Blacklight

The Paradise of Dainty Devices [1600] [S105444]

DMI number:
1804
Publication Date:
1600
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
S105444
EEBO/ECCO link:
http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?ctx_ver=Z39.88-2003&res_id=xri:eebo&rft_id=xri:eebo:citation:99841172
Shelfmark:
EEBO
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of 16th century verse and Miscellany associated with group of poets
Format:
Quarto
Content/Publication
First Line:
Why doth each state apply itself to worldly praise
Page No:
sig. A2r-A2v
Poem Title:
The translation of the blessed S. Bernard's verses, containing the unstable felicity of this wayfaring world.
Attribution:
My lucke is losse.
Attributed To:
Walter Map
First Line:
Behold the blast which blows the blossoms from the tree
Page No:
sig. A3r
Poem Title:
1. Our pleasures are but vanities
Attribution:
W. Hunnis
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
Amid the vale the slender shrub is hid from all mishap
Page No:
sig. A3r-A3v
Poem Title:
2. Who waiteth on this wavering world, and vieweth each estate, by trial taught shall learn the best. To live in simple rate.
Attribution:
Iasper Haywood
Attributed To:
Jasper Heywood
First Line:
Not staid state but feeble stay not costly robes but bare array
Page No:
sig. A3v
Poem Title:
3. The perfect trial of a faithful friend.
Attribution:
M. Yloop
Attributed To:
Master Yloop
First Line:
Where sighing sighs and sour sobs
Page No:
sig. A3v-A4v
Poem Title:
4. Being asked the occasion of his white beard, he answereth thus.
Attribution:
W.H.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
Beware of had I wist whose fine brings care and smart
Page No:
sig. A4v
Poem Title:
5. Beware of had I wist.
Attribution:
My lucke is losse.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When May is in his prime then may each heart rejoice
Page No:
sig. A4v-B1r
Poem Title:
6. M. Edwards May
Attribution:
M. Edwards
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
In youthful years when first my young desires began
Page No:
sig. B1r-B1v
Poem Title:
7. Fair words make fools fain.
Attribution:
M. Edwards
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
What grieves my bones and makes my body faint
Page No:
sig. B1v
Poem Title:
8. In his extreme sickness
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
From virgin's womb this day did spring
Page No:
sig. B2r
Poem Title:
9. For Christmas day.
Attribution:
F.K.
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
All mortal men this day rejoice in Christ that you redeemed hath
Page No:
sig. B2r-B2v
Poem Title:
10. For Easter day
Attribution:
Iasper Haywood.
Attributed To:
Jasper Heywood
First Line:
Come holy ghost eternal God and ease the woeful grief
Page No:
sig. B2v
Poem Title:
11. For Whitsunday
Attribution:
F.K.
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
Sweet were the joys that both might like and last
Page No:
sig. B3r
Poem Title:
12. No pleasure without some pain.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
My friend if thou wilt credit me in ought
Page No:
sig. B3r-B3v
Poem Title:
13. Who minds to bring his ship to happy shore, Must care to know the laws of wisdom lore.
Attribution:
Iesper Haywood.
Attributed To:
Jasper Heywood
First Line:
If Fortune be thy stay thy state is very tickle
Page No:
sig. B4r
Poem Title:
14. Of the unconstant stay of Fortune's gifts.
Attribution:
F.K.
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
In my accompt the promise that is vowed
Page No:
sig. B4r-B4v
Poem Title:
15. Promise is debt.
Attribution:
R. Hill
Attributed To:
Richard Hill
First Line:
The wrong is great the pain above my power
Page No:
sig. B4v
Poem Title:
16. No words, but deeds
Attribution:
R.D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The day delayed of that I most do wish
Page No:
sig. C1r-C1v
Poem Title:
17. He desireth exchange of life.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
When I look back and in myself behold
Page No:
sig. C1v-C2r
Poem Title:
18. Of the instability of youth.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
By painted words the silly simple man
Page No:
sig. C2r-C2v
Poem Title:
19. Most happy is that state alone, where words and deed agree in one.
Attribution:
F.K.
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
The poor that live in needy rate by learning do great richness gain
Page No:
sig. C2v
Poem Title:
20. Who will aspire to dignity by learning must advanced be.
Attribution:
F.K.
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
The sturdy rock for all his strength by raging seas is rent in twain
Page No:
sig. C3r
Poem Title:
21. Man's flitting life sinds surest stay where sacred virtue beareth sway.
Attribution:
M.T.
Attributed To:
M. Thorn
First Line:
Since this our time of friendship is so scant
Page No:
sig. C3r-C3v
Poem Title:
22. Nothing is comparable unto a faithful friend.
Attribution:
F. Kindlemarsh
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
Perhaps you think me bold that dare presume to teach
Page No:
sig. C3v-C4r
Poem Title:
Golden Precepts
Attribution:
A. Boucher
Attributed To:
Arthur Bourcher
First Line:
The deep turmoiled wight that lives devoid of ease
Page No:
sig. C4r-C4v
Poem Title:
In praise of the snail
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To be as wise as Cato was or rich as Cresus in his life
Page No:
sig. C4v-D1r
Poem Title:
21. Remember thy end.
Attribution:
D.S.
Attributed To:
D. Sand
First Line:
Why art thou bound and mayest go free shall reason yield to raging will
Page No:
sig. D1r-D1v
Poem Title:
24. He persuadeth his friend from the fond effects of love.
Attribution:
Tho. Churchyard.
Attributed To:
Thomas Churchyard
First Line:
The sailing ships with joy at length do touch their long desired port
Page No:
sig. D1v
Poem Title:
25. Wanting his desire he complaineth.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
In friends are found a heap of doubts that double dealing use
Page No:
sig. D1v-D2r
Poem Title:
28. Try before you trust.
Attribution:
D.S.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If pleasures be in painfulness In pleasures doth my body rest
Page No:
sig. D2r
Poem Title:
27. A lady forsaketh complaineth.
Attribution:
M.D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Forlorn in filthy froward fate wherein a thousand cares I find
Page No:
sig. D2r-D2v
Poem Title:
28. Finding worldly joys but vanities, he wisheth death.
Attribution:
F.M.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I read a Maying rhyme of late delighted much my ear
Page No:
sig. D2v
Poem Title:
A reply to M. Edward's May
Attribution:
M.S.
Attributed To:
Master Sands
First Line:
In youth when I at large did lead my life in lusty liberty
Page No:
sig. D3r-D3v
Poem Title:
30. Having married a worthy lady, and taken away by death, he complaineth his mishap.
Attribution:
F.G.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Mistrust not troth that truly means for every jealous freak
Page No:
sig. D3v
Poem Title:
31. A worthy ditty, song before the queen's majesty at Bristow.
Attribution:
D.S.
Attributed To:
D. Sand
First Line:
You muses wear your mourning weeds strike on the fatal drum
Page No:
sig. D3v-E1r
Poem Title:
32. An Epitaph upon the death of Sir Edward Saunders Knight, Lord chief Baron of the Exchequer.
Attribution:
Lodowicke Lloyd.
Attributed To:
Lodowick Lloyd
First Line:
Fram'd in the front of forlorn hope past all recovery
Page No:
sig. E1r-E1v
Poem Title:
33. His good name being blemished, he bewaileth.
Attribution:
E.O.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Polycrates whose passing hap caused him to lose his fate
Page No:
sig. E1v
Poem Title:
34. Of Fortune's Power.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Whoso doth mark the careless life of these unhappy days
Page No:
sig. E1v-E2r
Poem Title:
36. Though triumph after bloody wars, the greatest brags do bear, yet triumph of a conquered mind, the crown of fame shall wear:
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Whoso will be accompted wise and truly claim the same
Page No:
sig. E2r-E2v
Poem Title:
37. Of perfect wisdom
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Ye stately wights that live in quiet rest
Page No:
sig. E2v-E3r
Poem Title:
38. A friendly admonition
Attribution:
R. Hill
Attributed To:
Richard Hill
First Line:
In every wight some sundry sort of pleasure I do find
Page No:
sig. E3r-E3v
Poem Title:
39. Sundry men, sundry affects
Attribution:
R. Hill
Attributed To:
Richard Hill
First Line:
A faithful friend is rare to find a fawning foe may soon be got
Page No:
sig. E3v
Poem Title:
40. Of a friend and a flatterer.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
To seem for to revenge each wrong in hasty wise
Page No:
sig. E4r
Poem Title:
41. Of sufferance cometh ease.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
Although the purple morning brags in brightness of the sun
Page No:
sig. E4r-E4v
Poem Title:
43. All things are vain
Attribution:
F. Kindlemarsh
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
I am a virgin fair and free and freely do rejoice
Page No:
sig. E4v-F1r
Poem Title:
44. A virtuous gentlewoman in the praise of her love.
Attribution:
F.K.
Attributed To:
Francis Kindlemarsh
First Line:
If fortune may enforce the careful heart to cry
Page No:
sig. F1r-F2r
Poem Title:
45. Oppressed with sorrow, he wisheth death.
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I sigh why so for sorrow of her smart
Page No:
sig. F2v-F3v
Poem Title:
47. Where reason makes request, there wisdom ought supply with friendly answer pressed, to grant or else deny.
Attribution:
My luck is losse.
