:
The Ghost of the Old House of Commons, to the New One, appointed to meet at Oxford.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
To the pale tyrant who to horrid graves
Page No:
p.34
Poem Title:
The Dream.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Thou happy creature art secure
Page No:
pp.36-37
Poem Title:
On the Death of a Lady's Dog.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Winter thy cruelty extend
Page No:
pp.37-38
Poem Title:
Song. On a young Lady who sung finely, and was afraid of a Cold.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
You've seen tonight the glory of the east
Page No:
pp.38-39
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Alexander the Great when acted at the Theatre in Dublin.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
The day of wrath that dreadful day
Page No:
pp.39-41
Poem Title:
On the Day of Judgment.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
The mighty rivals whose destructive rage
Page No:
pp.42-43
Poem Title:
Prologue to Pompey, A Tragedy, translated by Mrs. K. Philips, from the French of Monsieur Corneille, and acted at the Theatre in Dublin.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Shame of my life disturber of my tomb
Page No:
pp.43-44
Poem Title:
Ross's Ghost.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
The gods were pleased to choose the conquering side
Page No:
p.44
Poem Title:
Translation of the following Verse from Lucan. Victrix Causa Diis placuit, sed Victa Catoni.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Those ills your ancestors have done
Page No:
pp.44-46
Poem Title:
The Sixth Ode of the Third Book of Horace. Of the Corruption of the Times.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
If in a picture Piso you should see
Page No:
pp.49-66
Poem Title:
Horace Of The Art of Poetry.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscommon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Come on you critics find one fault who dares
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
To Mr. Edward Howard, On his incomparable incomprehensible Poem. called the British Princess.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Thou damned Antipodes to common sense
Page No:
pp.72-73
Poem Title:
To the Same, on his Plays.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Tarugo gave us wonder and delight
Page No:
pp.73-74
Poem Title:
To Sir Thomas St. Serf, on the printing his Play called Tarugo's Wiles. Acted 1668.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Many have been the vain attempts of wit
Page No:
pp.74-75
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Moliere's Tartuffe, translated by Mr. Medburne, spoken by Tartuffe.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Entreaty shall not serve nor violence
Page No:
pp.76-77
Poem Title:
Epilogue on the Revival of Ben. Johnson's Play, call'd, Every Man in his Humour.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
To all you ladies now at land
Page No:
pp.78-80
Poem Title:
Song. Written at Sea, in the first Dutch War, 1665, the Night before an Engagement.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Proud with the spoils of royal cully
Page No:
pp.81-82
Poem Title:
On the Same.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Tell me Dorinda why so gay
Page No:
p.81
Poem Title:
On the Countess of Dorchester, Mistress to King James the Second. Written in 1680.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
At noon in a sunshiny day
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
Knotting.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Ah Chloris tis time to disarm your bright eyes
Page No:
p.83
Poem Title:
Song To Chloris from the Blind Archer.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Methinks the poor town has been troubled too long
Page No:
pp.84-85
Poem Title:
Song.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
May the ambitious ever find
Page No:
p.85
Poem Title:
Song.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
In grey haired Celia's withered arms
Page No:
p.87
Poem Title:
A Paraphrase of the foregoing.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Phillis the fairest of love's foes
Page No:
p.88
Poem Title:
Song.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Dorinda's sparkling wit and eyes
Page No:
p.88
Poem Title:
Song.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Sylvia methinks you are unfit
Page No:
p.89
Poem Title:
Song.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Phillis for shame let us improve
Page No:
pp.89-90
Poem Title:
Song.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Dorset.
Attributed To:
Charles Sackville
First Line:
Farewell great Charles monarch of blessed renown
Page No:
pp.95-99
Poem Title:
On the Death of His Most Sacred Majesty King Charles II.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Whilst black designs that direful work of fate
Page No:
pp.102-105
Poem Title:
Ode on the Marriage of the Princess Anne and Prince George of Denmark.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Not all the threats or favour of a crown
Page No:
pp.105-109
Poem Title:
The Man of Honour; Occasioned by a Postscript of Penn's Letter.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
What shall the King the nation's genius raise
Page No:
pp.109-116
Poem Title:
An Epistle to Charles Earl of Dorset, occasioned by his Majesty's Victory in Ireland.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Vandyke had colours softness fire and art
Page No:
p.116
Poem Title:
Written at Althrop, in a blank Leaf of Waller's Poems, upon seeing Vandyke's Picture of the old Lady Sunderland.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
All nature's charms in Sunderland appear
Page No:
pp.117-118
Poem Title:
Lady Sunderland.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
The line of Vere so long renowned in arms
Page No:
p.117
Poem Title:
Verses written for the Toasting-Glasses of the Kit-cat Club, 1703. Dutchess of St. Albans.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Of two fair Richmonds different ages boast
Page No:
p.117
Poem Title:
Dutchess of Richmond.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Offspring of a tuneful sire
Page No:
p.117
Poem Title:
Dutchess of Beaufort.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Fairest and latest of the beauteous race
Page No:
p.117
Poem Title:
Lady Mary Churchill.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Courage dear Moll and drive away despair
Page No:
pp.118-119
Poem Title:
On the Countess Dowager of ***
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Admired in Germany adored in France
Page No:
p.118
Poem Title:
Mademoiselle Spanheime.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Hail tuneful pair say by what wondrous charms
Page No:
p.119
Poem Title:
On Orpheus and Signora Francisca Margaritta.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Hallifax.
Attributed To:
Charles Montagu
First Line:
A milk white mouse immortal and unchanged
Page No:
p.130
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Yet had she oft been scared by bloody claws
Page No:
p.130
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Of these a slaughtered army lay in blood
Page No:
p.131
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
The common hunt she timorously passed by
Page No:
p.132
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
The divine blacksmith in the abyss of light
Page No:
p.136
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
She in a masquerade of mirth and love
Page No:
pp.137-138
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
A spotted mouse the prettiest next the white
Page No:
p.137
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
- did invite her home
Page No:
p.140
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Come at a crown a head ourselves we'll treat
Page No:
pp.141-142
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Leave leave this hoary shed and lonely hills
Page No:
p.141
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
With these allurements did invite
Page No:
p.142
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
But here the white by observation wise
Page No:
p.142
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
What need we find him we have certain proof
Page No:
p.143
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
As though 'tis controverted in the school
Page No:
p.143
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
I've eyes as well as you to find the way
Page No:
p.144
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
But now at Piccadilly they arrive
Page No:
p.145
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Thence to the devil and asked if Chanticleer
Page No:
p.145
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Ere that Gazette was printed said the white
Page No:
pp.147-148
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Sirrah says Brindle thou hast brought us wine
Page No:
p.149
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Why what a devil shan't I trust my eyes
Page No:
p.149
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
But now with a weary yawn that showed her pride
Page No:
p.150
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
The constable alarmed by this noise
Page No:
pp.150-151
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Collected under Halifax's name; 'Written in Conjunction with Mr. Prior' (p.121).
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
Charles Montagu
First Line:
Oh that some genius whose poetic vein
Page No:
p.165
Poem Title:
To Dr. G--th, upon the Dispensary.
Attribution:
C. Boyle.
Attributed To:
Charles Boyle
First Line:
Ask me not friend what I approve or blame
Page No:
pp.166-167
Poem Title:
To my Friend the Author, desiring my Opinion of his Poem.
Attribution:
Chr. Codrington.
Attributed To:
Christopher Codrington
First Line:
To praise your healing art would be in vain
Page No:
p.168
Poem Title:
To my Friend Dr. G---th, the Author of the Dispensary.
Attribution:
Tho. Cheek.
Attributed To:
Thomas Cheek
First Line:
As when the people of the northern zone
Page No:
pp.169-170
Poem Title:
To my Friend, upon the Dispensary.
Attribution:
H. Blount.
Attributed To:
H. Blount
First Line:
Speak goddess since tis thou that best canst tell
Page No:
pp.171-229
Poem Title:
The Dispensary.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
What frenzy has of late possessed the brain
Page No:
pp.233-243
Poem Title:
Claremont.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
In moving lines these few epistles tell
Page No:
pp.244-245
Poem Title:
To the Lady Louisa Lenos: With Ovid's Epistles.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
My lord | Our poet's rules in easy numbers tell
Page No:
pp.245-246
Poem Title:
To Richard Earl of Burlington, with Ovid's Art of Love.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Cease rural conquests and set free your swains
Page No:
pp.246-247
Poem Title:
To the Dutchess of Bolton on her staying all the Winter in the Country.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Go mighty prince and those great nations see
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
To the Duke of Marlborough on his voluntary Banishment.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Whilst weeping Europe bends beneath her ills
Page No:
pp.248-249
Poem Title:
To the Earl of Godolphin.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Near the vast bulk of that stupendous frame
Page No:
pp.249-250
Poem Title:
On her Majesty's Statue in St. Paul's Churchyard.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Where where degenerate countrymen how high
Page No:
pp.250-251
Poem Title:
On the New Conspiracy, 1716.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Carlisle's a name can every muse inspire
Page No:
pp.251-252
Poem Title:
Verses written for the Toasting Glasses of the Kiy-Cat-Club. 1703. Lady Carlisle.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Pallas destructive to the Trojan line
Page No:
p.251
Poem Title:
On the King of Spain.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
At once the sun and Carlisle took their way
Page No:
p.252
Poem Title:
The Same.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
The bravest hero and the brightest dame
Page No:
p.252
Poem Title:
Lady Essex.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
The god of wine grows jealous of his art
Page No:
p.252
Poem Title:
Lady Hyde.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
When Jove to Ida did the gods invite
Page No:
p.252
Poem Title:
Lady Wharton.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Hyde though in agonies her graces keeps
Page No:
p.252
Poem Title:
On Lady Hyde in Child-bed.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
To Essex fill the sprightly wine
Page No:
p.252
Poem Title:
The Same.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Today a mighty hero comes to warm
Page No:
pp.253-254
Poem Title:
Prologue designed for Tamerlane.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Where music and more powerful beauties reign
Page No:
p.254
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Musick-meeting in York-Buildings.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Who dares not plot in this goodnatured age
Page No:
pp.254-255
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Cornish Squire, a Comedy.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Such was our builder's art that soon as named
Page No:
pp.256-257
Poem Title:
Prologue spoken at the Opening of the Queen's Theatre in the Haymarket.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
What odd fantastic things we women do
Page No:
pp.257-258
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Tragedy of Cato.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now Glaucus with a lover's haste bounds over
Page No:
pp.289-290
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book XIV. The Transformation of Scylla.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Here bulged the pride of famed Ulysses' fleet
Page No:
pp.290-291
Poem Title:
The Voyage of Aeneas continu'd.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now on his right he leaves Parthenope
Page No:
pp.291-292
Poem Title:
Aeneas descends to Hell.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
The galleys now by Pythecusa pass
Page No:
p.291
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Cercopians into Apes.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
I am no deity replied the dame
Page No:
pp.292-293
Poem Title:
The Story of the Sibyl.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Achaemenides with thanks I name
Page No:
pp.293-294
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Achaemenides.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Then Macareus there reigned a prince of fame
Page No:
pp.294-295
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Macareus.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Before the spacious front a herd we find
Page No:
pp.295-296
Poem Title:
The Enchantments of Circe.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Picus who once the Ausonian sceptre held
Page No:
pp.296-300
Poem Title:
The Story of Picus and Canens.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Macareus now with a pious aim
Page No:
p.300
Poem Title:
Aeneas arrives in Italy.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
After famed Ilium was by Argives won
Page No:
pp.301-302
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Diomedes.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Meanwhile the Latians all their power prepare
Page No:
pp.302-304
Poem Title:
The Trojan Ships transform'd to Sea-Nymphs.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Diomedes Venulus withdraws
Page No:
p.302
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Appulus.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now had Aeneas as ordained by fate
Page No:
pp.304-305
Poem Title:
The Deification of Aeneas.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
A Hama-Dryad flourished in these days
Page No:
pp.305-308
Poem Title:
The Story of Vertumnus and Pomona.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Ascanius now the Latian sceptre sways
Page No:
p.305
Poem Title:
The Line of the Latian Kings.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Iphis of vulgar birth by chance had viewed
Page No:
pp.308-309
Poem Title:
The Story of Iphis and Anaxarete.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now Procas yielding to the fates his son
Page No:
pp.310-311
Poem Title:
The Latian Line continu'd.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Ere long the goddess of the nuptial bed
Page No:
pp.311-312
Poem Title:
The Assumption of Hersilia.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now warrior Mars his burnished helm puts on
Page No:
p.311
Poem Title:
The Assumption of Romulus.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Or as when Cippus in the current viewed
Page No:
pp.213[i.e. 312]-314
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book XV. The Story of Cippus.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Could he whom my dissembled rigour grieves
Page No:
pp.314-315
Poem Title:
A Soliloquy out of Italian.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Can you count the silver lights
Page No:
p.315
Poem Title:
An Imitation of a French Author.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
When fame did over the spacious plain
Page No:
p.331
Poem Title:
To Mr. Gay on his Poems.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Unwieldy pedant let thy awkward muse
Page No:
p.332
Poem Title:
To the merry Peotaster [sic] at Sadlers-Hall in Cheapside.
Attribution:
Sir Samuel Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
As victors lose the trouble they sustain
Page No:
p.337
Poem Title:
To King James II. Upon his Accession to the Throne. The Author then of Trinity-College, Cambridge.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Yes fickle Cambridge Perkins found this true
Page No:
pp.338-339
Poem Title:
On the University of Cambridge's burning the Duke of Monmouth's Picture, 1685. who was formerly their Chancellor. -- In Answer to this Question, --Sed quid | Turba Remi? sequitur fortunam, ut semper, & odit | Damnatos. --
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Sir | Since you oft invite me to renew
Page No:
pp.339-346
Poem Title:
An Epistle to Charles Montague, Esq; on his Majesty's Voyage to Holland.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
The youth whose fortune the vast globe obeyed
Page No:
p.346
Poem Title:
On the late horrid Conspiracy
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
He's gone and was it then by your decree
Page No:
pp.347-349
Poem Title:
To the Earl of Carlisle, upon the Death of his Son before Luxemburgh.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Once more my muse we must an altar raise
Page No:
pp.349-353
Poem Title:
A Poem dedicated to the Blessed Memory of her late Gracious Majesty Queen Mary.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
At Anna's call the Austrian eagle flies
Page No:
p.353
Poem Title:
The Austrian Eagle.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
At dead of night imperial reason sleeps
Page No:
pp.353-354
Poem Title:
The Nature of Dreams.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
When money and my blood ran high
Page No:
pp.354-355
Poem Title:
Verses imitated from the French of Monsieur Maynard, to Cardinal Richelieu.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Mun rarely credit common fame
Page No:
pp.355-356
Poem Title:
To Mr. Edmund Smith.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Whenever I wive young Strephon cried
Page No:
p.357
Poem Title:
The Spell.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
What's the advantage or the real good
Page No:
pp.358-373
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Eighth Sature.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Dear Molly why so oft in tears
Page No:
pp.385-386
Poem Title:
Horace. Book III. Ode VII. Imitated.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Verses immortal as my bays I sing
Page No:
pp.386-388
Poem Title:
Horace. Book IV. Ode IX.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
If Memnon's fate bewailed with constant dew
Page No:
pp.389-391
Poem Title:
Elegy upon the Death of Tibullus. From Ovid.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Bright star by Venus fixed above
Page No:
pp.391-392
Poem Title:
To the Evening-Star. English'd, from a Greek Idyllium.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
The gods and Cato did in this divide
Page No:
p.397
Poem Title:
Translation of the following Verse from Lucan. Victrix Causa Diis placuit, sed Victa Catoni.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
The critics that pretend to sense
Page No:
pp.397-399
Poem Title:
The Audience.
Attribution:
George Stepney, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Stepney