Blacklight

The muses library; or a series of English poetry, from the Saxons, to the Reign of King Charles II [T144867] [ecco]

DMI number:
588
Publication Date:
1737
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T144867
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW112079805
Shelfmark:
ECCO - BOD
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Octavo
Comments:
FULL TITLE: THE | Muses Library; | Or a Series of | [i]English[/i] POETRY, | FROM THE | [i]SAXONS[/i], to the Reign of King | [i]CHARLES[/i] II. | CONTAINING, | The Lives and Characters of all the known Writers | in that Interval, the Names of their Patrons; | Complete Episodes, by way of Specimen of the | larger Pieces, very near the intire Works of sone, | and large Quotations from others. | BEING | A General Collection of almost all the old valuable Poetry | extant, now so industriously enquir'd after, tho' rarely to be | found, but in the Studies of the Curious, and affording | Entertainment on all Subjects, Philosophical, Historical, | Moral, Satyrical, Allegorical, Critical, Heroick, Pastoral, | Gallant, Amorous, Courtly, and Sublime, | BY |[four columns] [column 1] [i]Langland, | Gower, | Chaucer, | Lidgate, | Occleve, | Harding, | Barclay, | Fabian, [/column 1] | [column 2] Skelton, | Howard[/i] Earl | of [i]Surrey,[/i] | Sir [i]T. Wyat,[/i] | Dr. [i]Bourd, | Sackville[/i] Earl | of [i]Dorset, | Churchyard, [/column 2] | [column 3] Higgens, | Warner, Gascoign, | Turberville, | Nash,[/i] | Sir [i]Philip Sidney, | Grevill[/i] L. [i]Brook, | Spencer,[/i] [/column 3] | [column 4] Sir [i]John Har-|rington, | Chalkhill, | Fairfax,[/i] | Sir [i]John Davis[/i], | Sir [i]W. Raleigh,[/i] | Sir [i]Edw. Dyer, | Daniel[/i], &c. | [rule] | VOL. I. | [rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed for J. WILCOX in the [i]Strand;[/i] T. GREEN at [i]Charing-| Cross[/i]; J. BRINDLEY in [i]New-Bond-Street[/i]; and T. OSBORN in [i]Gray's Inn.[/i] | MDCCXXXVII. PAGINATION:?? PREFATORY MATTER: Dedication 'To the truly Honourable Society for the Encouragement of Learning' signed E. Cooper (4pp.); 'The Preface' pp. [vii]-xvi; Errata, p. xvi. CONTENTS: Most poems have a short prose introduction. BIBLIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS: 'The End of the First Volume' on p. 400. No more volumes published. REFERENCES: Case 415. MISCELLANY GENRE: collection of 15th-17th century verse.
Related Miscellanies
Title:
The historical and poetical medley or muses library [T61451] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1738
ESTC No:
T61451
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Reissue
Comments:
Title:
The muses library; or a series of English poetry [T144866] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1741
ESTC No:
T144866
Volume:
None
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Related People
Editor:
Elizabeth Cooper
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Editor:
William Oldys
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
According to ESTC record, Oldys assisted Cooper in editing the volume.
Content/Publication
First Line:
And whereto serves that wondrous trophy now
Page No:
pp.x-xi
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
the ingenious Mr. Daniel, in his Poem call'd Musophilus
Attributed To:
Samuel Daniel
First Line:
Perhaps the words thou scornest now
Page No:
pp.xi-x
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
the ingenious Mr. Daniel, in his Poem call'd Musophilus
Attributed To:
Samuel Daniel
First Line:
Iche Edward Koning
Page No:
pp.1-2
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
a Conveyance of Edward the Confessor's
Attributed To:
Edward the Confessor
First Line:
Two tunne there beth of bras
Page No:
pp.3-4
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
the Author entirely unknown
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
King Henry is dead beauty of the world
Page No:
pp.4-5
Poem Title:
Verses on Henry I. wrote immediately after his Death.
Attribution:
the Author unknown
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As his chamberlain him brought as he rose on a day
Page No:
pp.5-6
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Robert of Gloucester
Attributed To:
Robert of Gloucester
First Line:
In dreary verse my rhymes I make
Page No:
p.7
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Robert Baston
Attributed To:
Robert Baston
First Line:
The founder of this city saith Polychronicon
Page No:
p.7
Poem Title:
On the City of Chester
Attribution:
Henry Bradshaw
Attributed To:
Henry Bradshaw
First Line:
Hereto assented Civil and Simony ne would
Page No:
pp.9-13
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Robert de Langland
Attributed To:
Robert Langland
First Line:
And ye that seek St James and saints at Rome
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Robert de Langland
Attributed To:
Robert Langland
First Line:
Envy with heavy heart asked after shrift
Page No:
pp.13-16
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Robert de Langland
Attributed To:
Robert Langland
First Line:
Then came Sloth all beslabberd with two slimy eyne
Page No:
pp.16-17
Poem Title:
Sloth.