Attributed To:
George Gascoigne
First Line:
The faith that fails must needs be thought untrue
Page No:
sig. F3v-F4r
Poem Title:
48. What joy a contented mind.
Attribution:
My luck is losse.
Attributed To:
George Gascoigne
First Line:
Even as the raven the crow and greedy kite
Page No:
sig. F4r
Poem Title:
49. Donec eris Faelix multos numerabis amicos, Nullus ad amissas ibit amicus opes.
Attribution:
My luck is losse.
Attributed To:
George Gascoigne
First Line:
In going to my naked bed as one that would have slept
Page No:
sig. F4r-F4v
Poem Title:
50. Amantium irae amoris redinte gratio est.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
The life is long which loathsomely do last
Page No:
sig. F4v-G1r
Poem Title:
51. Think to die
Attribution:
D.S.
Attributed To:
D. Sand
First Line:
If thou delight in quietness of life
Page No:
sig. G1v
Poem Title:
51. If thou desire to live in quiet rest, give ear and see, but say the best.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
Why should I linger long to live
Page No:
sig. G1v-G2r
Poem Title:
52. Being forsaken of his friend, he complaineth.
Attribution:
E.S.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whoso is set in princely throne and craveth rule to bear
Page No:
sig. G2r-G2v
Poem Title:
45. Prudence. The history of Damacles, and Dionise.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Each one deserves great praise to have but yet not like I think
Page No:
sig. G2v-G3r
Poem Title:
55. Fortitude. A young man of Egypt and Valerian.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Let rulers make most perfect laws to rule both great and small
Page No:
sig. G3r-G3v
Poem Title:
56. Justice, Zaleuch and his son
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
If nature bear thee so great love that she in thee have beauty placed
Page No:
sig. G3v-G4r
Poem Title:
57. Temperance, Spurina and the Romaine Ladies
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
If that each flower the gods have framed or shape by sacred skill
Page No:
sig. G4r-G4v
Poem Title:
58. A branch of herbs and flowers
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Where griping grief the heart would wound a doleful dumps the mind oppress
Page No:
sig. G4v
Poem Title:
59. In commendation of music
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My eye why doest thou light on that which was not thine
Page No:
sig. H1r
Poem Title:
60. A dialogue between the author and his eye
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
The coney in his cave the ferret doth annoy
Page No:
sig. H1r-H1v
Poem Title:
64. Finding no joy, he desired death
Attribution:
W. Hunnis
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In hope the shipman hoisteth sail in hope of passage good
Page No:
sig. H1v
Poem Title:
Hope well and have well.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
The mountains high whose lofty tops doth meet the haughty sky
Page No:
sig. H1v-H2r
Poem Title:
He requesteth some friendly comfort affirming his constancy.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Shall rigour reign where ruth hath run shall fancy now forsake
Page No:
sig. H2r-H2v
Poem Title:
He complaineth his mishap.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
I would it were not as I think I would it were not so
Page No:
sig. H2r-H2v
Poem Title:
No foe to a flatterer
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
The spider with great skill doth travail day by day
Page No:
sig. H2v
Poem Title:
His comparison of love
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
I have no joy but dream of joy and joy to think on joy
Page No:
sig. H2v-H3r
Poem Title:
A lover's joy
Attribution:
F. K.
Attributed To:
Edward Kindlemarsh
First Line:
The subtle slyly slights that worldly men do work
Page No:
sig. H3r
Poem Title:
Evil to him that evil thinketh
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
With painted speech I list not prove my cunning for to try
Page No:
sig. H3r-H3v
Poem Title:
He affirmeth his constancy.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
The fire shall freeze the frost shall fry the frozen mountains high
Page No:
sig. H3v-H4r
Poem Title:
Complaining of his mishap to his friend, he complaineth wittily.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Like as the doleful dove delights alone to be
Page No:
sig. H4r
Poem Title:
No pains comparable to his attempt.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
Alack when I look back upon my youth that's past
Page No:
sig. H4r
Poem Title:
He repenteth his folly.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
How can the tree but waste and wither away
Page No:
sig. H4r-H4v
Poem Title:
No pleasure without some pain.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
In choice of friends what hap had I to choose one of siren's kind
Page No:
sig. H4v
Poem Title:
The fruit of fained friends.
Attribution:
M. Edwards.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
Shall I no way win you to grant my desire
Page No:
sig. H4v-I1r
Poem Title:
A dialogue between a gentleman and his love.
Attribution:
M, Edwards
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
What death may be compareth to love's
Page No:
sig. I1v-I2r
Poem Title:
Exclaiming upon his unkind love, his friend replieth wittily.
Attribution:
E. S.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A crown of bays shall that man wear
Page No:
sig. I2r
Poem Title:
The complaint of a lover wearing black and tawny
Attribution:
E.O.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In quest of my relief I find distress
Page No:
sig. I2r-I2v
Poem Title:
Finding no relief he complaineth thus
Attribution:
R. Hill
Attributed To:
Richard Hill
First Line:
Mine own good father thou art gone thine cares are stopped with clay
Page No:
sig. I2v-I3r
Poem Title:
Written upon the death of his especial good friend Master John Barnaby, who departed this life at Benstead, in the County of Southampton 25. January. 1579. Aetatis 76.
Attribution:
H.D.
Attributed To:
Henry Disle
First Line:
If care or skill could conquer vain desire
Page No:
sig. H3r-H3v
Poem Title:
Coelum non solum
Attribution:
E.O.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The trickling tears that falls along my cheeks
Page No:
sig. H3v-H4r
Poem Title:
A lover rejected, complaineth.
Attribution:
L.O.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I am not as I seem to benor when I smile I am not glad
Page No:
sig. H4r
Poem Title:
Not attaining his desire, he complaineth.
Attribution:
E. O
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Who seeks the way to win renown
Page No:
sig. H4r-H4v
Poem Title:
A young gentleman willing to travel into foreign parts being entreated to stay in England: wrote as followeth.
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In loathsome race pursued by slippery life
Page No:
sig. H4v - K1r
Poem Title:
No joy comparable to a quiet mind.
Attribution:
Candishe
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In search of things that secret are my mated muse began
Page No:
sig. K1r-K1v
Poem Title:
That love is requited by disdain.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
In wealth we see some wealthy men abound in wealth and most wealthily
Page No:
sig. K1v
Poem Title:
Of a contented state.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
William Hunnis
First Line:
If friendless faith if guiltless thought may shield
Page No:
sig.K1v-K2r
Poem Title:
Being disdained, he complaineth.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
The higher that the cedar tree unto the heavens do grow
Page No:
sig. K2r
Poem Title:
Of the mean estate.
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When all is done and said in the end thus shall you find
Page No:
sig. K2r-K2v
Poem Title:
Of a contented mind.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
To counsel my estate abandoned to the spoil
Page No:
sig. K2v
Poem Title:
Try before you trust.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
Like as the hart that lifteth up his ears
Page No:
sig. K2v-K3r
Poem Title:
He renounceth all the effects of love.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
When I behold the bier my last and posting horse
Page No:
sig. K3r-K3v
Poem Title:
Bethinking himself to his end, writeth thus.
Attribution:
L. Vaux.
Attributed To:
Thomas Vaux
First Line:
Enforced by love and fear to please and not offend
Page No:
sig. K3v-K4r
Poem Title:
Being in love, he complaineth.
Attribution:
R.L.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In terror's trap with thralldom thrust
Page No:
sig. K4r
Poem Title:
Being in trouble, he writeth thus.
Attribution:
W. Hunnis.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The bitter sweet that strains my yielded heart
Page No:
sig. K4r-K4v
Poem Title:
Being troubled in mind, he writeth as followeth.
Attribution:
I. Haywood.
Attributed To:
Jasper Heywood
First Line:
If thou in surety safe wilt sit
Page No:
sig. K4v-L1r
Poem Title:
Look or you leap.
Attribution:
I. Haywood.
Attributed To:
Jasper Heywood
First Line:
What is this world a net to snare the soul
Page No:
sig. L1r-L1v
Poem Title:
A description of the world.
Attribution:
G. Gask.
Attributed To:
George Whetstone
George Gascoigne
First Line:
What fond delight what fancies strange
Page No:
sig. L1v
Poem Title:
A witty and pleasant conceit
Attribution:
I.H.
Attributed To:
Jasper Heywood
First Line:
O heavenly God Oh father dear cast down thy tender eye
Page No:
sig. L2r
Poem Title:
The compaint of a sinner, and sung by the earl of Essex upon his death bed in Ireland.
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I rage in restless youth and ruins rule my days
Page No:
sig. L2r-L2v
Poem Title:
The fruit that springs from willful wits, is ruth and ruin rage and sure what headless youth commits, repentance rues in age.
Attribution:
Yloope
Attributed To:
Master Yloop
First Line:
In may by kind Dame nature wills all earthly wights to sing
Page No:
sig.L2v-L3r
Poem Title:
Master Edwards his I may not
Attribution:
Master Edwards his I may not
Attributed To:
Richard Edwards
First Line:
Oh soveraign salve of sin who dost my soul behold
Page No:
sig. L3r-L3v
Poem Title:
The complaint of a sorrowful soul.
Attribution:
I. Haywood.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The wandering youth whose race so rashly run
Page No:
sig. L3v-L4r
Poem Title:
Alluding his state to the sorrowful child.
Attribution:
I. Heywood.
Attributed To:
Jasper Heywood