Blacklight

The essence of theatrical wit being a select collection of the best and most admired prologues and epilogues [T113755]

DMI number:
1566
Publication Date:
1768
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T113755
EEBO/ECCO link:
N/A
Shelfmark:
BL 642.c.29
Full Title:
THE | ESSENCE | OF | THEATRICAL WIT: | BEING | A SELECT COLLECTION | Of the best and most admired | Prologues and Epilogues, | That have been delivered from the Stage. | With the Addition of some that were never | made public before. | [ornament] | LONDON: | Printed for P. WICKS, in Middle-Row, Holborn, and | may be had of the Booksellers in Town and Country. | MDCCLXVIII.
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection including drama
Format:
Octavo
Pagination:
[2], [1]-54 (p.44 mispaginated p.48).
Related People
Publisher:
P Wicks
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Printed for P. WICKS, in Middle Row, Holborn
Content/Publication
First Line:
An old trite proverb let me quote
Page No:
pp.[1]-2
Poem Title:
Prologues on Prologue, Written by Mr, Garrick, and spoken by Mr. King, at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane, on performing a Farce called The Musical Lady.
Attribution:
by Mr. Garrick
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
To wake the soul by tender strokes of art
Page No:
pp.3-4
Poem Title:
The Original Prologue to Cato. Written by Mr. Pope, spoken by Wilks.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Behold a wonder for theatric story
Page No:
pp.4-6
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Apprentice... spoken by Mr. Murphy, the author of The Apprentice.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
A very pretty bill as I'm alive
Page No:
pp.6-7
Poem Title:
The Epilogue. Spoken by Mrs. Clive. Enters reading the Play-Bill.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well if thou art my boy a little mellow
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken by Mr. Garrick, in the Character of a Sailor fuddled, and talking to himself. Enter singing, How pleasant a sailor's life passes,---
Attribution:
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
From the earliest times the business of the stage
Page No:
pp.10-11
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Tragedy of Sir Walter Raleigh, Acted at the Castle, at Kentish-Town, by the Gentlemen of Mr. Rey's Boarding-School. Spoken by Master Shiers, in the Character of Howard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A moment stop your tuneful fingers pray
Page No:
pp.11-13
Poem Title:
Prologues to the Fairies, An Opera, taken from Shakespeare's Midsummer's Night's Dream.
Attribution:
Written and spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
If in these days of luxury and ease
Page No:
pp.13-14
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Tragedy of Agis... Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Written by a Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A king in bloom of youth for freedom die
Page No:
pp.14-15
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Agis. Spoken by Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Twas once the mode inglorious war to wage
Page No:
pp.15-16
Poem Title:
Prologue to the tragedy of Cleone... spoken by Mr. Ross.
Attribution:
by William Melmouth, Esq;
Attributed To:
William Melmoth
First Line:
Well ladies so much for the tragic style
Page No:
pp.16-18
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Cleone... spoken by Mrs. Bellamy.
Attribution:
William Shenstone
Attributed To:
William Shenstone
First Line:
With doubt joy apprehension almost dumb
Page No:
pp.18-19
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoke to Much Ado about Nothing, Acted by Command of his Majesty, [...] Being his first appearance on the Stage, after his Return from Italy.
Attribution:
By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Some strange caprice forever rules the stage
Page No:
pp.20-21
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Citzen, a Farce... Spoken by Mr. Obrien.
Attribution:
By A. Murphy, Esq;
Attributed To:
Arthur Murphy
First Line:
Oh George George George tis such rakes as you
Page No:
pp.21-23
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Citizen, Spoekn by Mr. Shuter and Mr. Woodward, in the Characters of Old Philpot and Young Philpot.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Before you see one of your stage directors
Page No:
pp.23-24
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken by Mr. Powell, And said to be written by Mr. G------, on the Opening of the Bristol Theatre.
Attribution:
by Mr. G------
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In days of yore it was a constant rule
Page No:
pp.25-26
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken by Mr. Arthur, one of the Managers.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Too long by some fatality misled
Page No:
pp.26-27
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Englishman at Bourdeaux, Performed, since the Conclusion of the Peace, with universal Applause, at Paris.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The anxious struggle happily overpast
Page No:
pp.27-28
Poem Title:
Epilogue.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The paths of truth with fancy's flowers to strow
Page No:
pp.28-29
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Comedy of the Dupe... Spoken by Mr. Harvard.
Attribution:
Written by the late Mrs. Sheridan.
Attributed To:
Frances Sheridan [nee Chamberlaine]
First Line:
Ladies methinks I hear you all complain
Page No:
pp.29-30
Poem Title:
Epilogue... Spoken by Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
by a Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since my good friends though late are pleased at last
Page No:
pp.30-31
Poem Title:
Mr. Garrick's Address to the Town, In the Character of the Busy Body.
Attribution:
Mr. Garrick's
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
While modern tragedy by rule exact
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
Prologue to Philaster... On Mr. Powell's first Appearance on the Stage.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With much reluctance they have brought me here
Page No:
pp.33-34
Poem Title:
Prologue... As it was spoken to the Comedy of the Merry Midnight Mistake, as acted at Chelmsford, nine successive Nights, by a Set of Young Gentlemen for their Amusement.
Attribution:
by G. S. Carey,
Attributed To:
George Saville Carey
First Line:
I tell you I will plague on it I am so teased
Page No:
p.35
Poem Title:
The Epilogue.
Attribution:
By the Author of the Prologue.
Attributed To:
George Saville Carey
First Line:
Were it not sirs impossible to find
Page No:
pp.36-37
Poem Title:
Prologue to Redowald, a Masque, (written by a Young Gentleman of Sixteen.)
Attribution:
By G. S. Carey.
Attributed To:
George Saville Carey
First Line:
Should some grave wit our author's piece decry
Page No:
p.37
Poem Title:
The Epilogue.
Attribution:
By the Same.
Attributed To:
George Saville Carey
First Line:
Poets and painters who from nature draw
Page No:
p.38
Poem Title:
Prologue To the Clandestine Marriage, [...] spoken by Mr. Holland.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies with leave | pass | pass | you must do more
Page No:
pp.39-48 [i.e. p.44]
Poem Title:
Epilogue.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
To lead attention through five acts of prose
Page No:
p.45
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Double Mistake. Spoken by Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I had an epilogue to speak tonight
Page No:
pp.46-47
Poem Title:
Epilogue. Spoken by Miss Wilford, in the Character of Lady Louisa.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Nay but I must I must indeed papa
Page No:
pp.47-48
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-lane, April 30, 1765, by Miss Hopkins, a child of six Years old, at the Benefit of Mr. Hopkins, Prompter, and Mrs. Hopkins.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
News news good folks rare news and you shall know it
Page No:
pp.48-49
Poem Title:
Epilogue. To Mr. Jones's Tragedy of the Earl of Essex.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Severe each poet's lot but sure most hard
Page No:
pp.50-51
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Earl of Warwick... Spoken by Mr. Bensley.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Exhausted quite with prisons racks and death
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
Epilogue... spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
When with the comic muse a bard hath dealing
Page No:
pp.53-54
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the New Comedy of False Delicacy... spoken by Mrs. Dancer.
Attribution:
Written by David Garrick, Esq;
Attributed To:
David Garrick