Attribution:
Robert de Langland
Attributed To:
Robert Langland
First Line:
Kind Conscience though heard and came out of the planets
Page No:
pp.17-18
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Robert de Langland
Attributed To:
Robert Langland
First Line:
Immediately a place
Page No:
pp.18-19
Poem Title:
Paradise Lost. Book II. Line 475.
Attribution:
Milton
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
O morall Gower this boke I directe
Page No:
p.19
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Chaucer
Attributed To:
Geoffrey Chaucer
First Line:
Of Jupiter thus I find ywrite
Page No:
pp.19-22
Poem Title:
Of the envious Man and the Miser.
Attribution:
Sir John Gower
Attributed To:
John Gower
First Line:
Lordings quoth he in chirch when I preche
Page No:
pp.24-29
Poem Title:
The Pardoners Prologue.
Attribution:
Chaucer
Attributed To:
Geoffrey Chaucer
First Line:
Out of the French I drough it of entent
Page No:
p.30
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
John Lidgate
Attributed To:
John Lydgate
First Line:
But welaway is mine heart wo
Page No:
p.31
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Thomas Occleve, or Okeleafe
Attributed To:
Thomas Hoccleve [Occleve]
First Line:
Truly I herd Robert Irelesse say
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
On the magnificent Houshold of King Richard II.
Attribution:
John Harding
Attributed To:
John Hardyng
First Line:
To you these accord these unto you are due
Page No:
pp.34-36
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Alexander Barclay
Attributed To:
Alexander Barclay
First Line:
To ship gallants the sea is at the full
Page No:
pp.36-38
Poem Title:
The Clamour to the Fooles.
Attribution:
Alexander Barclay
Attributed To:
Alexander Barclay
First Line:
I am the first fool of all the whole navy
Page No:
pp.38-40
Poem Title:
The Book-Worm.
Attribution:
Alexander Barclay
Attributed To:
Alexander Barclay
First Line:
Here maketh mine author a special mention
Page No:
pp.41-44
Poem Title:
The Hypocrite.
Attribution:
Alexander Barclay
Attributed To:
Alexander Barclay
First Line:
When Saturn with his cold icy face
Page No:
pp.45-47
Poem Title:
Translated from the Latin of the unfortunate Edward the Second.
Attribution:
Robert Fabian
Attributed To:
Robert Fabyan
First Line:
Who so him liketh these verses to read
Page No:
pp.47-48
Poem Title:
An Apology for having prais'd the City of London, in Verses, which he calls Ryme-Doggerel.
Attribution:
Robert Fabian
Attributed To:
Robert Fabyan
First Line:
In autumn when the sun in virgin
Page No:
pp.49-55
Poem Title:
The Prologue to the Bouge of Court.
Attribution:
John Skelton
Attributed To:
John Skelton
First Line:
From Tuscane came my lady's worthy race
Page No:
p.57
Poem Title:
Description and Praise of his Love Geraldine.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
The soote season that bud and bloom forth brings
Page No:
pp.57-58
Poem Title:
Description of Spring, wherein eche thing renewes, save only the Lover.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
When youth had led me half the race
Page No:
pp.58-59
Poem Title:
Description of the restless estate of a Lover.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
Brittle beauty that nature made so frail
Page No:
pp.59-60
Poem Title:
The frailtye and hurtfulnes of Beautie.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
Set me whereas the sun doth parch the green
Page No:
pp.60-61
Poem Title:
A Vowe to love faithfully Howsoeuer he be rewarded.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
So cruel prison how could betide alas
Page No:
pp.61-63
Poem Title:
Prisoner in Windsor, he recounteth his pleasure there passed.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
O happy dames that may embrace
Page No:
pp.63-65
Poem Title:
Complaint of the absence of her Lover being upon the Seas.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
Give place ye lovers here before
Page No:
pp.65-66
Poem Title:
A praise of hys Love, wherein he reproveth them that compare their Ladies with his.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
Laid in my quiet bed in study as I were
Page No:
pp.67-69
Poem Title:
How no age is content with his owne estate, and how the age of Children is the happiest if they had skill to understand it.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
Martial the things that do attain
Page No:
p.67
Poem Title:
The meanes to attayne happy lyfe.
Attribution:
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Attributed To:
Henry Howard
First Line:
My lute awake perform the last
Page No:
pp.70-72
Poem Title:
The Lover complaineth the unkindess of his love.
Attribution:
Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Sir Thomas Wyatt
First Line:
In court to serve decked with fresh array
Page No:
p.72
Poem Title:
The Courtiers Life.
Attribution:
Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Sir Thomas Wyatt
First Line:
Mine own John Poines since ye delight to know
Page No:
pp.72-76
Poem Title:
Of the Courtiers life, written to John Poynes.
Attribution:
Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Sir Thomas Wyatt
First Line:
A spending hand that alway poureth out
Page No:
pp.77-80
Poem Title:
How to use the Court and himself therein, written to Sir Fraunces Bryan.
Attribution:
Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Sir Thomas Wyatt
First Line:
If right be racked and overrun
Page No:
pp.81-82
Poem Title:
They of the meane Estate are happiest.
Attribution:
the Authors of which are unknown, but suppos'd Contemporary with Lord Surrey and Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The longer life the more offence
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
Upon consideration of the State of this Life he wisheth Death.
Attribution:
the Authors of which are unknown, but suppos'd Contemporary with Lord Surrey and Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A student at his book so placed
Page No:
p.83
Poem Title:
Of a New Married Studient that plaied fast and lose.
Attribution:
the Authors of which are unknown, but suppos'd Contemporary with Lord Surrey and Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Give place you ladies and be gone
Page No:
pp.83-86
Poem Title:
A praise of his ladie.
Attribution:
the Authors of which are unknown, but suppos'd Contemporary with Lord Surrey and Sir Thomas Wyat
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I am an Englishman and naked I stand here
Page No:
pp.86-88
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Andrew Bourd
Attributed To:
Andrew Boorde
First Line:
The wrathful winter hastening on apace
Page No:
pp.89-117
Poem Title:
Induction to the Mirror of Magistrates.
Attribution:
T. Sackville
Attributed To:
Thomas Sackville
First Line:
Among the rest by fortune overthrown
Page No:
pp.118-136
Poem Title:
Jane Shore.
Attribution:
Thomas Churchyard
Attributed To:
Thomas Churchyard
First Line:
If sloth and tract of time
Page No:
pp.137-142
Poem Title:
On the English Poets.
Attribution:
Thomas Churchyard
Attributed To:
Thomas Churchyard
First Line:
When summer sweet with all her pleasures past
Page No:
pp.142-148
Poem Title:
Second Induction to the Mirror of Magistrates.
Attribution:
John Higgins
Attributed To:
John Higgins
First Line:
Who is more bold then is the Bayard blind
Page No:
pp.148-156
Poem Title:
The Prologue of Michael Joseph the Black-Smith.
Attribution:
Mr. Cauil
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The Brutons thus departed hence seven kingdoms here begun
Page No:
pp.157-168
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
William Warner
Attributed To:
William Warner
First Line:
At beauty's bar as I did stand
Page No:
pp.169-171
Poem Title:
The Araignment of a Louer.
Attribution:
G. Gascoigne
Attributed To:
George Gascoigne
First Line:
And now with care I can record those days
Page No:
p.172
Poem Title:
From his Dan Bartholomew, &c.
Attribution:
G. Gascoigne
Attributed To:
George Gascoigne
First Line:
O loving youths this glass was made for you
Page No:
p.173
Poem Title:
From the same.
Attribution:
G. Gascoigne
Attributed To:
George Gascoigne
First Line:
The poets old in their fond fable feign
Page No:
pp.173-180
Poem Title:
From the Fruits of War.
Attribution:
G. Gascoigne
Attributed To:
George Gascoigne
First Line:
Why is't damnation to despair and die
Page No:
pp.181-182
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Thomas Nash
Attributed To:
Thomas Nashe
First Line:
Let all his faults sleep in his mournful chest
Page No:
p.183
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Were there no wars poor men should have no peace
Page No:
p.183
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Thomas Nash
Attributed To:
Thomas Nashe
First Line:
At length when reason saw
Page No:
pp.184-194
Poem Title:
The Speech of Reason against Love.
Attribution:
George Turberville
Attributed To:
George Turbervile [Turberville]
First Line:
If merchants in their warped keels
Page No:
pp.194-198
Poem Title:
That Louers ought to shunne no paines to attaine their Loue.
Attribution:
George Turberville
Attributed To:
George Turbervile [Turberville]
First Line:
Should no man write say you
Page No:
pp.198-200
Poem Title:
That no man should write but such as do excell.
Attribution:
George Turberville
Attributed To:
George Turbervile [Turberville]
First Line:
P seems of Venus' stock to be
Page No:
pp.200-203
Poem Title:
In praise of Ladie P.
Attribution:
George Turberville
Attributed To:
George Turbervile [Turberville]
First Line:
Poor painters oft with silly poets join
Page No:
pp.206-209
Poem Title:
The true Picture of Love.
Attribution:
Sir Philip Sidney
Attributed To:
Sir Philip Sidney
First Line:
A neighbour mine not long ago there was
Page No:
pp.209-215
Poem Title:
A Receipt to make a Cuckold. A Tale.
Attribution:
Sir Philip Sidney
Attributed To:
Sir Philip Sidney
First Line:
The mind of man is this world's true dimension
Page No:
pp.217-239
Poem Title:
A Treatise of Humane Learning.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Now mark your charge each fury work his part
Page No:
pp.239-240
Poem Title:
Conclusion of the Prologue to the Tragedy of Alaham: Address'd by a Ghost to the Faries.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Oh wearisome condition of humanity
Page No:
pp.240-241
Poem Title:
Chorus Sacerdotum, at the End of the Tragedy of Mustapha.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
I with whose colours Myra dressed her head
Page No:
pp.241-243
Poem Title:
Myra's Inconstancy.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Away with these self-loving lads
Page No:
pp.243-244
Poem Title:
Love for Love.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
My senses all like beacon's flame
Page No:
pp.245-247
Poem Title:
The Dream.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Caelica when I did see you every day
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
Caelica, always amiable.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Love I did send you forth enamelled fair
Page No:
p.248
Poem Title:
Loves Excuse.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
The little hearts where light winged passion reigns
Page No:
pp.249-250
Poem Title:
Court Favourites.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Rewards of earth nobility and fame
Page No:
pp.250-251
Poem Title:
Nobilitie.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Virgula divina sorcerers call a rod
Page No:
pp.251-252
Poem Title:
On the same.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
Isis in whom the poet's feigning wit
Page No:
pp.252-253
Poem Title:
The Asse of Authority.
Attribution:
Sir Fulk Greville, Lord Brook
Attributed To:
Fulke Greville
First Line:
The first was fancy like a lovely boy
Page No:
pp.256-264
Poem Title:
The Mask of Cupid, Fairy Queen, Book 3. Cant. 12.
Attribution:
Edmund Spencer
Attributed To:
Edmund Spenser
First Line:
Yet the brave courtier in whose beauteous thought
Page No:
pp.264-267
Poem Title:
The brave Courtier, from Mother Hubberds Tale.
Attribution:
Edmund Spenser
Attributed To:
Edmund Spenser
First Line:
Sweet were the sauce would please each kind of taste
Page No:
pp.269-270
Poem Title:
Upon Gascoign's Poem, call'd The Steel-Glass.
Attribution:
Sir Walter Raleigh
Attributed To:
Sir Walter Ralegh [Raleigh]
First Line:
Me thought I saw the grave where Laura lay
Page No:
p.270
Poem Title:
A Vision upon the Faerie Queene.
Attribution:
Sir Walter Raleigh
Attributed To:
Sir Walter Ralegh [Raleigh]
First Line:
The praise of meaner wits this work like profit brings
Page No:
pp.270-271
Poem Title:
On the same.
Attribution:
Sir Walter Raleigh
Attributed To:
Sir Walter Ralegh [Raleigh]
First Line:
If all the world and love were young
Page No:
pp.271-273
Poem Title:
The Nimphs Reply to the Shepheard. In Answer to some Stanzas of Marlows, Beginning, Come live with me &c.
Attribution:
Sir Walter Raleigh
Attributed To:
Sir Walter Ralegh [Raleigh]
First Line:
Passions are likened best to floods and streams
Page No:
pp.273-275
Poem Title:
The silent Lover.
Attribution:
Sir Walter Raleigh
Attributed To:
Sir Walter Ralegh [Raleigh]
First Line:
Prometheus when first from heaven high
Page No:
pp.275-276
Poem Title:
The Shepherd's Conceit of Prometheus.
Attribution:
Sir Ed. Dyer
Attributed To:
Sir Edward Dyer
First Line:
Through a fair forest as I went
Page No:
pp.276-280
Poem Title:
The Wood-Man's Walke.
Attribution:
Shep. Tonie
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In peasecod time when hound to horn
Page No:
pp.281-287
Poem Title:
The Shepherd's Slumber.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Come live me and be my dear
Page No:
pp.287-289
Poem Title:
In Imitation of C. Marlow.
Attribution:
Ignoto
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Phoebus delights to view his laurel tree
Page No:
pp.289-290
Poem Title:
The Shepherd's Solace.
Attribution:
Tho. Watson
Attributed To:
Thomas Watson
First Line:
A careful nymph with careless grief oppressed
Page No:
pp.290-291
Poem Title:
A Pastorall.
Attribution:
Shep. Tonie
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In pride of youth in midsts of May
Page No:
pp.291-294
Poem Title:
The Barginet of Antimachus.
Attribution:
Tho. Lodge
Attributed To:
Thomas Lodge
First Line:
In the merry month of May
Page No:
pp.294-295
Poem Title:
Phillida and Coridon.
Attribution:
N. Breton
Attributed To:
Nicholas Breton [Britton]
First Line:
When lo the goodness and the power divine
Page No:
pp.298-305
Poem Title:
Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Book 15.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
At last his guide him brings
Page No:
pp.305-310
Poem Title:
From the same, Book 34.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
Of writers Sextus's known a true despiser
Page No:
p.310
Poem Title:
A Specimen of Sir John Harington's Epigrams. Against Sextus, a Scorner of Writers.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
The readers and the hearers like my books
Page No:
p.310
Poem Title:
Against Writers that carp at other Mens Books.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
Proud Paulus late advanced to high degree
Page No:
p.311
Poem Title:
Of one Paulus, a great Man, that expected to be followed.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
A slave thou wert by birth of this I gather
Page No:
p.312
Poem Title:
Of Don Pedro.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
Don Pedro's out of debt be bold to say it
Page No:
p.312
Poem Title:
Of Don Pedros Debts.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
I read that satire thou entitlest first
Page No:
p.312
Poem Title:
Against a foolish Satyrist.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
In scorn of writers Faustus still doth hold
Page No:
p.312
Poem Title:
Against Faustus.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
My writings oft displease you what's the matter
Page No:
p.312
Poem Title:
Of plaine dealing.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
A husband and a wife oft disagreeing
Page No:
p.313
Poem Title:
Of devout Parents and Children.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington.
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
Fortune men say doth give too much to many
Page No:
p.314
Poem Title:
Of Fortune.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
Lynus came late to me six crowns to borrow
Page No:
p.314
Poem Title:
Of Lynus, borrowing.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
Treason doth never prosper what's the reason
Page No:
p.314
Poem Title:
Of Treason.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
What curled pate youth is he that sitteth there
Page No:
pp.314-315
Poem Title:
In Cornutum.
Attribution:
Sir John Harington
Attributed To:
Sir John Harington
First Line:
Scarce was a whisper heard such a strange force
Page No:
pp.316-319
Poem Title:
The Arcadian-Golden-Age.
Attribution:
John Chalkhill, Esq;
Attributed To:
John Chalkhill
First Line:
Within a little silent grove hard by
Page No:
pp.319-321
Poem Title:
A Description of the Priestesses of Diana.
Attribution:
John Chalkhill, Esq;
Attributed To:
John Chalkhill
First Line:
A curious eye
Page No:
pp.321-322
Poem Title:
The Image of Jealousy.
Attribution:
John Chalkhill, Esq;
Attributed To:
John Chalkhill
First Line:
Down in a gloomy valley thick with shade
Page No:
pp.322-331
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
John Chalkhill, Esq;
Attributed To:
John Chalkhill
First Line:
Why did my parents send me to the schools
Page No:
pp.333-342
Poem Title:
Nosce Teipsum.
Attribution:
Sir John Davis
Attributed To:
Sir John Davies
First Line:
And with that word she smiled and neretheless
Page No:
pp.345-363
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Edward Fairfax, Esq;
Attributed To:
Edward Fairfax
First Line:
Whilst on the rough and heath strewed wilderness
Page No:
pp.364-376
Poem Title:
Eclogue the Fourth. Eglon and Alexis.
Attribution:
Edward Fairfax, Esq;
Attributed To:
Edward Fairfax
First Line:
Her lily hand her rosy cheeks lies under
Page No:
pp.376-377
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
William Shakespear
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O opportunity thy guilt is great
Page No:
pp.377-380
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
William Shakespear
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O beauty beam nay flame
Page No:
pp.382-386
Poem Title:
A Description of Beauty, translated out of Marino.
Attribution:
Samuel Daniel
Attributed To:
Samuel Daniel
First Line:
Come worthy greek Ulysses come
Page No:
pp.386-389
Poem Title:
Ulysses and the Syren.
Attribution:
Samuel Daniel
Attributed To:
Samuel Daniel
First Line:
Now Isabel the young afflicted queen
Page No:
pp.390-400
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Samuel Daniel
Attributed To:
Samuel Daniel