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The Spouter's Companion [T114672]

DMI number:
1400
Publication Date:
1770
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T114672
EEBO/ECCO link:
n/a
Shelfmark:
Bod Harding A 1435
Full Title:
THE | Spouter's Companion; | OR, | THEATRICAL REMEMBRANCER: | CONTAINING | A Select Collection of the most esteemed | PROLOGUES and EPILOGUES | WHICH HAVE BEEN SPOKEN | By the most celebrated PERFORMERS. | TOGETHER WITH | VARIETY of CURIOUS ORIGINALS, | Written on Purpose for this WORK: | AMONG WHICH ARE | Several PROLOGUES and EPILOGUES, | To be spoken in the Characters of | BLOODS, BUCKS, CHOICE SPIRITS, | FRIBBLES, BRAVOS, &c. | TOGETHER WITH | A NEW PROLOGUE ON EPILOGUES, | AND | An EPILOGUE ON PROLOGUES. | To which is added, | The SPOUTER'S MEDLEY: | Containing select Parts of the most celebrated Comedies and | Tragedies, contrasted in such a Manner as to render their | Assemblage extremely diverting to the Readers, Speakers, | and Hearers. | TOGETHER WITH | The SPOUTING-CLUB in an UPROAR, | OR THE | BATTLE of SOCKS and BUSKINS. | [rule] | [epigraph] | [double rule] | LONDON: Printed for J. COOKE, at [i]Shakespeare's Head, | Paternoster-Row:[/i] And sold by T. LEWIS, [i]Great Russel-Street, | Covent-Garden; and[/i] R. MARINER, in [i]Compton-Street, Soho.[/i] | [PRICE ONE SHILLING.]
Epigraph:
[i]Ye Lovers of Thespis, a Table is spread, | To feast you in Taste at the fam'd[/i] Shakespeare's Head: | [i]Then come and regale on our high season'd Books, | Dish'd out and serv'd up by your Caterer,[/i] Cooke. | [i]Here's Humour and Wit ready dress'd for your Ease, | So chuse as ye fancy, and spout as ye please.[/i]
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Duodecimo
Price:
1 s
Pagination:
[4], [5]-35, 25*-36*, 37-96 pp.
Bibliographic details:
Frontispiece. Despite pagination, text and register are continuous.
Comments:
Date: 1770? suggested by ESTC. Pencil annotation in Bod Harding A 1435 suggests '1778'.
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Contents [2pp.]
Related Miscellanies
Title:
The spouter's companion [N23487]
Publication Date:
1770
ESTC No:
N23487
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The spouter's companion [N23612]
Publication Date:
1772
ESTC No:
N23612
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Related People
Publisher:
John Cooke
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Sold by:
R. Mariner
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Sold by:
T. Lewis
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Since life in miniature in plays we see
Page No:
pp.5-7
Poem Title:
The Playhouse Display'd.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I've fought the champions of the earth all round
Page No:
pp.7-8
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken in the Character of a Bully.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh hartshorn hartshorn hartshorn or I faint
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
Prologue, In the Character of a Fribble.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To pass the time before the curtain draws
Page No:
pp.10-11
Poem Title:
A Prologue, Spoken in the Character of a Choice Spirit.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Says one to me at Marjoram's last night
Page No:
pp.11-12
Poem Title:
A Prologue, Spoken in the Character of a Blood.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Behold me in the usual prologue dress
Page No:
pp.12-13
Poem Title:
Prologue Upon Epilogues. Spoken at a private Benefit. Enter in a Black Coat closely buttoned.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When science flourished in an attic age
Page No:
pp.14-15
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken at the opening of a Spouting Club.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well somebody I see at last is come
Page No:
pp.15-16
Poem Title:
An Epilogue, In the Character of Somebody, with a malicious Design against Nobody.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
From Stratford arrived piping hot gentlefolks
Page No:
pp.16-18
Poem Title:
Scrub's Trip To The Jubilee, Spoken by Mr. Weston.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poets and painters who from nature draw
Page No:
pp.18-19
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Clandestine Marriage.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
That I'm a lying rogue you all agree
Page No:
pp.19-21
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Lying Valet. Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Pressed by the load of life the weary mind
Page No:
pp.21-22
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Good Natured Man.
Attribution:
Written by Dr. Johnson
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
Severe their task who in this critic age
Page No:
pp.22-24
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Author.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
Well if thou art my boy a little mellow
Page No:
pp.24-25
Poem Title:
Prologue To Britannia, a Masque. Spoken by Mr. Garrick, In the Character of a Sailor, fuddled and talking to himself. He enters singing.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Measter measter | Is not my measter here among you pray
Page No:
pp.26-28
Poem Title:
Prologue to Barbarossa.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick, And Spoken by him in the Character of a Country Boy.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Prologues precede the piece in mournful verse
Page No:
pp.28-29
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Apprentice, As Spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With doubt joy apprehension almost dumb
Page No:
pp.29-30
Poem Title:
Prologue Spoken to Much Ado About Nothing, Acted by Command of his Majesty, By Mr. Garrick. Being his first Appearance on the Stage, after his Return from Italy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Some strange caprice forever rules the stage
Page No:
pp.31-32
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Citizen, A Farce...Spoken by Mr. OBrien.
Attribution:
By A. Murphy, Esq;
Attributed To:
Arthur Murphy
First Line:
Oh George George George it is such rakes as you
Page No:
pp.32-34
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Citizen, Spoken by Mr. Shuter and Mr. Woodward, in the Characters of Old Philpot, and Young Philpot.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Success makes people vain the maxim's true
Page No:
pp.34-35
Poem Title:
Prologue To The School For Lovers, Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An epilogue methinks I heard you cry
Page No:
pp.28*-29*
Poem Title:
An Epilogue Upon Prologues.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An old trite proverb let me quote
Page No:
pp.30*-31*
Poem Title:
Prologue Upon Prologues....Spoken By Mr. King.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Before the breast factitious feelings knew
Page No:
p.32*
Poem Title:
Prologue Spoken by Mr. T. Smith, at a private Benefit.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
From London your honours to Stratford I'm come
Page No:
pp.34*-35*
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Jubilee. Spoken in the Character of a Waiter.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let me see have I the prologue ay or no
Page No:
pp.33*-34*
Poem Title:
A Prologue On Prologues, Intended to have been spoken on a particular Occasion.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Prologues like cards of compliments we find
Page No:
pp.26*-27*
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Lame Lover.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken by Mr. Gentleman.
Attributed To:
Francis Gentleman
First Line:
Since Garrick's first appearance on the stage
Page No:
pp.25*-26*
Poem Title:
An Occasional Prologue Spoken at a Spouting-Club.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The many various objects that amuse
Page No:
pp.36-25*
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Various the shifts of authors nowadays
Page No:
pp.29*-30*
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Comedy of the Brothers, Spoken by Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Your servants kind masters from bottom to top
Page No:
pp.35*-37
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dr. Last in his Chariot.
Attribution:
Written by David Garrick, Esq; and spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ye social friends of claret and of wit
Page No:
pp.37-39
Poem Title:
The Picture of a Playhouse; Or, Bucks Have At Ye All.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When bards first strolled through famous Greece
Page No:
pp.39-41
Poem Title:
The Feast: Or, Thespis's Advice to his Brother Poets and Actors.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Critics hark forward noble game and new
Page No:
pp.41-42
Poem Title:
Prologue To The West Indian. Spoken by Mr. Reddish.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When Thespis first of players with happy art
Page No:
pp.43-44
Poem Title:
An Occasional Prologue, Spoken by the Author, On the Society of Gentlemen, called Thespians, removing from the Place of their late Meeting.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh there ye are before one word I utter
Page No:
pp.44-45
Poem Title:
Prologue To 'Tis Well It's No Worse.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Instead of an epilogue round smart and terse
Page No:
p.46
Poem Title:
An Address to the Town, by way of Epilogue to 'Tis Well It's No Worse. Spoken By Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What whims what fancies are in these our days
Page No:
pp.47-48
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken By Mr. S--r, at the opening of the Spouting Club at Chatham.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Once more we're come in spite of party rage
Page No:
p.48
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken at a Spouting Club, on Account of an Information having been made to the Justices of the Peace in order to suppress it.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Kind sirs you're welcome to our humble fare
Page No:
p.49
Poem Title:
Epilogue...spoke by Mr. R--y, at a young Spouting-Club.
Attribution:
Wrote by Mr. S---r.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since masquing's in fashion with every degree
Page No:
pp.50-51
Poem Title:
A New Song, Sung by the Author, in the Character of a Ballad-Singer, In the Masquerade which was introduced by the Thespians, among the other Performances, on Saturday, December 24, 1768.
Attribution:
The Author
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When learning's triumph over her barbarous foes
Page No:
pp.51-53
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken by Mr. Garrick, At the Opening of the Theatre in Drury-Lane, 1747.
Attribution:
Written by Samuel Johnson.
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
I am a devil so please you and must hoof
Page No:
pp.53-54
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Fashionable Lover; Spoken by Mr. Weston, in the Character of a Printer's Devil.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies your country's ornament and pride
Page No:
pp.55-56
Poem Title:
Epilogue. Spoken by Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A tragic tale from Norman William's age
Page No:
pp.56-57
Poem Title:
Prologue to Matilda. Spoken by Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ha ha poor creature how you trembling stand
Page No:
pp.57-59
Poem Title:
Epilogue. Spoken by Miss Younge.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Excuse me sirs I pray I can't yet speak
Page No:
pp.59-60
Poem Title:
Prologue to She Stoops to Conquer, Or The Mistakes Of A Night...Spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attribution:
Wrote by David Garrick, Esq;
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Well having stooped to conquer with success
Page No:
pp.60-61
Poem Title:
Epilogue...Spoken by Mrs. Bulkeley.
Attribution:
Wrote by Dr. Goldsmith.
Attributed To:
Oliver Goldsmith
First Line:
As I'm an artist can my skill do better
Page No:
pp.62-63
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Choleric Man...Spoken by Mrs Abington.
Attribution:
By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
A female doctor sirs and pray why not
Page No:
pp.64-65
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Spleen. Spoken by Mrs. King, In the Character of Dr. Anodyne.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Confiding in the justice of the place
Page No:
pp.65-66
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Maid Of Bath...Spoken by Mrs. Jewel.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
Critics whenever I write in every scene
Page No:
pp.66-67
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Capuchin...Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Critics I come your favour to implore
Page No:
p.69
Poem Title:
Prologue To Semiramis...Spoken by Mr. Reddish.
Attribution:
Written by G. E. Ayscough, Esq;
Attributed To:
George Edward Ayscough
First Line:
Disheveled still like Asia's bleeding queen
Page No:
pp.70-71
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Semiramis...Spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Written by R. B. Sheridan, Esq;
Attributed To:
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
First Line:
Deaf to the bar the pulpit and the throne
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Duellist...Spoken by Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Written by the Author.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Go on prepare my bounty for my friends
Page No:
pp.73-74
Poem Title:
Prologue To A Christmas Tale.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hip music music have you more to play
Page No:
pp.74-76
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Grecian Daughter. Spoken by Mr. Weston.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poor I tossed up and down from shore to shore
Page No:
pp.76-77
Poem Title:
Mr. Macklin's Farewell Epilogue.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Somebody says but I forgot his name
Page No:
pp.78-79
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Romance Of An hour...Spoken by Mrs. Bulkley.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Kelly.
Attributed To:
Hugh Kelly
First Line:
Too long the muse attached to regal show
Page No:
pp.80-81
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Thomas Overbury...Spoken by Mr. Hull.
Attribution:
Written by R. B. Sheridan, Esq;
Attributed To:
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
First Line:
To hear with candour ere we judge a cause
Page No:
pp.81-83
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Hotel: Or, The Double Valet. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Critics be dumb tonight a lady sues
Page No:
pp.83-84
Poem Title:
Prologue To Almida...Spoken by Mr. Reddish.
Attribution:
Written by William Whitehead, Esq;
Attributed To:
William Whitehead
First Line:
Behold ye critics of this classic age
Page No:
pp.84-85
Poem Title:
Prologue To An Hour Before Marriage. Spoken by Mr. Woodward, in the Character of Harlequin.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Tis I can twist and twine the clearest case
Page No:
pp.86-87
Poem Title:
The Bull and Boat. A Comic Interlude.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Plato it must be so thou reasonest well
Page No:
pp.88-92
Poem Title:
Spouter's Medley.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Pray who's that fellow dressed so plaguey mean
Page No:
pp.93-96
Poem Title:
The Spouting Club In An Uproar; Or, The Squabble of Socks and Buskins.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed