Blacklight

The polite miscellany containing variety of food for the mind [T117528] [ecco]

DMI number:
942
Publication Date:
1764
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T117528
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW116341649
Shelfmark:
ECCO - Bod
Full Title:
THE | POLITE MISCELLANY: | CONTAINING | Variety of Food for the Mind; | BEING AN | ELEGANT COLLECTION | OF | Moral Humorous, and Improving Essays, &c. | BOTH IN PROSE AND VERSE. | AMONG WHICH ARE, | [2 columns] [col1] Reflections on Courtship and | Marriage, | IV. Oriental Eclogues | Remarkable Anecdotes, or se- | cret Histories of Eminent | Persons, | Extracts from the Works of Voltair, Churchill & other | great Genius's, | Rules for the Conduct of Life, | and Sayings of Wise Men, | Select Histories, [/col1] | [col2] Striking Characters, | Instructive Letters, | Dialogues on Toleration and | Travel, | Receipts in Physic and other | Art and Sciences, | Improvements in Husbandry, | Inscriptions on Monuments, | &c. | Fables, Pastorals, Elegies, E- | pitaphs, and Epigrams, [/col2] | With many other curious Articles, by the best Authors. | [rule] | [epitaph] | [double rule] | MANCHESTER: | Printed by R. WHITWORTH, MDCCLXIV.
Epigraph:
[i]Above the rest that Author hits the White | Who strives to mingle Profit with Delight.[/i]
Place of Publication:
Manchester
Genres:
Periodical miscellany
Format:
Octavo
Bibliographic details:
Appears to have been originally printed and sold in parts of 8pp. These are undated.
Comments:
Contents: contains prose and verse. Some of the prose contains verse extracts; only those 4 lines or longer have been indexed
Other matter:
Back matter: Index [4pp.]
Related People
Printer:
Robert Whitworth
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Thou who the verdant plain dost traverse here
Page No:
p.17
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
by the ingenious dr. Akinside
Attributed To:
Mark Akenside
First Line:
When Pope to satire gave its lawful way
Page No:
p.17
Poem Title:
Verses written in Windsor Park.
Attribution:
By C. Churchill.
Attributed To:
Charles Churchill
First Line:
Ye shepherds who pitied my pain
Page No:
p.18
Poem Title:
A Pastoral Song. To the tune of, What shepherd or nymph of the grove, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Captive brother break thy chain
Page No:
pp.20-21
Poem Title:
The Squirrels of Hagley (a seat of Lord Littleton's) to Miss Warbutton's Squirrel.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Happy the man who verses in nature's laws
Page No:
p.28
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My passion Sylvia to prove
Page No:
p.37
Poem Title:
On a Lady's asking a Gentleman how much he loved her. To Miss ------.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Far other views chill winter's hand displays
Page No:
pp.43-45
Poem Title:
From The Alps. A Poem.
Attribution:
By George Keate, Esq; 1763.
Attributed To:
George Keate
First Line:
Thus the gay victime with fresh garlands crowned
Page No:
p.46
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
mr. Philips
Attributed To:
Ambrose Philips
First Line:
Fiction and truth have both an instance given
Page No:
p.48
Poem Title:
The Power of Beauty.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Over this fair shrine let not a tear be shed
Page No:
p.48
Poem Title:
Epitaph. On a Monument by Vannost, erected in the Cathedral of Waterford. To the Memory of Mrs. Susannah Mason.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Over moorlands and mountains rude barren and bare
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
Content. A Pastoral.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Not like my brethren was I bid to tell
Page No:
pp.52-53
Poem Title:
Inscription on the Monument of an Horse ... The Monument speaks
Attribution:
By J. Carr
Attributed To:
J. Carr
First Line:
Struck with his charms whom all admire
Page No:
pp.62-63
Poem Title:
Imagination's Search after Happiness. An Allegorical Fable.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If while dim clouds their lustre shade
Page No:
p.64
Poem Title:
To a young Lady sick of a Cold.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Young as I am I've often heard it said
Page No:
p.64
Poem Title:
The following Epilogue was spoke by Miss Fanny Wheeler; to a very polite Audience at the Theatre in Shrewsbury, Sept. 12, 1763.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Once on a summer's golden day
Page No:
pp.67-69
Poem Title:
The Two Butterflies. A Fable. Recommended to the Perusal of two certain Ladies in Manchester.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let prudence with good nature strive
Page No:
p.73
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
by the ingenious Dr. Swift
Attributed To:
Jonathan Swift
First Line:
Let harmony reign
Page No:
p.79-80
Poem Title:
Second Song.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh that the muse might call without offence
Page No:
p.79
Poem Title:
Spoke extempore at Buxton Wells ... to an Officer who swore much in vindication of the Duke of Cumberland's behaviour in Scotland.
Attribution:
by the late Dr. Byrom
Attributed To:
John Byrom
First Line:
To peace and love in courts but seldom seen
Page No:
p.79
Poem Title:
Two Songs sung at the Musical Entertainment, &c. given at the Queen's Palace, June 6, 1763, in honour d his Majesty's Birth-day. First Song.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The sprightly herald of the new born day
Page No:
p.80
Poem Title:
Morning.
Attribution:
R. C.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of gentle manners and of taste refined
Page No:
p.81
Poem Title:
To the Memory of the late ingenious Dr. Byrom.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Both make the public good thier plea
Page No:
p.82
Poem Title:
Epigram on the two contending Parties.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If P--t accepts tis plain he wants a place
Page No:
p.82
Poem Title:
An Hard Case.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
One day behind my lady's back
Page No:
p.82
Poem Title:
Epigram. From Monsieur St. Gelais
Attribution:
by Mr. C. Dennis.
Attributed To:
C Dennis
First Line:
Says Forbes to Wilkes ye are a scoondrel
Page No:
p.82
Poem Title:
On Forbes's Challenge to Wilkes.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Authorities both old and recent
Page No:
p.89
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I hope it won't be termed rude
Page No:
pp.93-95
Poem Title:
An Epistle to a remote Friend, Long since retired from Business.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While modern tragedy by rule exact
Page No:
p.96
Poem Title:
Prologue to Philaster ... now acting at Drury Lane, London.
Attribution:
written by George Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Accept this humble strain most noble lord
Page No:
pp.100-102
Poem Title:
To his Excellency the Earl of Northumberland, Viceroy of Ireland.
Attribution:
Devanus.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye persian maids attend your poet's lays
Page No:
pp.102-104
Poem Title:
From the Oriental Eclogues. Eclogue I. Selim; or, the Shepeherd's [sic] Moral. Scene, a Valley near Bagdat. Time, the Morning
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ah say my soul why so overwhelmed with grief
Page No:
pp.111-112
Poem Title:
A Soliloquy. Written some Time ago, when the much-injured Author fell a Victim to Bigotry and Malice.
Attribution:
the much-injured Author
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
That votes for money now are sold
Page No:
p.112
Poem Title:
Epigram on Bribery in P------.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I intend these lines for Gabriel Rybault
Page No:
p.113
Poem Title:
A Letter, with the following Direction on it was lately put into the General Post-Office, in London, for which the Postage was paid.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In silent horror over the boundless waste
Page No:
p.113
Poem Title:
From the Oriental Eclogues. Eclogue II. Hassan; or, the Camel-driver. Scene, the Desart. Time, Mid-day.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
It is indeed a melancholy truth
Page No:
pp.124-125
Poem Title:
Punctillius. A Tale.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In Georgia's land where Tefflis' towers are seen
Page No:
pp.134-136
Poem Title:
From the Oriental Eclogues. Eclogue III. Abra; or, the Georgian Sultana. Scene, a Forest. Time, the Evening.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While George in sorrow bows his laurelled head
Page No:
p.135
Poem Title:
Epitaph on General Wolfe, In the Church of Westerham, in Kent.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Say dearest friend how roll thy hours away
Page No:
pp.141-144
Poem Title:
To the Reverend Dr. Aycough, at Oxford. Writ from Paris, Anno 1728.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As grateful in spring are the flowers to the bee
Page No:
p.145
Poem Title:
A Song. Collin and Jenney.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Marcus old friend accept from me
Page No:
pp.146-147
Poem Title:
A Recipee for an Asthma.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
These and what other blessings I possess
Page No:
p.152
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
C. Churchill
Attributed To:
Charles Churchill
First Line:
Thou god of truth thou great all searching eye
Page No:
p.152
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
C. Churchill
Attributed To:
Charles Churchill
First Line:
Long silent lies the muse's lyre
Page No:
pp.159-160
Poem Title:
Shenstone's Gardens. An Elegy. Written in the Autumn, 1763. Addressed to Mr. Hodgetts, at the Leasowes.
Attribution:
Philander.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How do I laugh when men of narrow souls
Page No:
pp.165-168
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
By C. Churchill.
Attributed To:
Charles Churchill
First Line:
In fair Circassia where to love inclined
Page No:
pp.175-176
Poem Title:
From the Oriental Eclogues. Eclogue IV. Agib and Secander; or, the Fugitives. Scene a Mountain in Circassia. Time, Midnight.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Great father king and only lord
Page No:
pp.182-183
Poem Title:
A Paraphrase on the Lord's Prayer.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Favourite of Venus and the tuneful nine
Page No:
pp.183-184
Poem Title:
An Epistle to Lord H----y.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Jove quite tired out with a scold of a wife
Page No:
p.184
Poem Title:
The Scold.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Such hearts as ours were never paired above
Page No:
p.185
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hark my gay friend that solemn toll
Page No:
pp.190-192
Poem Title:
The Unknown World; Occasion'd by hearing a Passing Bell.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Fidelity though now no more
Page No:
p.192
Poem Title:
Fidelity.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our god and soldiers we alike adore
Page No:
p.192
Poem Title:
Ingratitude.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The counsels of a friend Belinda hear
Page No:
pp.198-200
Poem Title:
Advice to Belinda.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My dearest miss with all submission
Page No:
p.200
Poem Title:
To Miss S-------.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What we must all come to what come to what
Page No:
p.201
Poem Title:
Epilogue To What We Must All Come To. Spoken by Miss Elliot.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hark hark over the plains what glad tumults we hear
Page No:
pp.215-216
Poem Title:
The following Pastoral Dialogue, was sung, then, by Mr. Beard and Miss Hallam. Collin and Phillis.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Beneath an infant sleeping lies
Page No:
p.216
Poem Title:
An Epitaph.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Right thus honourable and so forth whereas tis confessed
Page No:
pp.222-223
Poem Title:
To the Right Honorable George Bub Doddington
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Pensive I lay even from the dead of night
Page No:
p.224
Poem Title:
An Elegy on a Tallow Candle.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Philips whose touch harmonious could remove
Page No:
p.224
Poem Title:
Epitaph on Claudy Philips, Musician.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
See the leaves around us falling
Page No:
pp.231-232
Poem Title:
The Fall of the Leaf.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The midnight moon serenely smiles
Page No:
pp.238-240
Poem Title:
Enquiry After Happiness.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Gaily I lived as ease and nature taught
Page No:
p.240
Poem Title:
Reignier's Epitaph, made by himself.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While this gay toy attracts thy sight
Page No:
p.240
Poem Title:
To Miss ****. On a Watch.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Next sat a lawyer often tried
Page No:
pp.246-247
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Churchill's Duellist.
Attributed To:
Charles Churchill
First Line:
Fair as the dawning light auspicious guest
Page No:
pp.255-256
Poem Title:
On Chearfulness.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How pleasing dear wedlock appear thy domains
Page No:
pp.262-264
Poem Title:
Hymen; a new occasional Interlude, as it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-lane, London. The Overture composed by Mr. Potter ... The Music by Mr. Arne, jun.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If there be joy for me
Page No:
p.264
Poem Title:
A Song.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thus live and love ye happy fair
Page No:
p.265
Poem Title:
A New Occasional Song, Introduced in the Rites of Hecate; And Sung by Mr. Vernon.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh that I had my innocence again
Page No:
p.266
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What that is wronged like me can sit down tamely
Page No:
p.266
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
And now to know no thought of rest
Page No:
p.267
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Yet not over nature spread the general traits
Page No:
pp.276-277
Poem Title:
A Panegyric upon Britain, from Mr. Ogilvie's Poem of Providence; being the conclusion of Book I.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How much mistaken are the men who think
Page No:
pp.287-291
Poem Title:
Introduction to Gotham, a Poem. Book II.
Attribution:
By C. Churchill.
Attributed To:
Charles Churchill
First Line:
Urania o descend
Page No:
pp.303-304
Poem Title:
An Elegy on the Death of the Right Honourable Earl Hardwicke.
Attribution:
By T. Archer, a youth under fourteen years of age, nephew to Francis Dixon, Esq; of Upwell.
Attributed To:
T. Archer
First Line:
Why mourns my friend why weeps his downcast eye
Page No:
pp.309-311
Poem Title:
Elegy, Describing the Sorrow of an ingenious Mind, on the melancholy Even t of a licentious Amour.
Attribution:
By the late Mr. Shenstone.
Attributed To:
William Shenstone
First Line:
I must I will have gin that skillet take
Page No:
p.315
Poem Title:
Strip-Me-Naked, orr Royal Gin Forever: A Simile.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Come sit by my side while this picture I draw
Page No:
p.327
Poem Title:
A Portrait from the Life
Attribution:
By Dean Swift, not published in his Works.
Attributed To:
Jonathan Swift
First Line:
Nor high church nor low church nor Tory nor Whig
Page No:
pp.327-328
Poem Title:
The Character of an Honest Man.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Behold O stranger new from foreign lands
Page No:
p.328
Poem Title:
On the Bustos of Sir Isaac Newton, Mr. Locke, &c. set up by her late Majesty Queen Caroliine in the Hermitage at Richmond.
Attribution:
Epigraph: -------Sui memores alios fecere merendo.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since the times are so bad and are still growing worse
Page No:
p.336
Poem Title:
Sent with a Piece of painted flowered Silk to lady Charles Spencer, who had said she was low in Pocket, and could not afford to buy it herself
Attribution:
By the Right Honourable Lady Temple.
Attributed To:
Anna Chamber
First Line:
The subject of my song is health
Page No:
p.345
Poem Title:
On Health.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Immortal Newton never spoke
Page No:
p.352
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
the earl of Chesterfield
Attributed To:
Philip Dormer Stanhope
First Line:
Come come my good shepherds our flocks we must shear
Page No:
p.353
Poem Title:
The new Sheep Shearing Song.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Close thine eyes and sleep secure
Page No:
p.360
Poem Title:
On a quiet Conscience.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What is that vice which still prevails
Page No:
p.360
Poem Title:
On Slander.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sense mere dull formal sense in this gay town
Page No:
pp.365-368
Poem Title:
Extracts from Gotham. Book II.
Attribution:
By C. Churchill
Attributed To:
Charles Churchill
First Line:
All ye whose hearts to tender pity formed
Page No:
pp.375-376
Poem Title:
An affecting Story of Two Lovers.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed