Blacklight

The theatrical bouquet: containing prologues and epilogues from Colley Cibber to the present year. [T193665] [ECCO]

DMI number:
1344
Publication Date:
1778
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T193665
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW117236024
Full Title:
THE | THEATRICAL BOUQUET: | CONTAINING AN | ALPHABETICAL ARRANGEMENT | OF THE | PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES, | Which have been Published by | DISTINGUISHED WITS, | FROM | The Time that COLLEY CIBBER first came on the | STAGE, to the present Year. | [Rule] | [Epigraph] | [Rule] | [Ornament] | [Double Rule] | LONDON: | Printed for T. LOWNDES, No. 77, in Fleet-Street. | [Short rule] | M DCC LXXVIII.
Epigraph:
Epigraph: Extrema cum primis; | Lilia Amarynthis.
Format:
Duodecimo
Other matter:
Address "To David Garrick, Esq.", pp.3-4
Related People
Publisher:
T. Lowndes
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
As when some ancient hospitable seat
Page No:
pp.1-2
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Intriguing Chamber - Maid. Spoken By Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An old trite proverb let me quote
Page No:
pp.2-3
Poem Title:
Prologue upon Prologues. By Mr. Garrick, Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
All all shall out all that I know and feel
Page No:
pp.3-5
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Desert Island ... In the Character of a Drunken Poet.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
A skilful cook this useful art will boast
Page No:
pp.5-6
Poem Title:
Prologue to Daphne and Amyntor.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A grecian bard two thousand years ago
Page No:
pp.6-7
Poem Title:
Prologue To Hecuba ... Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Lloyd.
Attributed To:
Robert Lloyd
First Line:
As it is proved by scholars of great fame
Page No:
pp.7-8
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Sethona [...] Spoken by Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
As I'm an artist can my skill do better
Page No:
pp.9-10
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Choleric Man [...] Spoken by Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
A tragic tale from Norman William's age
Page No:
pp.10-11
Poem Title:
Prologue to Matilda.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A female doctor sirs and pray why not
Page No:
pp.11-12
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Spleen. Spoken by Mrs. King, In the Character of Dr. Anodyne.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A female bard far from her native land
Page No:
pp.12-14
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Almida... Spoken by Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
And what becomes of your poor servant Shift
Page No:
pp.14-15
Poem Title:
The Concluding Speech To The Minor. Shift, addressing himself to Sir George Wealthy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An epilogue methinks I heard you cry
Page No:
pp.15-16
Poem Title:
An Epilogue upon Prologues.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A very pretty bill as I'm alive
Page No:
pp.16-17
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Apprentice. Spoken by Mrs. Clive. Enters reading the Play-Bill.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
At length I'm freed from tragical parade
Page No:
pp.17-18
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Creusa. Spoken by Miss Haughton.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Among the arts to make a piece go down
Page No:
pp.18-19
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Englishman Returned From Paris. Spoken by Mrs. Bellamy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A female culprit at your bar appears
Page No:
pp.19-20
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Discovery.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An epilogue I asked but not one word
Page No:
p.21
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Douglas. Spoken by Mr. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An epilogue through custom is your right
Page No:
pp.21-22
Poem Title:
An Historical Epilogue to the Brothers.
Attribution:
By the Author.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Against such odds if Edward could succeed
Page No:
pp.22-23
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Edward the Black Prince. Spoken by Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As the success of authors is uncertain
Page No:
pp.23-24
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Gil Blas [...] Spoken by Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Are you all ready here's your music here
Page No:
pp.24-25
Poem Title:
Prologue to the same. Spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A moment stop your tuneful fingers pray
Page No:
pp.25-27
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Fairies.
Attribution:
Written and spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
As heroes states and kingdoms rise and fall
Page No:
pp.27-28
Poem Title:
Occasional Prologue: At the Opening of Drury-Lane Theatre. Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A mischief on it though I'm again alive
Page No:
pp.28-29
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Caius Marius. Spoken by Mrs. Barry, who acted Lavinia.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Britons this night presents a state distressed
Page No:
pp.29-30
Poem Title:
Prologue to Gustavus Vasa.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Bold is the man who in this nicer age
Page No:
p.30
Poem Title:
Prologue to Tancred and Sigismunda.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Before this court I Peter Puff appear
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
Prologue to Taste. [...] And spoken by him in the Character of an Auctioneer.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Bold was the man and fenced in every part
Page No:
pp.33-34
Poem Title:
Prologue To No One's Enemy But His Own.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Behold a conjuror that's something new
Page No:
pp.34-35
Poem Title:
Prologue to Lilliput. [...] Spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attribution:
By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Behold ye critics of this classic age
Page No:
pp.35-36
Poem Title:
Prologue to An Hour Before Marriage. Spoken by Mr. Woodward in the Character of Harlequin.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Beside his native Thames our poet long
Page No:
pp.36-37
Poem Title:
Prologue to Boadicia. Spoken by Mr. Mossop.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Britons tonight in native pomp we come
Page No:
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Roman Father. Spoken by Mr. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Behold the prodigal returned quite tame
Page No:
p.39
Poem Title:
Prologue [...] on his first Appearance on Covent Garden Theatrs, October 5, in the Character of Marplot, after having been Manager at Dublin four Years.
Attribution:
written and spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attributed To:
Henry Woodward
First Line:
Curse on all cowards say I why bless my eyes
Page No:
pp.40-41
Poem Title:
An Epilogue, Designed to be spoken by Mrs. Woffington, in the Character of a Volunteer, in the Year 1746.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Confiding in the justice of the place
Page No:
pp.41-42
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Maid of Bath. [...] Spoken by Mrs. Jewell.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
Critics whenever I write in every scene
Page No:
pp.42-44
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Capuchin [...] Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Can it be thought ye wives this scribbling fool
Page No:
pp.44-45
Poem Title:
Epilogue to School for Wives. Spoken by Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Critics hark forward noble game and new
Page No:
pp.45-46
Poem Title:
Prologue to the West Indian. Spoken by Mr. Reddish.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Critics be dumb tonight a lady sues
Page No:
pp.46-47
Poem Title:
Prologue to Almida...Spoken by Mr. Reddish.
Attribution:
Written by William Whitehead, Esq.
Attributed To:
William Whitehead
First Line:
Could those who never tried conceive the sweat
Page No:
pp.47-48
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Double Gallant.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Critics your favour is our author's right
Page No:
pp.48-49
Poem Title:
Prologue, At the Revival of Every Man in his Humour. Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Conquest and freedom are at length our own
Page No:
pp.49-50
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Careless Husband.
Attribution:
Written by Colley Cibber, Esq.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Critics I come your favour to implore
Page No:
p.51
Poem Title:
Prologue to Semiramis [...] Spoken by Mr. Reddish.
Attribution:
Written by G. E. Ayscough, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Edward Ayscough
First Line:
Deaf to the bar the pulpit and the throne
Page No:
pp.52-53
Poem Title:
Prollgue to the Duellist. [...] Spoken by Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Writtne by the Author.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Disheveled still like Asia's bleeding queen
Page No:
pp.53-54
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Semiramis [...] Spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Written by R. B. Sheridan, Esq.
Attributed To:
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
First Line:
Exhausted quite with prisons racks and death
Page No:
pp.55-56
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Earl of Warwick [...] Spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Written by David Garrick, Esq.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Escaped from my guardian's tyrannical sway
Page No:
p.57
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Englishman in Paris. Spoken by Miss Macklin.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Enough of Greece and Rome the exhausted store
Page No:
p.58
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Orphan Of China.
Attribution:
Written by William Whitehead, Esq.
Attributed To:
William Whitehead
First Line:
From Otway's and immortal Shakespeare's page
Page No:
pp.60-61
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Clementina...Spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. George Colman, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
For wit's keen satire and this laughing stage
Page No:
pp.61-62
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Bankrupt.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
Fresh from the schools behold an Oxford smart
Page No:
pp.62-63
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Oxonian In Town. Spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
From Stratford arrived piping hot gentlefolks
Page No:
pp.63-65
Poem Title:
Scrub's Stratford Jubilee.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
From London your honours to Stratford I'm come
Page No:
pp.65-66
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Jubilee. Spoken in the Character of a Waiter.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Fashion in every thing bears sovereign sway
Page No:
pp.66-67
Poem Title:
Prologue to Bon Ton [...] Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Fond of your praise the praise which most I love
Page No:
pp.68-69
Poem Title:
An Occasional Prologue to Miss in her Teens. [...] Spoken by Master and Miss Simson.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Havard.
Attributed To:
William Havard [Harvard or Haverd]
First Line:
From Fletcher's great original today
Page No:
pp.69-70
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Inconstant [...] Spoken by Mr. Wilks.
Attribution:
Written by Nathaniel Rowe, Esq.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Rowe
First Line:
Good folks I'm come at my young lady's bidding
Page No:
pp.70-71
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Miss in her Teens. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Go on prepare my bounty for my friends
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
Prologue to A Christmas Tale.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Gallants behold before your eyes the wight
Page No:
pp.72-73
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Refusal. [...] Spoken by the Author.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Hip music music have you more to play
Page No:
pp.74-75
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Grecian Daughter. Spoken By Mr. Weston.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hold sir | Our plot concluded and strict justice done
Page No:
pp.75-76
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Lyar. Between Miss Grantham and Old Wilding.
Attribution:
Written by a Man of Fashion.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hard is the task to trace the poet's life
Page No:
pp.76-77
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Word to the Wise. [...] Spoken by Mrs. Bulkeley.
Attribution:
Written by a Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ha ha poor creature how you trembling stand
Page No:
pp.77-78
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Matilda. [...] Spoken by Miss Younge.
Attribution:
By the Author of the Tragedy.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Here they are ladies should these charming packs
Page No:
pp.79-80
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Oxonian in Town. Spoken By Mrs. Mattocks.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How sweet are the banks upon Tweed
Page No:
pp.80-81
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Butiad. Spoken by a Scotchman.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hither in days of yore from Spain or France
Page No:
pp.81-82
Poem Title:
Prologue To Polly Honeycombe. Spoken By Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Happy my muse had she first turned her art
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Knights.
Attribution:
Written And Spoken By Mr. Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
Hush such a scene enough to make one split
Page No:
pp.83-84
Poem Title:
Prologue [...] and Spoken by Mrs. [sic] Hamilton, on his first Appearance, as a Player, in the Character of Othello, at Covent-Garden.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Murphy,
Attributed To:
Arthur Murphy
First Line:
How do you all good folks in tears for certain
Page No:
pp.84-86
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Zenobia. [...] Spoken by Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Written by David Garrick, Esq.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Here take a surfeit sirs of being jealous
Page No:
pp.86-87
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Zara. Spoken by Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I'm sent good folks to speak the epilogue
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Zingis. [...] Spoken by Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
I'll hear no more thou wretch attend to reason
Page No:
pp.88-90
Poem Title:
Prologue to the English Merchant.
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
I speak a prologue what strange whim I wonder
Page No:
pp.91-92
Poem Title:
Prologue to Perplexities.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I who was late so volatile and gay
Page No:
pp.93-94
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the School For Scandal. [...] And spoken by Mrs. Abington, in the Character of Lady Teazel.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
In parliament whenever a question comes
Page No:
pp.94-95
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Maid of the Oaks. [...] Spoken by Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
In classic times as learned authors say
Page No:
pp.95-96
Poem Title:
Prologue to Sethona. [...] Spoken by Mr. Reddish.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
I'm vexed quite vexed and you'll be vexed that's worse
Page No:
pp.97-98
Poem Title:
Prologue To False Delicacy...Spoken By Mr. King
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Instead of an epilogue round smart and terse
Page No:
p.97
Poem Title:
An Address to the Town, by way of Epilogue to 'Tis Well It's No Worse. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Is not my master here among you pray
Page No:
pp.99-100
Poem Title:
Prologue to Barbarossa.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick, and spoken by him in the Character of a Country Boy.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
In these our moral and religious days
Page No:
pp.100-101
Poem Title:
Prologue to Clementina...Spoken by Mr. Bensley.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Is the stage clear bless me I've such a dread
Page No:
pp.102-103
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Cymon...Spoken By Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Written By George Keate, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Keate
First Line:
I come obedient at my brethren's call
Page No:
pp.103-104
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Same. For New Year's Day. Spoken By Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I'm right your servant sirs the address is plain
Page No:
pp.104-106
Poem Title:
The Occasional Prologue, Spoken by Mr. King, At the Opening of Drury-Lane Theatre
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I am a devil so please you and must hoof
Page No:
pp.106-107
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Fashionable Lover. Spoken by Mr. Weston, in the Character of a Printer's Devil.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In those bad times when learning's sons explore
Page No:
pp.107-108
Poem Title:
Prologue To Zobedie.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I know you all expect from seeing me
Page No:
pp.108-109
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Foundling...Spoken by Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
In these distracted times when each man dreads
Page No:
pp.109-110
Poem Title:
Prologue To Venice Preserv'd: Or, a Plot Discover'd.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In ages past when will those times renew
Page No:
pp.110-112
Poem Title:
Prologue to Caius Marius. Spoken by Mr. Betterton.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In arms renowned for arts of peace adored
Page No:
p.112
Poem Title:
Prologue To Alfred...Spoken By Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Written by John, Earl of Corke.
Attributed To:
John Boyle
First Line:
In this grave age when comedies are few
Page No:
pp.113-114
Poem Title:
Prologue to Drummer, Or, the Haunted-House.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In ancient times when Britain's trade was arms
Page No:
p.114
Poem Title:
Prologue to Douglas...Spoken by Mr. Sparks.
Attribution:
Written by Nicholas Rowe, Esq.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
If any here are Britons but in name
Page No:
pp.115-116
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Earl of Essex...Spoken by Mrs. Pritchard, in the Character of Queen Elizabeth.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
If to our play your judgment can't be kind
Page No:
p.115
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Beaux Stratagem.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I had an epilogue to speak tonight
Page No:
pp.117-118
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Double Mistake. Spoken by Miss Wilford, in the Character of Lady Louisa.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I'm glad with all my heart I've scaped my wedding
Page No:
pp.118-119
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Merope. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In Athens once as classic story runs
Page No:
pp.120-121
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Choleric Man...Spoken by Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
Ladies by me our courteous author sends
Page No:
pp.121-122
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Roman Father. Spoken by Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies I've had a squabble with the poet
Page No:
pp.122-123
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Jealous Wife...Spoken by Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Lloyd.
Attributed To:
Robert Lloyd
First Line:
Ladies and gentlemen tis so ill bred
Page No:
pp.123-125
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Elvira...Spoken by Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ladies and gentlemen they've sent me out
Page No:
pp.125-126
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Doctor Last in his Chariot. Spoken by a Little Girl of Five Years old.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Like famed La Mancha's knight who lance in hand
Page No:
pp.126-127
Poem Title:
Prologue To Moore's Gamester.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ladies with leave | pass | pass | you must do more
Page No:
pp.127-131
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Clandestine Marriage.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ladies methinks I hear you all complain
Page No:
pp.131-132
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Dupe...Spoken By Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Written By A Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies your country's ornament and pride
Page No:
pp.133-134
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Fashionable Lover. Spoken by Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies I'm come if not engaged elsewhere
Page No:
pp.134-135
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Careless Husband. Acted privately by a Person of Quality.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My poor papa's in woeful agitation
Page No:
pp.135-136
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Polly Honeycombe...Spoken By Miss Pope.
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
My conduct now will every mind employ
Page No:
pp.136-137
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Gamesters...And Spoken By Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Written By A Friend,
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My jewels I'm come to spake in the behalf
Page No:
pp.137-138
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Countess of Salisbury, Spoken by Mr. Weston, in the Character of a Teague.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Mr Weston Mr Weston
Page No:
pp.138-140
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Trip to Portsmouth.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Methinks tonight I cast my eyes around
Page No:
pp.140-141
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken at the Theatre-Royal, in Covent-Garden, on Occasion of a Monument to be erected by Contribution to Shakespear...Spoken by Mr. Ryan.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Theobald.
Attributed To:
Lewis Theobald
First Line:
Marry a Turk a haughty tyrant king
Page No:
pp.141-142
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Irene.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Methinks I hear some powdered critics say
Page No:
pp.142-143
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Provok'd Husband, Or, A Journey to London; Spoken by Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Mongst all the rules the ancients had in vogue
Page No:
pp.143-144
Poem Title:
Epilogue to She Wou'd and She Wou'd Not,
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now we have shown the fatal fruits of strife
Page No:
pp.144-145
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Boadicea, Spoken by Mr. Harvard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Near the mad mansions of Moorfields I'll bawl
Page No:
pp.145-146
Poem Title:
Mr. Foot in the Character of Dr. Squintum.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
News news good folks rare news and you shall know it
Page No:
pp.146-147
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Jones's Earl of Essex. Spoken by Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
No coward he who in this critic age
Page No:
pp.147-149
Poem Title:
Prologue to the School for Wives. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now gallants for the author first to you
Page No:
pp.149-150
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Love's Last Shift: Or, the Lady in Fashion. Spoken by Miss Cross in the Character of Cupid.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Nay but I must I must indeed papa
Page No:
pp.150-151
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane, April 30, 1765, by Miss. Hopkins, a Child of six Years old, at the Benefit of Mr. Hopkins, Prompter, and Mrs. Hopkins.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our author's sore bewitched the senseless rogue
Page No:
pp.151-152
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Miser...Spoken by Mrs. Raftor.
Attribution:
Written by Colly Cibber, Esq.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Oh George George George it is such rakes as you
Page No:
pp.152-153
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Citizen. Spoken by Mr. Shuter and Mr. Woodward, in the Characters of Old Philpot and Young Philpot.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Once more from Ludgate hill behold Paul Prig
Page No:
pp.153-154
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Spanish Barber...Spoken by Mr. Parsons.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Old times old fashions and the fairies gone
Page No:
pp.155-156
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Edgar and Emmeline...Spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
On every gamester in the Arabian nation
Page No:
pp.156-157
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Moore's Gamester. Spoken by Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our authors as I'm told is not to seek
Page No:
pp.157-158
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Siege of Aquileia. Spoken by Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh such a sight I've been upon the course
Page No:
pp.158-159
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Note of Hand: or, the Trip to Newmarket.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh there ye are before one word I utter
Page No:
pp.159-160
Poem Title:
Prologue To 'Tis Well It's No Worse.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our play thus over now swells each throbbing breast
Page No:
pp.160-161
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Alzuma. Spoken by Mrs. Heartley.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of old when Greece in a declining age
Page No:
pp.161-162
Poem Title:
Prologue To Zenobia. Spoken By Mr. Holland.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all men those have reason least to care
Page No:
pp.162-163
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Chances.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all the various vices of the age
Page No:
pp.163-164
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Careless Husband.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our desperate bard our bold excursion tries
Page No:
p.164
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Earl of Essex. Spoken by Mr. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all the passion that possess mankind
Page No:
p.165
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Englishman Return'd to Paris. Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Pride by a thousand arts vain honours claims
Page No:
pp.166-167
Poem Title:
Prologue, On the Opening of the Theatre-Royal in the Haymarket, May 15, 1777...Spoken by Mr. Palmer.
