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The works of Monsieur Boileau. Made English by several hands. [Vol II] [ECCO] [N25822]

DMI number:
380
Aliases
Works of Boileau
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Evidence:
Publication Date:
1736
Volume Number:
2 of 2
ESTC number:
N25822
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW3317261861
Shelfmark:
ECCO - Nottingham UL; Huntington.
Full Title:
FULL TITLE 1: THE | WORKS |OF | Mons.[i]Boileau Despreaux[/i].| [rule] | VOLUME II. | [rule] | CONTAINING | I. LONGINUS's Treatise of the [i]SUBLIME[/i]. | With Critical Reflections on some Passage out of | [i]Longinus[/i] ; wherein Answer is occasionally made to | some Objections of Monsieur [i]Perault[/i] against [i]Homer[/i] | and [i]Pindar : [/i] Likewise further Remarks and Ob- | servations by [i]Dacier[/i], [i]Boivin[/i], &c. | II. MISCELLANIES, with a Discourse upon [i]Satire[/i]. | [rule] | The SECOND EDITION.| [rule] | [rule] | [i]LONDON[/i]: | Printed and sold by W. SHROPSHIRE, against the Duke of [i]Grafton[/i]'s | in [i]New Bond-Street[/i] ; and EDWARD LITTLETON, at the [i]Mitre[/i] | against St. [i]Dunstan[/i]'s Church in [i]Fleet-Street[/i]. M.DCC.XXXVI. FULL TITLE 2: POSTHUMOUS | WORKS | OF | Monsieur [i]Boileau[/i], | [i]VIZ[/i] | [column 1] I. A SATIRE upon EQUIVOCA- | TION, against the [i]Jesuits[/i]. | II. Seventeen New EPIGRAMS. | III. The HEROES [i]Romances[/i]. A | Dialogue after the Manner | of LUCIAN. | IV. A Discourse upon the [i]Style[/i] | of [i]Inscriptions[/i]. | V. LETTERS to M. RACINE, | M. LE VERRIER, &c. | VI. Three New Reflections up- | on LONGINUS. [/column1] | [column 2] VII. A Critical Dispute be- | tween Monsieur BOILEAU, | M. HUET, Bp. Of [i]Avranches[/i], | and M. LE CLERC ; concern- | ing the SUBLIMITY of this | Passage in [i]Genesis[/i] ; [i]And God | said, Let there be Light[/i] : [i]And | there was Light[/i]. Chap. i. 3. | VIII. M. LE VERRIER�s Speech | to the [i]French[/i] Academy, upon | the Death of M. BOILEAU[/column 2]. | [rule] | Made [i]English[/i] by Several Hands. | [rule] | THE SECOND EDITION. | [rule] | [rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed and sold by W. SHROPSHIRE, against the Duke | of [i]Grafton[/i]�s in [i]New[/i] [i]Bond-Street[/i] ; and EDWARD | LITTLETON, at the [i]Mitre[/i] against St. [i]Dunstan[/i]�s | Church in [i]Fleet-Street[/i]. M. DCC.XXXVI.
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of translations/imitations
Format:
Octavo
Pagination:
640pp.
Bibliographic details:
Reissue of 1714 (2nd edition); 2 vols; Pagination restarts after �Remarks upon M. Boileau�s Tenth Reflections upon Longinus�(p.170). Pagination and signatures restart at �A Treatise of the Sublime� . Pages 203-236 omitted. Mispagination (pp.243-251 printed as 143-151). Engraved plate on frontispiece.
Comments:
QUERY 1: check pagination QUERY 2: check contents description + contents include lots of quotations - do these need removing? Query 3: ought the Posthumous works of Boileau (i.e. the first section of this) to be bundled here? CONTENTS: (1) Posthumous Works of Monsieur Boileau (A Satire against Equivocation) pp. 1-20 (2) An Examination of the Opinion of Longinus upon this Passage in Genesis, Chap. 1. verse 3. And God said, let the light be made, and the light was made pp. 21-50 (Prose) (3) Three New Reflections on Longinus pp. 51-77 (Prose with some verse quotations) (4) A Discourse upon the Style of Inscriptions pp. 78-80 (Prose) (5) New Epigrams pp. 81-92 (Verse) (6) Advertisement concerning an opera; prologue pp. 93-99 (prose and verse) (7) Letters to Le Verrier and Racine pp. 100-108 (prose with verse quotations) (8) Les Heros de Roman. The Heroes of Romances. A Dialogue after the manner of Lucian. pp. 109-142 (prose introduction; dialogue) (separate title page, pp. ??) (9) Appendix pp. 143-153 (10) Remarks upon Boileau's Tenth Reflection pp. 154-170 (11) Verse epistles pp. 1-102 (12) New Epistles pp. 107-143 (separate title page p. ??; preface pp. ??) (13) Odes, Epigrams and other Miscellanies pp. 144-189 (separate title page p. ?? (14) A Treatise of the Sublime pp. 1-168 (separate title page p. ??) (prose with verse quotations) (15) Letters to Perrault pp. 169-202 (16) A Dialogue of the Dead pp. 237-256 (17) Letters between Boileau and Maucroix pp. 257-267.
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Advertisement (1p); Frontispiece; title-page 1; dedication 'To the Right Honourable Charles Lord Halifax' (1p); Preface (4pp); �Speech [...] Upon the Death of M. Boileau� (sig.b1-b6); Advertisement (sig.b6v-b8v); title-page 2. End matter: Contents pages (sig. M2r-v), (sig.R8v); Index (sig.S1-S8v).
Related Miscellanies
Title:
Posthumous works of Monsieur Boileau [T143905]
Publication Date:
1713
ESTC No:
T143905
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The works of Monsieur Boileau. Made English by several hands [Vol I] [T143904]
Publication Date:
1712
ESTC No:
T143904
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The works of Monsieur Boileau. Made English by several hands [Vol II] [T143904]
Publication Date:
1711
ESTC No:
T143904
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The works of Monsieur Boileau. Made English by several hands. [Vol I] [ECCO] [N25822]
Publication Date:
1736
ESTC No:
N25822
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Related People
Sold by:
Edward Littleton
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Printed and sold by W. SHROPSHIRE, against the Duke of Grafton's in New Bond-Street ; and EDWARD LITTLETON, at the Mitre against St. Dunstan's Church in Fleet-Street.'
Translated from:
Nicolas Boileau Despréaux
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Sold by:
W. Shropshire
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Printed and sold by W. SHROPSHIRE, against the Duke of Grafton's in New Bond-Street ; and EDWARD LITTLETON, at the Mitre against St. Dunstan's Church in Fleet-Street.'
Content/Publication
First Line:
Equivocation of infernal kind
Page No:
pp.1-20
Poem Title:
A Satire against Equivocation and Mental Reservation, wherein the Author attacks the loose Principles of the Jesuits.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Shake off the error that obscures your view
Page No:
p.58
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Mean while the father full of dreadful care
Page No:
p.62
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Who to his mother with his little hand
Page No:
p.64
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
Mean time by mighty gusts a humid mountain
Page No:
pp.74-75
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
He that can put a bridle on the waves
Page No:
p.77
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Mistake not fathers read it once again
Page No:
pp.81-82
Poem Title:
Epigram. On my Brother's Book, Intitled, Historia Flagellantium, sive de recto & perverso usu flagrorum apud Christianos; i.e. The History of Scourging, or an Account of the good and bad use of it amongst Christians.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To send me madam in this picture here
Page No:
p.82
Poem Title:
To the President * * * Lady, who sent me the Picture of Father Bourdaloue.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Come philosophers come you that boast in your learning
Page No:
p.83
Poem Title:
A Drinking Song made at 17 Years of Age, having just finish'd my course of Philosophy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Brebeuf in well deserving lines
Page No:
p.84
Poem Title:
A Burlesque Parodie of the first Ode of Pindar, in Praise of M. Perrault.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The tuneful sisters at Apollo's call
Page No:
p.85
Poem Title:
On Homer.
Attribution:
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First Line:
Sworn foe to sleep I am and many a time
Page No:
p.86
Poem Title:
A Riddle.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
The pride and honour of the Gallic stage
Page No:
p.86
Poem Title:
Verses to put under the Picture of M. Racine.
Attribution:
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First Line:
When with stiff air and awkward grace
Page No:
pp.86-87
Poem Title:
On the Poet S--- reciting his own Verses.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Paulus the famous quack renowned afar
Page No:
p.87
Poem Title:
An Imitation of Martial.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Tis said that Juno Jupiter and Mars
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
On Monsieur Perrault.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In charming infancy's disguise
Page No:
pp.88-89
Poem Title:
Verses to put under the Picture of the Duke of Maine, as yet a Child, who had publish'd a Volume of Letters with his Effigies prefix'd, in the garb of Apollo, with a Crown on his head.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When in the senate honest Paul
Page No:
p.89
Poem Title:
On the Speech of a Magistrate, who inveigh'd against Sollicitors at Law.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Six clocks two watches to prepare
Page No:
p.90
Poem Title:
On One that delighted in Clock-work.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The poet Boileau's picture here you see
Page No:
p.90
Poem Title:
Verses put under my Picture, that was ill Grav'd.
Attribution:
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First Line:
My rhyme unforced attends to reasons call
Page No:
pp.91-92
Poem Title:
Upon my Picture. My Friend M. Le Verrier, wrote the Four following Verses under my Picture, engraven by M. Drevet, making me speak thus.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Yes thou mayst apoplexies cure
Page No:
p.91
Poem Title:
On the Waters of Bourbon, which when the Author was drinking, an indifferent Poet shew'd him some of his Verses. He addresses himself to the Well.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Thanks to the mighty Phidias of our age
Page No:
p.92
Poem Title:
On a Marble Busto of the Author, made by Mons. Girardon chief Statuary to the King.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
And dost thou music think to charm
Page No:
pp.96-99
Poem Title:
Prologue. Poetry and Musick.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Thou charming scene whom Flora's powers adorn
Page No:
pp.101-102
Poem Title:
A Complaint against the Tuileries.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Or in cold couplets careless of the fair
Page No:
p.102
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
Who acts sincerely as my laws require
Page No:
pp.106-107
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
Yet some grave doctorson their private word
Page No:
p.106
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
Even Phaenicia does declare
Page No:
p.125
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
How happy would it be to love
Page No:
p.130
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
Oh let me the wonder of our days
Page No:
p.130
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
Great prince for from this hour I'll call you great
Page No:
pp.136-137
Poem Title:
Verses taken out of M. P--- Poem of the Maid of Orleans.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Duonis great heart the greatest ever was known
Page No:
p.138
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
For that magnanimous front those heavenly eyes
Page No:
p.138
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
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First Line:
Young valiant hero thou whose sense sublime
Page No:
pp.1-11
Poem Title:
A Discourse to the King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain great sir keen satire I disown
Page No:
pp.11-24
Poem Title:
Epistle I. To the King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
For what should I my sleeping muse awake
Page No:
pp.25-28
Poem Title:
Epistle II. To The Abbot Des Roches.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Yes Arnauld thou dost easily perceive
Page No:
pp.29-36
Poem Title:
Epistle III. To Monsieur Arnauld. Doctor of the Sorbonne.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain to praise thee is my muse prepared
Page No:
pp.37-48
Poem Title:
Epistle IV. To the King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Born for a court and versed in every art
Page No:
pp.49-60
Poem Title:
Epistle V. To Monsieur De Guilleragues. Secretary of the Cabinet.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Yes yes Lamoignon with the town I'm tired
Page No:
pp.61-74
Poem Title:
Epistle VI. To Monsieur De Lamoignon, Attorney-General.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh with what art Racine dost thou inspire
Page No:
pp.75-82
Poem Title:
Epistle VII. To Monsieur Racine.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Cease sir to conquer or I cease to write
Page No:
pp.83-90
Poem Title:
Epistle VIII. To the King.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Cowper how foolish would that author be
Page No:
pp.91-102
Poem Title:
Epistle IX. To the Marquis de Seignelai. Inscrib'd to the Right Honourable The Lord Chancellor Cowper.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain my muse I bid you hold in vain
Page No:
pp.107-116
Poem Title:
Epistle X. To my Book.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thou as laborious as thy master kind
Page No:
p.117-125
Poem Title:
Epistle XI. To my Gard'ner.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Learned sir you're right for all engaged in sin
Page No:
pp.126-143
Poem Title:
Epistle XII. To the Abbot Renaudot. On the Love of God.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
What learned fury in my breast does reign
Page No:
pp.157-168
Poem Title:
An Ode On the Taking of Namur, Anno 1692.
Attribution:
Made English by Samuel Cobb, M.A. Late of Trinity-College, Cambridge
Attributed To:
Samuel Cobb
First Line:
What fury what distraction blinds
Page No:
sigs.m*-[?m*2v?]
Poem Title:
An Ode, Written in the Year, 1656. On a Report, That Cromwell and the English were going to make War upon France.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
A poor old wretch beneath the weight
Page No:
pp.169-170
Poem Title:
A Fable out of AEsop. The Old Man and Death.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In want and what's a greater curse
Page No:
p.170
Poem Title:
Epigram. The Grateful Debtor.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Behold in peace and war a monarch great
Page No:
p.171
Poem Title:
Verses to be put under the King's Busto, (made by the Famous Statuary M. Girardon,) the Year the Germans took Belgrade.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The holy maid whom in this piece you view
Page No:
p.172
Poem Title:
Verses to be put under Mademoiselle de Lamoignon's Picture.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How doubly sweet is Baville's air
Page No:
pp.173-174
Poem Title:
A Catch made at Baville, when Father Bourdaloue was there.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye partisans of Epicurus tribe
Page No:
p.174
Poem Title:
Verses to be put before an Allegorical Romance, wherein the whole Morality of the Stoics was explain'd.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Come Pradon and you Bonnecorse
Page No:
pp.175-176
Poem Title:
To Messieurs Pradon and Bonnecorse, who both at the same time publish'd a Book of Scandal against me.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Yes I have said an Aesculapian sot
Page No:
p.175
Poem Title:
Epigram. To a Physician.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Three emperors as 'tis in story told
Page No:
p.176
Poem Title:
Epigram. To Monsieur Perrault. On his Books against the Ancients.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Did Perrault the assassin ever give
Page No:
p.177
Poem Title:
On Monsieur Perrault the Physician.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How comes it Perrault I would gladly know
Page No:
p.177
Poem Title:
Another on the same Subject.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With young Orante from the cradle bred
Page No:
pp.178-179
Poem Title:
Sonnet, upon a Cousin of mine that died very young, in the Hands of a Quack.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Clio complained upon a time
Page No:
pp.179-180
Poem Title:
Epigram. Occasion'd by some Verses that were read in the Academy against Homer and Virgil.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all the pens which my poor rhymes molest
Page No:
p.180
Poem Title:
Epigram. Upon a Paultry Satire which the Abbot Cotin handed about under my Name.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
This traveller from Paris used to run
Page No:
p.181
Poem Title:
Verses to be put under the Picture of Monsieur Tavernier, the famous Traveller.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Why so much pains that like a lasting brand
Page No:
p.181
Poem Title:
Another against the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let the self lover these strict lessons learn
Page No:
p.182
Poem Title:
Verses to put under the Picture of Monsieur de la Bruyere, before his Book, entitul'd, The Manners of the Age. The Author Speaks.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With knowledge wit and eloquence adorned
Page No:
p.182
Poem Title:
Verses to be put under the Picture of the late Monsieur Hamon, Physician of Port-Royal.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain a thousand jealous wits
Page No:
pp.183-184
Poem Title:
Stanzas. To Monsieur Moliere, upon his Comedy, call'd, L' Ecole de Femmes, or, The School of Women, which several carpt at.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My friend Bilain as yesterday
Page No:
p.185
Poem Title:
Another.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While in his double elbow chair
Page No:
p.185
Poem Title:
Epigram. Against an Atheist.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Climene something has perplexed me
Page No:
p.186
Poem Title:
Epigram. To Climene.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hail king of horses noble Rosinante
Page No:
p.186
Poem Title:
A Tetrastic. On the Picture of Don Quixote's Horse Rosinante.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While the fierce beadle's brat does loudly bawl
Page No:
p.187
Poem Title:
Upon a Young Lawyer, the Son of a Country Beadle.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My friend Marullus I'm uneasy
Page No:
p.188
Poem Title:
On Marullus banter'd formerly in Phaleucian Verses.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Curse on the wretch whose rage to be a wit
Page No:
p.189
Poem Title:
Verses in Chapelain's Style, to be put at the end of his Poem of the Maid (of Orleans.)
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed