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The Works of Horace in English by Several Hands [Vol 2] [T52759] [ECCO]

DMI number:
918
Publication Date:
1759
Volume Number:
2 of 2
ESTC number:
T52759
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW112619418
Full Title:
THE | WORKS | OF | [i]HORACE[/i] | In ENGLISH VERSE. | By SEVERAL HANDS. | ILLUSTRATED WITH | NOTES HISTORICAL and CRITICAL. | [Rule] | VOLUME the SECOND and LAST. | [Double rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed for R. and J. DODSLEY, in [i]Pall-Mall.[/i] | [Short rule] | M.DCC.LIX.
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of translations/imitations
Format:
Octavo
Bibliographic details:
Separate title pages for the individual sections. Odes, Book 5 is dedicated to John Lord Willoughby de Broke; Satires, Book 2 to Thomas Lord Bishop of Kildare; Epistles, Book 1 to Glocester Ridley; Epistles, Book 2 to Sneyd Davies; Epistles, Book 3 (i.e. Art of Poetry) to Isaac Pacatus Shard.
Comments:
BL ESTC and ECCO record date of publication as 1757 (M.DCC.LVII.); however, title page of second volume states 1759. Attributions: title page of 'The Fifth Book of the Odes of Horace. Commonly Called the Epodes' and 'The First Book of the Epistles of Horace' both identify 'John Duncombe, M. A.' as the author; unless authorship is otherwise stated, Duncombe is assumed to be the author of the poems in these sections.
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Contents: pp. iii-v; Errata: [1p] End matter: "Various Readings and Corrections" [601-622]
Related Miscellanies
Title:
The Works of Horace in English by Several Hands [Vol 1] [T52759] [ECCO]
Publication Date:
1757
ESTC No:
T52759
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Related People
Author:
Robert Dodsley
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Author:
William Duncombe
Confidence:
Confident (50%)
Comments:
Editor:
John Duncombe
Confidence:
Confident (50%)
Comments:
Publisher:
James Dodsley
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
You in Liburnian barks my friend
Page No:
pp.1-3
Poem Title:
Ode I. To Maecenas.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Blessed as our sires of old is he
Page No:
pp.4-8
Poem Title:
Ode II. The Praises of a Country Life.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Thrice happy who free from ambition and pride
Page No:
pp.8-11
Poem Title:
The Same Ode Imitated.
Attribution:
By Another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Should impious sons in future times
Page No:
pp.12-13
Poem Title:
Ode III. To Maecenas
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
When wolves no longer lambs pursue
Page No:
pp.14-15
Poem Title:
Ode IV. To Menas, Pompey's Freed-man.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
But by the gods in heaven whose sway
Page No:
pp.16-24
Poem Title:
Ode V. Canidia.
Attribution:
By William Duncombe, Esq;
Attributed To:
William Duncombe
First Line:
Why barkst thou at the harmless guest
Page No:
pp.24-25
Poem Title:
Ode VI. To Cassius Severus.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Say ye vile race what frenzy draws
Page No:
pp.26-27
Poem Title:
Ode VII. To the Roman People.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
When in large draughts of hoarded wine
Page No:
pp.28-31
Poem Title:
Ode IX. To Maecenas.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
In an unlucky hour the ship
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
Ode X. On Maevius.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Ah Pettius I no more indite
Page No:
pp.34-36
Poem Title:
Ode XI. To Pettius.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
See gathering clouds obscure the sky
Page No:
pp.36-39
Poem Title:
Ode XIII. To a Friend.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
I grieve to hear you oft enquire
Page No:
pp.39-41
Poem Title:
Ode XIV. To Maecenas.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Twas night and Cynthia with her starry train
Page No:
pp.41-42
Poem Title:
Ode XV. To Neaera.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
A second age in wars we waste away
Page No:
pp.42-46
Poem Title:
Ode XVI. To the Roman People.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
At length thy powerful arts I own
Page No:
pp.47-49
Poem Title:
Ode XVII. To Canidia.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Why do thy prayers thus stun my ear
Page No:
pp.50-52
Poem Title:
Canidia's Answer.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section titlepage]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Phoebus and Cynthia over the chase
Page No:
pp.55-64
Poem Title:
The Secular Ode.
Attribution:
By William Duncombe, Esq;
Attributed To:
William Duncombe
First Line:
What is the reason none enjoy the state
Page No:
pp.71-81
Poem Title:
Satire I. Adapted to the Manners of the present Times...That all Men, especially the Covetous, are discontented with their Lot. Addressed to the Right Honourable The Earl of Corke and Orrery.
Attribution:
By I. P. Shard, Esq;
Attributed To:
Isaac Pacatus Shard
First Line:
All songsters in this common fault agree
Page No:
pp.82-96
Poem Title:
Satire III. That we ought to be indulgent to the Imperfections of our Friends, and not look on small Faults as Crimes.
Attribution:
D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The comic poets of the Grecian stage
Page No:
pp.97-106
Poem Title:
Satire IV. He excuses the Liberty taken by Writers of Satire, and especially that which he takes himself.
Attribution:
J. D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Twas a long journey lay before us
Page No:
pp.107-123
Poem Title:
Satire V. A humorous Description of the Author's Journey from Rome to Brundusium.
Attribution:
By William Cowper, Esq;
Attributed To:
William Cowper
First Line:
What though no Lydian on Etruria's coasts
Page No:
pp.124-135
Poem Title:
Satire VI. To Maecenas. The Qualities of true Nobility. Inscribed to the Earl of Corke.
Attribution:
J. D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How Persius on Rupilius King
Page No:
pp.136-140
Poem Title:
Satire VII. An Account of a wrangling Quarrel between Persius and Rupilius King.
Attribution:
J. D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of old a fig-tree useless wood
Page No:
pp.141-146
Poem Title:
Satire VIII. Priapus's Complaint against the Witches, who infested the Hill of Esquiliae.
Attribution:
J. D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sauntering along the street one day
Page No:
pp.147-155
Poem Title:
Satire IX. Adapted to the present Times...The Description of an Impertinent.
Attribution:
By W. C. Esq;
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I said 'tis true Lucilius' lines were rough
Page No:
pp.156-165
Poem Title:
Satire X. Inscribed to John Hawkesworth, LL.D. He justifies the Opinion he had given of Lucilius, and lays down some excellent Rules for writing Satire.
Attribution:
J. D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There are who think my verses are too bold
Page No:
pp.169-177
Poem Title:
Satire I. Horace and Trebatius. He asks the Opinion of Trebatius, an eminent Lawyer, whether he ought to forbear writing Satire.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What and how great the benefits that flow
Page No:
pp.178-190
Poem Title:
Satire II. Of Frugality.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If you so rarely write that through the year
Page No:
pp.191-228
Poem Title:
Satire III. Damasippus. Horace. In this Dialogue Damasippus explains at large, and illustrates by Examples the Doctrine of the Stoics, That every wicked Man is a Fool or Lunatic, as he himself had learned it in a Lecture from the Stoic Philosopher Stertinius.
Attribution:
D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Say Catius whence and whither
Page No:
pp.229-236
Poem Title:
Satire IV. A Dialogue between Horace and Catius, on the Art of Cookery.
Attribution:
J. D.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Besides those things you have already told
Page No:
pp.237-251
Poem Title:
Satire V. Ulysses and Tiresias.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oft has this been my wish's utmost bound
Page No:
pp.252-265
Poem Title:
Satire VI...He compares the Cares and Troubles of a Town Life with the Ease and Pleasure of a Country one.
Attribution:
By Mr. Fawkes.
Attributed To:
Francis Fawkes
First Line:
I long in silence have your orders heard
Page No:
pp.266-278
Poem Title:
Satire VII. A Dialogue between Horace and his Slave. That every Man is a Slave, who is under the Controul of his Passions.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sir I've long waited in my turn to have
Page No:
pp.278-284
Poem Title:
The same Satire Imitated.
Attribution:
By Mr. Christopher Pitt.
Attributed To:
Christopher Pitt
First Line:
How did you fare at wealthy Rufus' feast
Page No:
pp.285-293
Poem Title:
Satire VIII. Horace and Fundanius. A Description of the Feast of Rufus Nasidienus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Twas said you shared a jovial guest
Page No:
pp.294-306
Poem Title:
The Miser's Feast. Being the Same Satire Imitated...A Dialogue between one of the Guests and his Friend.
Attribution:
By Edward Greene Burnaby, Esq;
Attributed To:
Edward Burnaby Greene
First Line:
Beloved Maecenas whom my earliest muse
Page No:
pp.309-321
Poem Title:
Epistle I. To Maecenas.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Whilst with applause at Rome you Lollius plead
Page No:
pp.322-331
Poem Title:
Epistle II. To Lollius.
Attribution:
By I. P. Shard, Esq;
Attributed To:
Isaac Pacatus Shard
First Line:
While you my friend are ever doomed to town
Page No:
pp.332-338
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated...To a Tutor at Trinity College, Dublin.
Attribution:
By a Friend in Ireland.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tell me my Florus on what foreign coast
Page No:
pp.339-342
Poem Title:
Epistle III. To Julius Florus.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
You whom all places in their turns delight
Page No:
pp.342-344
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By Mr. Nevile, Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tibullus candid critic of my lays
Page No:
pp.345-347
Poem Title:
Epistle IV. To Albius Tibullus.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Dear sir to all my trifles you attend
Page No:
pp.348-350
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated...To John Pitt, Esq;
Attribution:
By Mr. Christopher Pitt.
Attributed To:
Christopher Pitt
First Line:
Dear friend whom favouring providence allows
Page No:
pp.350-352
Poem Title:
To a Gentleman, whose Father had left the Bulk of his Estate to a younger Son. In Allusion to the Same Epistle.
Attribution:
By Mr. Say.
Attributed To:
Samuel Say
First Line:
If you can loll on antique beds and eat
Page No:
pp.353-355
Poem Title:
Epistle V. To Torquatus.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Since you dear Dan without a courtly Sneer
Page No:
pp.356-358
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By a Friend in Ireland.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Nought to admire Numicius is the best
Page No:
pp.359-365
Poem Title:
Epistle VI. To Numicius. That a wise Man admires nothing but Virtue.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
With steady wing between extremes to soar
Page No:
pp.366-371
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By Another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Five days I told you I from town should stay
Page No:
pp.372-380
Poem Title:
Epistle VII. To Maecenas.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Tis true my lord I gave my word
Page No:
pp.381-384
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By Mr. Pope and Dr. Swift.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
Jonathan Swift
First Line:
On Nero's secretary muse attend
Page No:
pp.385-387
Poem Title:
Epistle VIII. To Celsus Albinovanus.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Haste muse to Spithead and if winds do not alter
Page No:
pp.388-389
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Septimius only strange as it may seem
Page No:
pp.390-391
Poem Title:
Epistle IX. To Claudius Tiberius Nero.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Dear Dick however it comes into his head
Page No:
pp.391-392
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated...To the Right Hon. Robert Harley, Esq;
Attribution:
By Mr. Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
I lover of the country to my friend
Page No:
pp.393-398
Poem Title:
Epistle X. To Fuscus Aristius.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Dellius of rural scenes a lover grown
Page No:
pp.399-402
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By Another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tell me Bullatius did the sight
Page No:
pp.403-406
Poem Title:
Epistle XI. To Bullatius.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Still my dear Lord do fair Italia's shores
Page No:
pp.407-409
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated...To Charles Earl of Middlesex.
Attribution:
By George Lord Bishop of Derry. [Footnote: Now Lord Primate of Ireland]
Attributed To:
George Stone
First Line:
Since now Agrippa to your hands
Page No:
pp.410-415
Poem Title:
Epistle XII. To Iccius.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Between what you collect and what you set
Page No:
pp.415-417
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated...To a Politician.
Attribution:
By Another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Vinius as you have heard me oft command
Page No:
pp.418-419
Poem Title:
Epistle XIII. To Vinius Asella.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Boy haste away with careful place
Page No:
pp.420-422
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By Edward Greene Burnaby, Esq;
Attributed To:
Edward Burnaby Greene
First Line:
You that overlook my woods and little farm
Page No:
pp.423-427
Poem Title:
Epistle XIV. To his Country Steward.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Yes though my friends engaging arts employ
Page No:
pp.427-430
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By Mr. Nevile.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With wonted truth dear Vala tell your friend
Page No:
pp.430-434
Poem Title:
Epistle XV. To Numonius Vala.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Should you dear Quintius ask me if in grounds
Page No:
pp.435-443
Poem Title:
Epistle XVI. To Quintius.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Though no advice you need by which to steer
Page No:
pp.444-452
Poem Title:
Epistle XVII. To Scaeva.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Self-taught though Brevil nicely can discern
Page No:
pp.452-456
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By Another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You scorn my Lollius if I judge aright
Page No:
pp.457-467
Poem Title:
Epistle XVIII. To Lollius.
Attribution:
By I. P. Shard, Esq;
Attributed To:
Isaac Pacatus Shard
First Line:
Spence with a friend you pass the hours away
Page No:
pp.468-473
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated...To Mr. Spence, When Tutor to the Earl of Middlesex.
Attribution:
By Mr. Christopher Pitt.
Attributed To:
Christopher Pitt
First Line:
To old Cratinus if you credit give
Page No:
pp.474-478
Poem Title:
Epistle XIX. To Maecenas.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Tis said dear sir no poets please the town
Page No:
pp.479-481
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated...To Mr. Lowth.
Attribution:
By Mr. Christopher Pitt.
Attributed To:
Christopher Pitt
First Line:
Your thoughts my book with sorrow I discern
Page No:
pp.482-486
Poem Title:
Epistle XX.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
Charmed with the lettered lustre of the press
Page No:
pp.487-488
Poem Title:
The Same Epistle Imitated.
Attribution:
By John Duncombe, M. A. [section title page]
Attributed To:
John Duncombe
First Line:
A cavalier the men of ancient date
Page No:
pp.489-492
Poem Title:
The latter Part of Satire II. Book II. Imitated.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While you affairs so many and so great
Page No:
pp.495-523
Poem Title:
Epistle I. To Augustus.
Attribution:
Translated by William Duncombe, Esq; [section title page]
Attributed To:
William Duncombe
First Line:
O Florus Friend of Nero good and brave
Page No:
pp.524-536
Poem Title:
Epistle II. To Julius Florus.
Attribution:
Translated by William Duncombe, Esq; [section title page]
Attributed To:
William Duncombe
First Line:
To a man's head suppose a painter joins
Page No:
pp.547-574
Poem Title:
The Art of Poetry. Addressed to L. Piso, and his Two Sons.
Attribution:
Translated by the Same Hand. [i.e. William Duncombe] Prose argument. Footnotes.
Attributed To:
William Duncombe