Attribution:
Written by George Colman, Esq.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Pray let me see if what France says be true
Page No:
pp.167-168
Poem Title:
Prologue to All the World's a Stage. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Post haste from Italy arrives my lover
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Runaway...Spoken by Miss Younge.
Attribution:
Written by David Garrick, Esq.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Pressed by the load of life the weary mind
Page No:
p.170
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Good Natured Man.
Attribution:
Written by Dr. Johnson.
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
Poets and painters who from nature draw
Page No:
p.170
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Clandestine Marriage.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Prologues precede the piece in mournful verse
Page No:
pp.172-173
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Apprentice. Spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Pshaw damn your epilogue and hold your tongue
Page No:
pp.173-174
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Barbarossa...Spoken by Mr. Woodward, In the Character of a fine Gentleman.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Prologues of old the learned in language say
Page No:
pp.174-175
Poem Title:
Prologue to Creusa, Spoken by Mr. Ross.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Prologues like compliments are loss of time
Page No:
pp.175-176
Poem Title:
Prologue to Virginia,
Attribution:
Written and Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Perhaps you gentlemen expect today
Page No:
p.177
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Chances.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poor I tossed up and down from shore to shore
Page No:
pp.178-179
Poem Title:
Mr. Macklin's Farewell Epilogue.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Somebody says but I forgot his name
Page No:
pp.179-180
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Romance of an Hour...Spoken by Mrs. Bulkley.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Kelly.
Attributed To:
Hugh Kelly
First Line:
See here good folks how genius is abused
Page No:
pp.181-182
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Man of Business. Spoken by Mr. Woodward.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since your old taste for laughing is come back
Page No:
pp.182-183
Poem Title:
Prologue to Albumazar. Spoken by Mr. King. At the Revival in 1773.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since my good friends though late are pleased at last
Page No:
pp.183-184
Poem Title:
Mr. Garrick's Address to the Town, In the Character of the Busy Body.
Attribution:
Mr. Garrick's
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Stripped of my tragic weeds and raised from death
Page No:
pp.184-185
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Hecuba...Spoken by Miss. Bride.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Severe their task who in this critic age
Page No:
pp.185-187
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Author.
Attribution:
Written and spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
Some strange caprice forever rules the stage
Page No:
pp.188-189
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Citizen...And spoken by Mr. Obrien.
Attribution:
Written by A. Murphy, Esq.
Attributed To:
Arthur Murphy
First Line:
Success makes people vain the maxim's true
Page No:
pp.187-188
Poem Title:
Prologue To The School For Lovers. Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Severe each poet's lot but sure most hard
Page No:
pp.189-190
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Earl of Warwick.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Since plays are but a kind of public feasts
Page No:
pp.190-191
Poem Title:
Prologue to Love makes a Man: or, the Fop's Fortune.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since plays are but the mirrors of our lives
Page No:
pp.191-192
Poem Title:
Prologue, to the Lady's Last Stake: Or, the Wife's Resentment.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though lately dead a princess and of Spain
Page No:
pp.193-194
Poem Title:
Epilogue, to Alonzo, Spoken by Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The law of custom is the law of fools
Page No:
pp.194-195
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Sister ... Spoken by Mrs. Mattocks.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
The bard whose hopes on comedy depend
Page No:
pp.195-196
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Register Office. Spoken By Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The grecian daughter's compliments to all
Page No:
pp.196-198
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Grecian Daughter...Spoken By Miss Younge.
Attribution:
Written by a Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Too long has farce neglecting nature's laws
Page No:
p.198
Poem Title:
Prologue to Miss in her Teens,
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis strange excuse my gravity tis passing strange
Page No:
pp.199-200
Poem Title:
Mr. Woodward's Prologue to Every Man in his Humour, (Perform'd March 15, 1763, for his Benefit at Covent-Garden.
Attribution:
Mr. Woodward.
Attributed To:
Henry Woodward
First Line:
To warn the sons of freedom to be wise
Page No:
pp.200-201
Poem Title:
Prologue to Athelstan. Spoken by Mr. Holland, in the Character of the Genius of Britain.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Too much the Greek and Roman chiefs engage
Page No:
pp.201-202
Poem Title:
Prologue to Zingis. Spoken by Mr. Holland.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The world's a stage great Shakespeare says
Page No:
pp.202-203
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Butiad. Spoken By Any Body.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
That I'm a lying rogue you all agree
Page No:
pp.103[i.e. 203]-204
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Lying Valet. Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tonight be it known to box galleries and pit
Page No:
p.205
Poem Title:
Prologue To All In The Wrong.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
Tonight good folks though led a little dance
Page No:
pp.206-207
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Romance of an Hour... Spoken by Mr. Lee.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Kelly,
Attributed To:
John Kelly
First Line:
Though the young smarts I see begin to sneer
Page No:
pp.207-208
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Suspicious Husband,
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
This night we add some heroes to our store
Page No:
pp.209-210
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Taylors. Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The poet's pen can like a conjurer's wand
Page No:
pp.210-211
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Virginia...Spoken by Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick,
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
This night presents a play which public rage
Page No:
pp.211-212
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Word to the Wise. For the Benefit of Mrs. Kelly and her Children...And spoken by Mr. Hull.
Attribution:
Written for the Occasion by Dr. Johnson.
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
Too long the muse attached to regal show
Page No:
pp.212-213
Poem Title:
Prologue to Sir Thomas Overbury... Spoken by Mr. Hull.
Attribution:
Written by R. B. Sheridan, Esq.
Attributed To:
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
First Line:
Through the wide tracts of life in every trade
Page No:
pp.213-214
Poem Title:
Prologue to Know Your Own Mind...Spoken by Mr. Lewis.
Attribution:
Written by Arthur Murphy, Esq.
Attributed To:
Arthur Murphy
First Line:
To various things the stage has been compared
Page No:
pp.214-216
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Winter's Tale, (Altered from Shakespeare,)...And spoken by Mr. Jefferson, at the Theatre Royal, Richmond.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
The French however Mercurial they may seem
Page No:
pp.216-217
Poem Title:
Prologue to Zara...Spoken by Mr. Cibber.
Attribution:
Written by C. Cibber, Esq.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
To contradict me blockhead idiot fool sot
Page No:
pp.217-218
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Englishman in Paris. Between Mr. Macklin and his Wife.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To wake the soul by tender strokes of art
Page No:
pp.219-220
Poem Title:
Prologue To Cato...Spoken by Mr. Wilks.
Attribution:
By Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Though prologues now as blackberries are plenty
Page No:
pp.220-221
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Spleen, or Islington Spa...Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
To speak ten words again I've fetched my breath
Page No:
pp.221-223
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Athalstan...Spoken by Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
To hear with candour ere we judge a cause
Page No:
pp.223-224
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Hotel: Or, the Double Valet. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The fifth act past you'll think it strange to find
Page No:
pp.224-225
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Alzira. Spoken by Mrs. Giffard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The text is done and now for application
Page No:
pp.225-226
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Venice Preserv'd.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The play is at an end but where's the plot
Page No:
p.227
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Rehearsal.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The time is come the Roman bard foretold
Page No:
pp.227-228
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Refusal: Or, the Ladies Philosophy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Through five long acts I've wore my sighing face
Page No:
pp.229-230
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Orphan of China. Spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis not a birth to titles pomp or state
Page No:
pp.230-231
Poem Title:
An Epilogue On the Birth-Day of his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland.
Attribution:
Written by a person stiling himself the Farmer. Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To speak with freedom dignity and ease
Page No:
pp.231-232
Poem Title:
Prologue to Cato. Spoken by Prince George, When his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales's Children perform'd the above Tragedy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The prologue's filled with such fine phrases
Page No:
pp.232-233
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Cato. Spoken by Lady Augusta, and Prince Edward.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Touched be your generous hearts to spare this play
Page No:
pp.234-235
Poem Title:
Prologue to Merope. Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The many various objects that amuse
Page No:
pp.235-236
Poem Title:
An Occasional Prologue...And spoken by Mr. Foote, at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
This night let busy man no pleasure spare
Page No:
pp.236-237
Poem Title:
Prologue to Amphitryon, Reviv'd with alterations, 1756.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Twas once the mode inglorious war to wage
Page No:
pp.237-238
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Cleone...Spoken by Mr. Ross.
Attribution:
Written by Wm. Melmoth, Esq.
Attributed To:
William Melmoth
First Line:
To damn or not that is the question now
Page No:
pp.238-239
Poem Title:
Prologue to Eugenia.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
The tragic muse revolving many a page
Page No:
p.240
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Brothers...Spoken by Mr. Harvard.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dodsley.
Attributed To:
Robert Dodsley
First Line:
The sons of genius search through every age
Page No:
pp.241-242
Poem Title:
Prologue to Edward, the Black Prince. Spoken by Mr. Harvard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The great the good the wise in every age
Page No:
pp.242-243
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Honest Yorkshireman.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The deuce is in him what the deuce
Page No:
pp.243-244
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Deuce Is In Him. Spoken By Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The paths of truth with fancy's flowers to strow
Page No:
pp.244-245
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Dupe.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
This night your tributary tears we claim
Page No:
pp.245-246
Poem Title:
Prologue to Oroonoko.
Attribution:
Alter'd by Dr. Hawksworth.
Attributed To:
John Hawkesworth
First Line:
This play took birth from principles of truth
Page No:
pp.246-247
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Provok'd Husband: Or, a Journey to London. Spoken by Mr. Wilks.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To you great judges in this writing age
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Orphan.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To win your hearts and to secure your praise
Page No:
p.248
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Conscious Lovers...Spoken by Mr. Wilks.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Welstead.
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
To gain the public ear our man of rhymes
Page No:
pp.249-250
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Widow'd Wife. Spoken by Mr. Holland.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The jealous wife a comedy poor man
Page No:
pp.250-251
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Jealous Wife...Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Lloyd.
Attributed To:
Robert Lloyd
First Line:
Unlike to ancient fame all eyes tongues ears
Page No:
pp.251-252
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Maid of the Oaks. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Various the shifts of authors nowadays
Page No:
pp.252-253
Poem Title:
Prologue To the Comedy of the Brothers. Spoken by Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ventre bleu vere is dis dam poet vere
Page No:
pp.253-254
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Sir Harry Wildair, Being the Sequel of the Trip to the Jubilee.
Attribution:
By a Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When some raw paddler from the waded shore
Page No:
pp.254-255
Poem Title:
Prologue to Alzira. Spoken by Mr. Giffard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While other culprits brave it to the last
Page No:
pp.255-256
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Suspicious Husband.
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Well now all's ended and my comrades gone
Page No:
pp.256-257
Poem Title:
Epilogue. To be Spoken in the Character of Tony Lumpkin.
Attribution:
Written By J. Craddock, Esq.
Attributed To:
J. Craddock
First Line:
When first Columbus left the spanish shore
Page No:
pp.257-258
Poem Title:
Prologue to Alzuma. Spoken by Mr. Bensley.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whilst ardent zeal for India's reformation
Page No:
pp.258-259
Poem Title:
Prologue to Alonzo. Spoken by Mr. Palmer.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Wherever commerce spreads the swelling sail
Page No:
pp.259-260
Poem Title:
Prologue. On the Opening of the new Theatre-Royal in Liverpool, on Friday the 5th of June, 1772. ...Spoken by Mr. Younger.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Well fare the man peace to his gentle shade
Page No:
pp.260-261
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Zobedie.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What odd fantastic things we women do
Page No:
pp.261-262
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Cato...Spoken By Mr. Porter.
Attribution:
By Dr. Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
What five long acts and all to make us wiser
Page No:
pp.262-263
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Sister...Spoken by Mrs. Bukley.
Attribution:
Written by Dr. Goldsmith.
Attributed To:
Oliver Goldsmith
First Line:
Whenever the wits of France take pen in hand
Page No:
pp.264-265
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Gamesters.
Attribution:
Written And Spoken By Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Well if thou art my boy a little mellow
Page No:
pp.265-266
Poem Title:
Prologue To Britannia, a Masque. Spoken by Mr. Garrick. In the Character of a Sailor, fuddled and talking to himself. He enters, singing.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
When with the comic muse a bard hath dealing
Page No:
pp.266-267
Poem Title:
Epilogue to False Delicacy...Spoken by Mrs. Dancer.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Well ladies so much for the tragic style
Page No:
pp.268-269
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Cleone.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Shenstone.
Attributed To:
William Shenstone
First Line:
What horrors fill the tragic poet's brain
Page No:
pp.269-270
Poem Title:
Epilogue upon Prologues.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Who but has read if you have read at all
Page No:
pp.270-271
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Maid of Bath.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Who but has seen the celebrated strife
Page No:
pp.271-272
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Brothers...Spoken by Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
What various revolutions in our art
Page No:
pp.272-273
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Lyar.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whenever physicians wrangle with each other
Page No:
pp.273-274
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Widow'd Wife
Attribution:
By a Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well sirs I know not how the play may pass
Page No:
p.275
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Double Gallant, Or, The Sick Lady's Cure.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well she has had her frolic and has made
Page No:
pp.276-277
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Wishes. Spoken by Miss Elliot.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What strange odd maggots fill an author's pate
Page No:
pp.277-278
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Discovery.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well thank my stars that I have done my task
Page No:
pp.278-279
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Author...Spoken by Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Written by a Lady.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well well I'll do your business honest friend
Page No:
pp.279-280
Poem Title:
Epilogue...for the Tragedy of the Earl of Essex.
Attribution:
Design'd by Mr. Foote,
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
While our grave hermit busy above stairs
Page No:
pp.280-281
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Alfred.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well ladies am I right or am I not
Page No:
pp.281-282
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the School for Lovers. Spoken before the Dance, by Mrs. Yates and Mr. Palmer, in the Characters of Araminta and Modely.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whoever begot thee has no cause to blush
Page No:
pp.282-283
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Conscious Lovers. Spoken by Mr. Shuter, in the Character of a Man-Midwife.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well now we've done I'll feed my sex's failing
Page No:
pp.283-285
Poem Title:
Dialogue-Epilogue to the Careless Husband. Spoken by Lady B. Modish, and Ld. Foppington.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What various modes prevail in various parts
Page No:
pp.285-286
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Spanish Barber...Spoken by Miss Farren.
Attribution:
Said to be Written by D. Garrick, Esq.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
When Philip's son led forth his warlike band
Page No:
pp.286-287
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Siege of Aquilea.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While modern tragedy by rule exact
Page No:
pp.287-288
Poem Title:
Prologue to Philaster. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Wit bears so thin a crop this duller age
Page No:
pp.288-289
Poem Title:
Prologue to Love's Last Shift, or, the Fool in Fashion...Spoken by Mr. Verbruggen.
Attribution:
Written by a Friend.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
War is no more those thunders cease to roll
Page No:
pp.289-290
Poem Title:
Prologue To Elvira.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Why to this farce this title given
Page No:
pp.290-291
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Male-Coquet.
Attribution:
Written and Spoken by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
When strife disturbs or sloth corrupts an age
Page No:
pp.291-292
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Beaux Stratagem. Spoken by Mr. Wilks.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When first the haughty critic's dreadful rage
Page No:
pp.292-293
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Way To Keep Him. Spoken by Mr. Holland.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When vice or folly overruns a state
Page No:
pp.293-294
Poem Title:
An Occasional Prologue Spoken at Covent-Garden Theatre, by Mr. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whenever the brave the generous and the just
Page No:
pp.294-295
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Earl of Essex...Spoken by Mr. Sheridan.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Murphy.
Attributed To:
Arthur Murphy
First Line:
With glory satiate from the bustling stage
Page No:
pp.295-296
Poem Title:
Epilogue...Spoken by Mrs. Clive, on quitting the Stage.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Walpole.
Attributed To:
Horace Walpole
First Line:
What various transformations we remark
Page No:
pp.296-297
Poem Title:
Prologue to A Trip To Scarborough. Altered from Vanburgh's Relapse, or Virtue in Danger. Spoken by Mr. King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With doubt joy apprehension almost dumb
Page No:
pp.297-298
Poem Title:
Prologue Spoke to Much Ado About Nothing. (Acted by Command of his Majesty,) By Mr. Garrick. Being his first Appearance on the Stage, after his Return from Italy.
Attribution:
By Mr. Garrick,
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
When first in falling Greece's evil hour
Page No:
pp.298-299
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Upholsterer. Spoken by Mr. Mossop.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When learning's triumph over her barbarous foes
Page No:
pp.300-301
Poem Title:
Prologue At the opening of the Theatre in Drury-Lane, 1747... Spoken By Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. S. Johnson.
Attributed To:
Samuel Johnson
First Line:
Ye wedded critics who have marked our tale
Page No:
pp.301-302
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Edward and Eleonora...Spoken by Mrs. Mattocks.
Attribution:
Written by R. Sheridan, Esq.
Attributed To:
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
First Line:
Ye glittering train whom lace and velvet bless
Page No:
p.303
Poem Title:
Prologue to Irene.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye social friends of claret and of wit
Page No:
pp.304-305
Poem Title:
The Picture of a Playhouse; Or, Bucks Have At Ye All.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Your servants kind masters from bottom to top
Page No:
pp.305-306
Poem Title:
Prologue to Dr. Last in his Chariot...Spoken by Mr. Foote.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ye belles ye beaux of whatsoever degree
Page No:
pp.306-307
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Trip to Scotland. Spoken by Cupid, in the Habit of a Postilion.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You've seen one orphan ruined here and I
Page No:
pp.307-308
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Orphan; or, the Unhappy Marriage.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You see the tripping dame could find no favour
Page No:
pp.308-309
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Fair Penitent. Spoken by Mrs. Bracegirdle, who played Lavinia.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed