Blacklight

The poetical preceptor; or, a collection of select pieces of poetry, extracted from the works of the most eminent English poets [T115504] [ECCO]

DMI number:
1325
Publication Date:
1777
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T115504
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW110631456
Shelfmark:
ECCO - nearest hard copy is in British Library.
Full Title:
THE | POETICAL PRECEPTOR; | OR, A | COLLECTION | OF | Select PIECES of POETRY; | Extracted from the Works of the most eminent | ENGLISH POETS, | PARTICULARLY, | ADDISON, | AKENSIDE, | ARMSTRONG, | CONGREVE, | COWLEY, | DRYDEN, | DYER, | GAY, | GRAY, | HILL, | JOHNSON, | BEN. JONSON, | LEE, | MALLET, | MASON, | MILTON, | OTWAY, | PARNELL, | PHILIPS, | POPE, | PRIOR, | ROWE, | SHAKESPEARE, | SHENSTONE, | SWIFT, | THOMSON, | TICKELL, | WALLER, | WHARTON, | WHITEHEAD, | WILKIE, | YOUNG, &c. | And calculated for the Use, not only of Schools, | but of private Gentlemen. | [double rule] | LONDON: Printed for STANLEY CROWDER, No, 12, [i]Pater-noster-Row.[/i] | MDCCLXXVII.
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Duodecimo
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: advertisement for 'The Polite Preceptor' [1 unnumbered page], preface [pp. iii-vi], contents [pp. vii-xvi]
Content/Publication
First Line:
Ye deep philosophers who can
Page No:
pp.1-3
Poem Title:
The Young Lady and Looking-Glass. A Fable.
Attribution:
Wilkie.
Attributed To:
William Wilkie
First Line:
A lion tired with state affairs
Page No:
pp.3-5
Poem Title:
The Lion, the Fox, and the Geese. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
A wolf with hunger fierce and bold
Page No:
pp.5-6
Poem Title:
The Shepherd's Dog and the Wolf. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
How fond are men of rule and place
Page No:
pp.6-7
Poem Title:
The Lion and the Cub. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
All upstarts insolent in place
Page No:
pp.7-8
Poem Title:
The Butterfly and Snail. A Fable. [Gay.]
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Is there a bard whom genius fires
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
The Persian, the Sun, and the Cloud. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Those who in quarrels interpose
Page No:
pp.10-11
Poem Title:
The Mastiffs. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
In other men we faults can spy
Page No:
pp.11-12
Poem Title:
The Turkey and the Ant. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
The man to Jove his suit preferred
Page No:
pp.12-13
Poem Title:
The Father and Jupiter. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
The lad of all sufficient merit
Page No:
pp.14-15
Poem Title:
The Cur, the Horse, and the Shepherd's Dog. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
I know you lawyers can with ease
Page No:
pp.15-18
Poem Title:
The Dog and the Fox. To a Lawyer. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
That man must daily wiser grow
Page No:
pp.18-22
Poem Title:
The Bear in a Boat. To A Coxcomb. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Hail happy land whose fertile grounds
Page No:
pp.22-26
Poem Title:
The Man, the Cat, the Dog, and the Fly. A Fable.... To My Native Country.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Begin my lord in early youth
Page No:
pp.26-29
Poem Title:
The Pack-horse and the Carrier. To A Young Nobleman. A Fable.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
I hold it rash at any time
Page No:
pp.29-37
Poem Title:
The Ape, the Parrot, and the Jack-daw. A Fable.
Attribution:
Wilkie.
Attributed To:
William Wilkie
First Line:
A Grecian youth of talents rare
Page No:
pp.37-38
Poem Title:
The Youth and the Philosopher. A Fable.
Attribution:
W. Whitehead
Attributed To:
William Whitehead
First Line:
My dears tis said in days of old
Page No:
pp.39-43
Poem Title:
The Bee, the Ant, and the Sparrow. A Fable. Address'd to Phebe and Kitty C. at Boarding School.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As two young bears in wanton mood
Page No:
pp.43-44
Poem Title:
The Bears and Bees. A Fable.
Attribution:
Merrick.
Attributed To:
James Merrick
First Line:
Whoever with curious eye has ranged
Page No:
pp.44-45
Poem Title:
The Monkies. A Tale.
Attribution:
Merrick.
Attributed To:
James Merrick
First Line:
To you whose groves protect the feathered choirs
Page No:
pp.45-48
Poem Title:
The Goldfinches. An Elegy.
Attribution:
Jago
Attributed To:
Richard Jago
First Line:
The spacious firmament on high
Page No:
pp.48-49
Poem Title:
An Ode on the Heavenly Bodies.
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
When all thy mercies O my God
Page No:
pp.49-51
Poem Title:
A Hymn on Gratitude.
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
How are thy servants blessed O lord
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
An Ode on Providence.
Attribution:
Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Tis not that rural sports alone invite
Page No:
pp.52-53
Poem Title:
The Employments of a Country-Life.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
O happy plains remote from wars alarms
Page No:
pp.55-57
Poem Title:
The Happiness of a Country-Life.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
O ye associate walkers o my friends
Page No:
pp.57-58
Poem Title:
The Advantages of Walking: The miserable fate of a Beau.
Attribution:
Gay
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Welcome to Baiae's streams ye sons of spleen
Page No:
pp.58-59
Poem Title:
Panacea: Or, The Grand Restorative.
Attribution:
Graves.
Attributed To:
Richard Graves
First Line:
Happy the man who his whole time doth bound
Page No:
pp.59-60
Poem Title:
Claudian's Old Man of Verona.
Attribution:
Cowley
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
Hail old patrician trees so great and good
Page No:
pp.60-62
Poem Title:
On Solitude.
Attribution:
Cowley.
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
Far in a wild unknown to public view
Page No:
pp.62-69
Poem Title:
The Hermit.
Attribution:
Parnell.
Attributed To:
Thomas Parnell
First Line:
In Britain's isle and Arthur's days
Page No:
pp.69-76
Poem Title:
A Fairy Tale, in the antient English Stile.
Attribution:
Parnell.
Attributed To:
Thomas Parnell
First Line:
I've often wished that I had clear
Page No:
pp.76-82
Poem Title:
The Misery of a Town-Life, and the Happiness of a Country-one; exemplified in the Story of the Town-Mouse and Country-Mouse.
Attribution:
Swift and Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
Jonathan Swift
First Line:
The curfew tolls the knell of parting day
Page No:
pp.82-87
Poem Title:
An Elegy written in a Country Church-Yard.
Attribution:
Gray.
Attributed To:
Thomas Gray
First Line:
Ye distant spires ye antique towers
Page No:
pp.87-90
Poem Title:
Ode on a distant Prospect of Eton College.
Attribution:
Gray.
Attributed To:
Thomas Gray
First Line:
Twas on a lofty vase's side
Page No:
pp.90-91
Poem Title:
Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat: Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes.
Attribution:
Gray.
Attributed To:
Thomas Gray
First Line:
Of folly vice disease men proud we see
Page No:
pp.92-93
Poem Title:
The various Effects of Pride.
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
The squire is proud to see his courser strain
Page No:
pp.93-94
Poem Title:
Character of a Fox-Hunter.
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
Warm in pursuit of foxes and renown
Page No:
pp.94-95
Poem Title:
Character of a Florist.
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
These all their care expend on outward show
Page No:
pp.95-96
Poem Title:
Character of a Fop and of a Sloven.
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
Not gaudy butterflies are Lico's game
Page No:
pp.96-97
Poem Title:
Character of a Levee-Hunter.
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
The languid lady next appears in state
Page No:
pp.97-98
Poem Title:
Affection of Delicacy ridiculed.
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
Can gold calm passion or make reason shine
Page No:
pp.98-99
Poem Title:
The Emptiness of Riches.
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
Say first of God above or man below
Page No:
pp.99-101
Poem Title:
The Ignorance of Man, with regard to the General Laws of the Universe, a Reason why he should be contented with his Present State.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Heaven from all creatures hides the book of fate
Page No:
pp.101-102
Poem Title:
Our Happiness partly owing to our Ignorance of Future Events, partly to our Hope of a Future State.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
What would this man now upward will he soar
Page No:
pp.103-104
Poem Title:
The Unreasonableness of our Complaints against Providence.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Far as creation's ample range extends
Page No:
pp.104-106
Poem Title:
Order and Subordination prevails through all the Works of God, which form one entire Whole.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Two principles in human nature reign
Page No:
pp.106-107
Poem Title:
The different Offices of Reason and Self-Love.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Modes of self love the passions we may call
Page No:
pp.108-113
Poem Title:
On the Passions.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Look round our world behold the chain of love
Page No:
pp.113-115
Poem Title:
The whole Universe one System of Society.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Nor think in nature's state they blindly trod
Page No:
p.115
Poem Title:
The State of Nature.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
See him from nature rising slow to art
Page No:
pp.116-117
Poem Title:
Reason instructed by Instinct in the Invention of Arts, and in Forms of Society.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Order is heaven's first law and this confessed
Page No:
pp.117-118
Poem Title:
The Gifts of Fortune unequally distributed: Happiness does not consist in the superabundance of these, but in Health, Peace, and Competence.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Honour and shame from no condition rise
Page No:
p.119
Poem Title:
Honour consists in acting our Part well.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Know then this truth enough for man to know
Page No:
pp.119-121
Poem Title:
Virtue the sole Foundation of Happiness.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Tis from high life high characters are drawn
Page No:
p.121
Poem Title:
Characters given according to the Rank of Men in the World.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Ah friend to dazzle let the vain design
Page No:
pp.122-123
Poem Title:
Advice to the Fair Sex.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Odious in woollen twould a saint provoke
Page No:
p.122
Poem Title:
Examples of the Strength of the Ruling Passion in the Hour of Death.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
But all our praises why should lords engross
Page No:
pp.123-124
Poem Title:
The Man of Ross.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
But most by numbers judge a poet's song
Page No:
pp.124-126
Poem Title:
On Versification.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Hector this heard returned without delay
Page No:
pp.126-130
Poem Title:
The parting of Hector and Andromache.
Attribution:
Pope's Homer's Iliad.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Descend ye nine descend and sing
Page No:
pp.131-135
Poem Title:
Ode for Music on St. Cecilia's Day.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Twas at the royal feast for Persia won
Page No:
pp.135-139
Poem Title:
Alexander's Feast; or the Power of Music: An Ode on St. Cecilia's Day.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
But o my muse what numbers wilt thou find
Page No:
pp.139-140
Poem Title:
Description of a Battle, illustrated by a sublime Comparison.
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Fixed at his post was each bold Ajax found
Page No:
pp.140-141
Poem Title:
The first Onset of a Battle, illustrated by a Noble Comparison.
Attribution:
Pope's Homer's Iliad.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Wherever thy navy spreads her canvas wings
Page No:
pp.141-142
Poem Title:
To the King on his Navy.
Attribution:
Waller.
Attributed To:
Edmund Waller
First Line:
Tell me what genius did the art invent
Page No:
p.142
Poem Title:
On the Invention of Letters.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The noble art to Cadmus owes its rise
Page No:
p.142
Poem Title:
The Answer.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye green-robed Dryads oft at dusky eve
Page No:
pp.143-150
Poem Title:
The Enthusiast; or the Lover of Nature.
Attribution:
J. Warton.
Attributed To:
Joseph Warton
First Line:
O parent of each lovely muse
Page No:
pp.150-154
Poem Title:
Ode to Fancy.
Attribution:
J. Wharton.
Attributed To:
Joseph Warton
First Line:
Hence loathed melancholy
Page No:
pp.154-159
Poem Title:
L'Allegro.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Hence vain deluding joys
Page No:
pp.159-164
Poem Title:
Il Penseroso.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Contentment parent of delight
Page No:
pp.164-167
Poem Title:
The Wish.
Attribution:
Green.
Attributed To:
Matthew Green
First Line:
Ere yet ingenuous youth thy steps retire
Page No:
pp.167-168
Poem Title:
Elegy to a Young Nobleman leaving the University.
Attribution:
Mason.
Attributed To:
William Mason
First Line:
Now jolly swains the harvest of your cares
Page No:
pp.169-174
Poem Title:
Sheep-shearing: Song on that occasion: Sheep-shearing Feast and Merriments.
Attribution:
Dyer.
Attributed To:
John Dyer
First Line:
From heaven my strains begin from heaven descends
Page No:
pp.177-178
Poem Title:
On Taste.
Attribution:
Akenside.
Attributed To:
Mark Akenside
First Line:
O blest of heaven whom not the languid songs
Page No:
pp.178-180
Poem Title:
The Pleasures arising from a Cultivated Imagination.
Attribution:
Akenside.
Attributed To:
Mark Akenside
First Line:
Say why was man so eminently raised
Page No:
pp.180-182
Poem Title:
On Greatness.
Attribution:
Akenside.
Attributed To:
Mark Akenside
First Line:
Call now to mind what high capacious powers
Page No:
pp.182-184
Poem Title:
On Novelty.
Attribution:
Akenside.
Attributed To:
Mark Akenside
First Line:
Behold the ways | Of heavens eternal destiny to man
Page No:
pp.184-187
Poem Title:
The Pain arising from Virtuous Emotions, attended with Pleasure.
Attribution:
Akenside.
Attributed To:
Mark Akenside
First Line:
Begin with gentle toils and as your nerves
Page No:
p.187
Poem Title:
On Exercise.
Attribution:
Armstrong.
Attributed To:
John Armstrong
First Line:
How to live happiest how avoid the pains
Page No:
pp.188-190
Poem Title:
Lessons of Widsom.
Attribution:
Armstrong.
Attributed To:
John Armstrong
First Line:
As rising from the vegetable world
Page No:
pp.190-195
Poem Title:
The Passion of the Groves.
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
But happy they the happiest of their kind
Page No:
pp.196-197
Poem Title:
Domestic Love and Happiness.
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Heavens what a goodly prospect spreads around
Page No:
pp.198-203
Poem Title:
A Panegyric on Great Britain.
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
These are thy blessings industry rough power
Page No:
pp.203-206
Poem Title:
The Blessings of Industry.
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Soon as the morning trembles over the sky
Page No:
pp.206-211
Poem Title:
A Harvest-Scene, with the Story of Palemon and Lavinia.
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Ah little think the gay licentious proud
Page No:
pp.211-212
Poem Title:
On the Miseries of Human Life.
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Of man's first disobedience and the fruit
Page No:
pp.212-214
Poem Title:
The Subject of Paradise Lost - Invocation of the Muse - Man's Disobedience - Loss of Paradise - Satan driven out of Heaven.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Thus Satan talking to his nearest mate
Page No:
pp.214-216
Poem Title:
Satan lying on the Burning Lake.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
He scarce had ceased when the superior fiend
Page No:
p.216
Poem Title:
Description of Satan's Shield and Spear.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Thus far these beyond
Page No:
pp.216-217
Poem Title:
Satan's pre-eminence above the other fallen Angels.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Anon out of the earth a fabric huge
Page No:
p.217
Poem Title:
Pandemonium.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Hail holy light offspring of heaven first born
Page No:
pp.217-219
Poem Title:
An Address to Light.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
O thou that with surpassing glory crowned
Page No:
pp.219-221
Poem Title:
Satan's Speech to the Sun.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
So on he fares and to the border comes
Page No:
pp.221-222
Poem Title:
Satan's approach to Paradise - That Place described.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
That day I oft remember when from sleep
Page No:
pp.223-225
Poem Title:
Eve gives an Account of what first befel her after her Creation.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Two of far nobler shape erect and tall
Page No:
p.223
Poem Title:
Satan's first sight of Adam and Eve.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Now came still evening on and twilight grey
Page No:
p.225
Poem Title:
A Description of Night.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
With thee conversing I forget all time
Page No:
pp.225-226
Poem Title:
Eve describes her Happiness in Adam's Company.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
While thus he spake the angelic squadron bright
Page No:
pp.226-227
Poem Title:
Rencounter between Gabriel and Satan in Paradise.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
These are thy glorious works parent of good
Page No:
pp.227-229
Poem Title:
The Morning Hymn of Adam and Eve.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
So spake the eternal father and fulfilled
Page No:
pp.229-230
Poem Title:
Raphael's descent from Heaven to Paradise.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
So saying a noble stroke he lifted high
Page No:
pp.231-232
Poem Title:
Encounter between Abdiel and Satan: Beginning of the first Battle of the Angels.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
They ended parle and both addressed for fight
Page No:
pp.232-233
Poem Title:
Encounter between Michael and Satan.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Descend from heaven Urania by that name
Page No:
pp.233-234
Poem Title:
Address to the Muse, Urania.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Meanwhile the son
Page No:
pp.235-236
Poem Title:
The Creation of the World described.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
First in his east the glorious lamp was seen
Page No:
pp.236-237
Poem Title:
The first appearance of the Sun and Moon.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Meanwhile the tepid caves and fens and shores
Page No:
pp.237-238
Poem Title:
The Creation of Birds described.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
As new waked from soundest sleep
Page No:
pp.238-240
Poem Title:
Adam gives an account of his Condition and Sentiments, immediately after his Creation.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Now heaven in all her glory shone and rolled
Page No:
p.238
Poem Title:
The Deity resolve to creates Man.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
Yet when I approach
Page No:
p.240
Poem Title:
Adam's description of Eve.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thus saying from her husband's hand her hand
Page No:
pp.241-243
Poem Title:
Eve parts with Adam. - The Serpent finds her; and is so strongly affected with her Beauty and Innocence, that he almost lays aside his hellish Design.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
O fairest of creation last and best
Page No:
pp.243-244
Poem Title:
Adam's Lamentation over Eve, upon her eating the forbidden Fruit; and his Resolution to share the same Fate with her.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
All the world's a stage
Page No:
pp.244-245
Poem Title:
The World compared to a Stage.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O unexpected stroke worse than of death
Page No:
p.244
Poem Title:
Eve's Lamentation upon her being doomed to quit Paradise.
Attribution:
Milton.
Attributed To:
John Milton
First Line:
For who shall go about
Page No:
pp.245-246
Poem Title:
Honour ought to be conferred on Merit only.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I'm never merry when I hear sweet music
Page No:
pp.246-247
Poem Title:
Music.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
The quality of mercy is not strained
Page No:
p.246
Poem Title:
Mercy.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I saw him beat the surges under him
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
Description of a Man swimming ashore.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
The lunatic the lover and the poet
Page No:
p.247
Poem Title:
The Power of Imagination.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Ay ay and she hath offered to the doom
Page No:
pp.248-249
Poem Title:
A beautiful Person petitioning in vain.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
She never told her love
Page No:
p.248
Poem Title:
Concealed Love.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
These our actors
Page No:
p.248
Poem Title:
The Vanity of Human Nature.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
The barge she sat in like a burnished throne
Page No:
pp.249-250
Poem Title:
Description of Cleopatra's sailing down the Cydnus.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O thou goddess
Page No:
p.250
Poem Title:
Inborn Royalty.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Seems madam nay it is I know not seems
Page No:
p.250
Poem Title:
Real Grief.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Angels and ministers of grace defend us
Page No:
pp.251-252
Poem Title:
Hamlet, on the Appearance of his Father's Ghost.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Give thy thoughts no tongue
Page No:
p.251
Poem Title:
A Father's Advice to his Son, going to travel.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
To be or not to be that is the question
Page No:
pp.252-253
Poem Title:
Hamlet's Soliloquy on Death.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
It must be so Plato thou reasonst well
Page No:
pp.253-254
Poem Title:
Cato's Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul.
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Nay do not think I flatter
Page No:
pp.254-255
Poem Title:
On Flattery, and firmness of Mind.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
My liege I did deny no prisoners
Page No:
pp.255-256
Poem Title:
Hotspur's Description of a finical Courtier.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
So shaken as we are so wan with care
Page No:
p.255
Poem Title:
Peace after Civil War.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I saw young Harry with his beaver on
Page No:
pp.256-257
Poem Title:
A gallent Warrior.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I from the orient to the drooping west
Page No:
p.257
Poem Title:
Rumour.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O gentle sleep
Page No:
pp.257-258
Poem Title:
On Sleep.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Hear him but reason in divinity
Page No:
pp.258-259
Poem Title:
King Henry the Fifth's Eloquence.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
So work the honey bees
Page No:
p.259
Poem Title:
The Common-wealth of Bees.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Suppose that you have seen
Page No:
pp.259-260
Poem Title:
Description of a Fleet setting sail.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
From camp to camp through the foul womb of night
Page No:
pp.260-261
Poem Title:
Description of Night in a Camp.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Methinks it were a happy life
Page No:
pp.261-262
Poem Title:
The Happiness of a Shepherd's Life.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
So farewell to the little good you bear me
Page No:
pp.262-263
Poem Title:
The Vicissitudes of Life.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Cromwell I did not think to shed a tear
Page No:
pp.263-264
Poem Title:
Cardinal Wolsey's Speech to Cromwell.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Old men and beldams in the streets
Page No:
p.264
Poem Title:
News-Tellers on the Death of Arthur.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
What is it that you would impart to me
Page No:
p.265
Poem Title:
Patriotism.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Why man he doth bestride the narrow world
Page No:
p.265
Poem Title:
Cassius in contempt of Caesar.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
But tis a common proof
Page No:
p.266
Poem Title:
Ambition, covered with specious Humility.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Cowards die many times before their deaths
Page No:
p.266
Poem Title:
Against the Fear of Death.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Friends Romans countrymen lend me your ears
Page No:
pp.266-267
Poem Title:
Antony's Funeral Oration upon Caesar.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
There is no terror Cassius in your threats
Page No:
pp.267-268
Poem Title:
Brutus to Cassius.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
There is a tide in the affairs of men
Page No:
p.268
Poem Title:
Opportunity to be seized in all Affairs.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
This was the noblest Roman of them all
Page No:
p.268
Poem Title:
Antony's Character of Brutus.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Blow winds and crack your cheeks rage blow
Page No:
pp.269-270
Poem Title:
Lear's passionate Exclamations amidst the Tempest.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Alas poor country
Page No:
pp.270-271
Poem Title:
An oppress'd Country.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Come on sir here's the place stand still how fearful
Page No:
p.270
Poem Title:
Description of Dover-Cliffe.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Most potent grave and reverent signiors
Page No:
pp.271-272
Poem Title:
Othello's Relation of his Courtship to the Senate.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
All places that the eye of heaven visits
Page No:
pp.273-274
Poem Title:
Banishment, Consolation under it.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Good name in man and woman dear my lord
Page No:
p.273
Poem Title:
Reputation.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Oh who can hold a fire in his hand
Page No:
p.274
Poem Title:
Thoughts ineffectual to moderate Afflictions.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
This royal throne of kings this sceptred isle
Page No:
pp.274-275
Poem Title:
England.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
For within the hollow crown
Page No:
pp.275-276
Poem Title:
On the Vanity of Power, and the Misery of Kings.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Knowest thou not
Page No:
p.275
Poem Title:
The Sun rising after a dark Night.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
In common worldly things tis called ungrateful
Page No:
p.276
Poem Title:
Submission to Heaven, our Duty.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O momentary grace of mortal men
Page No:
pp.276-277
Poem Title:
The Vanity of Trust in Man.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Princes have but their titles for their glories
Page No:
p.276
Poem Title:
The Cares of Royalty.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I called thee then poor shadow painted queen
Page No:
p.277
Poem Title:
Queen Margaret upbraiding Queen Anne, the Consort of Richard III.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O then I see Queen Mab hath been with you
Page No:
pp.277-278
Poem Title:
On Dreams.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I do remember an apothecary
Page No:
p.279
Poem Title:
Description of an Apothecary, and his Shop.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Why then you princes
Page No:
pp.279-280
Poem Title:
Adversity the Test of real Merit. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Now my comates and brothers in exile
Page No:
pp.280-281
Poem Title:
Solitude preferred to a Court Life, and the Advantages of Adversity. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
The youngest son of Priam a true knight
Page No:
p.280
Poem Title:
The Character of Troilus. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
A merrier man
Page No:
pp.281-282
Poem Title:
A Merry Man. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
But do not so I have five hundred crowns
Page No:
p.281
Poem Title:
Gratitude in an Old Servant. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Heaven doth with us as we with torches do
Page No:
p.282
Poem Title:
Virtue given to be Exerted. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I tell thee what Antonio
Page No:
p.282
Poem Title:
Affected Gravity. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
The world is still deceived with ornament
Page No:
p.283
Poem Title:
The Deceit of Ornament or Appearances. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Is all the council that we two have shared
Page No:
p.284
Poem Title:
Female Friendship. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Where I have come great clerks have purposed
Page No:
pp.284-285
Poem Title:
Youthful Innocence. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Give me the cup
Page No:
pp.285-286
Poem Title:
A Health. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
In the corrupted currents of this world
Page No:
p.285
Poem Title:
Part of the King's despairing Soliloquy in Hamlet. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O hard condition and twin born with greatness
Page No:
pp.286-287
Poem Title:
The Miseries of Royalty. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O polished perturbation golden care
Page No:
p.286
Poem Title:
Reflections on a Crown. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Her vine the merry cheerer of the heart
Page No:
pp.287-288
Poem Title:
The Miseries of War. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Be thou blest Bertram and succeed thy father
Page No:
p.288
Poem Title:
Advice. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted
Page No:
p.288
Poem Title:
A good Conscience. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
From lowest place when virtuous things proceed
Page No:
p.289
Poem Title:
Honour due to personal Merit, not to Birth. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
[Shakespeare.]
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Let's take the instant by the forward top
Page No:
p.289
Poem Title:
Against Delay. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Under an oak whose boughs were mossed with age
Page No:
pp.289-290
Poem Title:
A fine Description of a sleeping Man, about to be destroyed by a Snake and a Lioness. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
A hungry lean-faced villain
Page No:
p.290
Poem Title:
Description of a beggarly Conjurer or a Fortune-teller. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
No ceremony that to great ones belongs
Page No:
p.290
Poem Title:
Mercy in Governors commended. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
England never did nor ever shall
Page No:
p.291
Poem Title:
England, invincible, if unanimous. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Ever note Lucilius
Page No:
pp.291-292
Poem Title:
Ceremony insincere. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
You were used
Page No:
p.291
Poem Title:
Precepts against Ill-fortune. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I was with Hercules and Cadmus once
Page No:
p.292
Poem Title:
Hounds and Hunting. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O you hard hearts you cruel men of Rome
Page No:
pp.292-293
Poem Title:
Popular Ingratitude and Curiosity. [Shakespeare.]
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Behold the African
Page No:
p.293
Poem Title:
The Life of an African. [Addison.]
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Let us appear nor rash nor diffident
Page No:
pp.293-294
Poem Title:
Cato's Address to the Senate. [Addison.]
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Portius draw near my son thou oft has seen
Page No:
pp.294-295
Poem Title:
Cato's Advice to his Son. [Addison.]
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Remember o my friends the laws the rights
Page No:
p.294
Poem Title:
Cato's Advice to his Friends. [Addison.]
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
So where our wide Numidian wastes extend
Page No:
p.294
Poem Title:
Description of a Hurricane. [Addison.]
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Ambition is the stamp impressed by heaven
Page No:
pp.295-296
Poem Title:
Ambition inseparable from Great Minds. [S. Johnson.]
Attribution:
S. Johnson.
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
This were to lose the very end of being
Page No:
p.295
Poem Title:
Action opposed to Contemplation. [Bellers.]
Attribution:
Bellers.
Attributed To:
Fettiplace Bellers
First Line:
If there be any land as fame reports
Page No:
pp.296-297
Poem Title:
The Happiness of a free Government. [S. Johnson.]
Attribution:
S. Johnson.
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
No government can ever be safe that's founded
Page No:
p.296
Poem Title:
The Unsteadiness of an arbitrary Government, and the Misery of a despotic Prince. [Trap.]
Attribution:
Trap.
Attributed To:
Joseph Trapp
First Line:
Forth from the thicket rushed another boar
Page No:
p.297
Poem Title:
The killing of a Boar. [Otway.]
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
We pursued the chase
Page No:
p.297
Poem Title:
The same. [Smith.]
Attribution:
Smith.
Attributed To:
Edmund Smith
First Line:
He preferred me
Page No:
p.298
Poem Title:
Rural Courtship. [Dryden.]
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
This ancient city
Page No:
p.298
Poem Title:
Description of a populous City. [Young.]
Attribution:
Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
Next night a dreary night
Page No:
p.299
Poem Title:
Description of a Person left on a desert Island. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
So the eagle
Page No:
p.299
Poem Title:
The first Feats of a young Eagle. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
And therefore wert thou bred to virtuous knowledge
Page No:
p.300
Poem Title:
The true End of Education. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Ever since reflection beamed her light upon me
Page No:
p.300
Poem Title:
Filial Piety. [Mallet.]
Attribution:
Mallet.
Attributed To:
David Mallet
First Line:
Have I then no tears for thee my father
Page No:
p.301
Poem Title:
The same. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Though plunged in ills and exercised in care
Page No:
p.301
Poem Title:
Despair never to be indulged. [Philips.]
Attribution:
Philips.
Attributed To:
Ambrose Philips
First Line:
With such unshaken temper of the soul
Page No:
p.301
Poem Title:
Bad Fortune more easily borne than Good. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
He who contends for freedom
Page No:
p.302
Poem Title:
A Friend to Freedom can never be a Traitor. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
In a close lane as I pursued my journey
Page No:
p.302
Poem Title:
Description of a Hag. [Otway.]
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
To be good is to be happy angels
Page No:
pp.302-303
Poem Title:
Happiness the inseparable Companion of Virtue. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Honour my lord is much too proud to catch
Page No:
p.303
Poem Title:
Honour superior to Justice. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Let truth and virtue be their earliest teachers
Page No:
p.303
Poem Title:
In what Manner Princes ought to be Taught. [Mallet.]
Attribution:
Mallet.
Attributed To:
David Mallet
First Line:
O witness heaven
Page No:
p.304
Poem Title:
True End of Royalty. [Mallet.]
Attribution:
Mallet.
Attributed To:
David Mallet
First Line:
Tis true I am a king
Page No:
p.304
Poem Title:
The real Duty of a King. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
When those whom heaven distinguishes over millions
Page No:
pp.305-306
Poem Title:
The Guilt of bad Kings. [Mallet.]
Attribution:
Mallet.
Attributed To:
David Mallet
First Line:
Yes we have lost a father
Page No:
p.305
Poem Title:
Character of a good King. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Reflect that life and death affecting sounds
Page No:
p.306
Poem Title:
The same. [S. Johnson.]
Attribution:
S. Johnson.
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
The prince in a lone court was placed
Page No:
pp.306-307
Poem Title:
A Lion overcome by a Man. [Lee.]
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Who who would live my Narva just to breathe
Page No:
p.306
Poem Title:
The true End of Life. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
How could my tongue
Page No:
p.307
Poem Title:
Character of an excellent Man. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
I tell thee then whoever amidst the sons
Page No:
pp.307-308
Poem Title:
Virtue the only true Source of Nobility. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Wished morning's come and now upon the plains
Page No:
p.308
Poem Title:
A Description of the Morning. [Otway.]
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
From amber shrouds I see the morning rise
Page No:
p.309
Poem Title:
Another. [Lee.]
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
So when the spring renews the flowery field
Page No:
pp.309-310
Poem Title:
The same. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Thus in some poplar shade the nightingale
Page No:
p.309
Poem Title:
The charming Notes of the Nightingale. [Lee.]
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
His only blot was this that much provoked
Page No:
p.310
Poem Title:
The Love of our Country the greatest of Virtues. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
Were honour to be scanned by long descent
Page No:
p.310
Poem Title:
A worthless Person can claim no Merit from the Virtues of his Ancestors. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Thomas Rowe
First Line:
Learn hence ye Romans on how sure a base
Page No:
p.311
Poem Title:
The same. [W. Whitehead.]
Attribution:
W. Whitehead.
Attributed To:
William Whitehead
First Line:
Philosophy consists not
Page No:
p.311
Poem Title:
In what Philosophy really consists. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
What with admiration
Page No:
pp.311-313
Poem Title:
Scipio restoring the captive Princess to her Royal Lover. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
O beauteous peace
Page No:
pp.313-314
Poem Title:
The Blessings of Peace. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
As far as I could cast my eyes
Page No:
pp.314-315
Poem Title:
Description of Ships appearing at a Distance, and approaching the Shore. [Dryden.]
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Let us
Page No:
p.314
Poem Title:
Prudence. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
There is a power
Page No:
p.314
Poem Title:
Providence. [Thomson.]
Attribution:
Thomson.
Attributed To:
James Thomson
First Line:
What though no gaudy titles grace my birth
Page No:
p.315
Poem Title:
Virtue preferable to Rank. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
He comes and with a port so proud
Page No:
pp.316-317
Poem Title:
Description of a Triumph. [Lee.]
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Tis dreadful | how reverend is the face of this tall pile
Page No:
p.316
Poem Title:
Description of an ancient Cathedral. [Congreve.]
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Great minds like heaven are pleased with doing good
Page No:
p.317
Poem Title:
Virtue its own Reward. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
The unbusied shepherd stretched beneath the hawthorn
Page No:
p.317
Poem Title:
A Shepherd's Life happier than a King's. [Hill.]
Attribution:
Hill.
Attributed To:
Aaron Hill
First Line:
Ah me full sorely is my heart forlorn
Page No:
pp.318-328
Poem Title:
The School-Mistress. In Imitation of Spencer. [Shenstone.]
Attribution:
Shenstone.
Attributed To:
William Shenstone
First Line:
The wise and active conquer difficulties
Page No:
p.318
Poem Title:
No Difficulties insuperable to the Prudent and Brave. [Rowe.]
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
While you my lord the rural shades admire
Page No:
pp.328-333
Poem Title:
A Letter from Italy, to the Right Honourable Charles Lord Halifax, in the Year 1701. [Addison.]
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
If dumb too long the drooping muse hath stayed
Page No:
pp.333-336
Poem Title:
To the Earl of Warwick, on the Death of Mr. Addison. [Tickell.]
Attribution:
Tickell.
Attributed To:
Thomas Tickell
First Line:
Of Leinster famed for maidens fair
Page No:
pp.336-338
Poem Title:
Colin and Lucy. A Ballad. [Tickell.]
Attribution:
Tickell.
Attributed To:
Thomas Tickell
First Line:
Happy the man who void of cares and strife
Page No:
pp.339-343
Poem Title:
The Splendid Shilling. An Imitation of Milton. [J. Philips.]
Attribution:
J. Philips.
Attributed To:
John Philips
First Line:
Tomorrow didst thou say
Page No:
pp.343-344
Poem Title:
To-Morrow. [Dr. Cotton.]
Attribution:
Dr. Cotton.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Cotton
First Line:
Nobles and heralds by your leave
Page No:
p.344
Poem Title:
Epitaph. [Prior.]
Attribution:
Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
Underneath this stone doth lie
Page No:
p.344
Poem Title:
Epitaph. [Ben. Jonson.]
Attribution:
Ben. Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson