Blacklight

Additions to the works of Alexander Pope, Esq. [T5466] [ECCO]

DMI number:
1242
Publication Date:
1776
Volume Number:
1 of 2
ESTC number:
T5466
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW114461592
Shelfmark:
ECCO - nearest hard copy is in BL
Full Title:
ADDITIONS | TO THE WORKS OF | ALEXANDER POPE, ESQ. | TOGETHER WITH | MANY ORIGINAL POEMS AND LETTERS, | OF COTEMPORARY WRITERS. | NEVER BEFORE PUBLISHED. IN TWO VOLUMES. | VOL. I. | [epigraph] | DUBLIN: Printed for W. Watson, J. Potts, J. Williams, W. Colles, W. Wilson, T. Walker, C. Jenkin, R. Moncriesse, | M. Mills, J. Hillary, J. Beatty, J. Exshaw. | M,DCC,LXXVI.
Epigraph:
--- foliis tantum ne carmina manda, | Ne turbata volent rapidis ludibria ventis. VIRGIL. | --- pulverem Olympicum | Collegisse juvat: HOR.
Place of Publication:
Dublin
Format:
Duodecimo
Bibliographic details:
double title page
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: preface [v-xvii]; contents [xix-xxiv]; list of letters [xxiv]
Content/Publication
First Line:
Dear damned distracting town farewell
Page No:
pp.1-4
Poem Title:
A Farewell to London. In the Year 1714.
Attribution:
By Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
In this strange town a different course we take
Page No:
pp.4-5
Poem Title:
These Lines were added by Mr. Pope after the present Conclusion of his Address to Miss Martha Blount, on her leaving Town, &c. "As some fond Virgin, &c."
Attribution:
Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Generous gay and gallant nation
Page No:
p.6
Poem Title:
The following Lines were sung by Durastanti when she took her Leave of the English Stage. The Words were in Haste put together by Mr. Pope, at the request of the Earl of Peterborow.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Puppies whom I now am leaving
Page No:
p.7
Poem Title:
A Burlesque of the same Lines. By Dr. Arbuthnot.
Attribution:
Dr. Arbuthnot.
Attributed To:
John Arbuthnot
First Line:
Then he went to the side board and called for much liquor
Page No:
p.8
Poem Title:
A Fragment of Stanzas, taken from Mr. Pope's own Hand-writing.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Well then poor Gay lies under ground
Page No:
p.8
Poem Title:
Mr. Gay's Epitaph. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Here lies Lord Coningsby be civil
Page No:
p.9
Poem Title:
Lord Coningsby's Epitaph. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
The stern Pelides' rage O Goddess sing
Page No:
pp.9-10
Poem Title:
The beginning Lines of Homer's Iliad as originally translated by Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Since my old friend is grown so great
Page No:
p.10
Poem Title:
Dialogue. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
I am his highness' dog at Kew
Page No:
p.11
Poem Title:
Epigram. By Mr. Pope. Engrav'd on the Collar of a Dog, which I gave to his Royal Highness.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
If added days of life bring nothing new
Page No:
p.11
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Martha Blount, on her Birth-Day, 1724. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Adam had fallen twice if for an apple
Page No:
p.12
Poem Title:
IV.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
They may talk of the goddesses in Ida vales
Page No:
p.12
Poem Title:
II.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
In the lines that you sent are the muses and graces
Page No:
p.12
Poem Title:
I.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
On Sunday at six in the street that's called Gerrard
Page No:
p.12
Poem Title:
V.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
You Bellenden Griffin and little Lepell
Page No:
p.12
Poem Title:
III.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Respect to Dryden Sheffield justly paid
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
On Butler's Monument. Perhaps by Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Perhaps by Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
So by each bard an alderman shall sit
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
You say A--'s a wit for what
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
VI.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Some Colinaeus praise some Bleau
Page No:
pp.14-15
Poem Title:
Verses to be prefixed before Bernard Lintot's New Miscellany. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
See sir here's the grand approach
Page No:
pp.15-16
Poem Title:
Upon the Duke of Marlborough's House at Woodstock. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
In beauty or wit
Page No:
pp.16-17
Poem Title:
To Lady Mary Wortley Montague. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
The maid is blessed that will not hear
Page No:
pp.18-19
Poem Title:
A Version of the First Psalm. For the Use of a young Lady. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
How much egregious Moore are we
Page No:
pp.19-21
Poem Title:
To the ingenious Mr. Moore, Author of the celebrated Worm-Powder. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
O son of Tydeus cease be wise and see
Page No:
p.19
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Mr. Pope ... Homer
Attributed To:
Homer
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Say St John who alone peruse
Page No:
pp.21-23
Poem Title:
The Fourth Epistle of the First Book of Horace's Epistles. A modern Imitation. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
With no poetic ardour fired
Page No:
p.24
Poem Title:
Verses left by Mr. Pope, on his lying in the same Bed which Wilmot the celebrated Earl of Rochester slept in at Adderbury, then belonging to the Duke of Argyle, July 9th, 1739.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
The tribe of templars players apothecaries
Page No:
pp.25-43
Poem Title:
Sober Advice from Horace, to the Young Gentlemen about Town. As delivered in his Second Sermon. Imitated in the Manner of Mr. Pope. Together with the original Text, as restored by The Rev. Richard Bentley, D.D. And some Remarks on the Version.
Attribution:
[Pope]
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Dear Mr Cromwell | May it please ye
Page No:
pp.44-48
Poem Title:
An Epistle to Henry Cromwell, Esq. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Ozell at Sanger's call invoked his muse
Page No:
p.49
Poem Title:
The Translator. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Roxana from the court returning late
Page No:
pp.49-51
Poem Title:
Roxana, or the Drawing-Room. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
With scornful mien and various toss of air
Page No:
p.52
Poem Title:
The Looking-Glass. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
To one fair lady out of court
Page No:
pp.53-55
Poem Title:
The Challenge. A Court Ballad. By Mr. Pope. To the Tune of, To all you Ladies now at Land, &c.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Of gentle Philips will I ever sing
Page No:
p.55
Poem Title:
The Three Gentle Shepherds. By Mr. Pope.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
But our great Turks in wit must reign alone
Page No:
p.56
Poem Title:
Lines copied from Mr. Pope's Hand-writing, on a Scrap of Paper.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Pleasure but cheats us with an empty name
Page No:
pp.57-82
Poem Title:
An Essay on Human Life.
Attribution:
Mr. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Welcome great prince unto this land
Page No:
pp.83-85
Poem Title:
To the Prince of Orange, 1677. By Edmund Waller, of Beaconsfield.
Attribution:
Edmund Waller
Attributed To:
Edmund Waller
First Line:
An oaken broken elbow chair
Page No:
pp.85-86
Poem Title:
A true and faithful Inventory of the Goods belonging to the Dean of St. Patrick's. By Dr. Swift.
Attribution:
Dr. Swift.
Attributed To:
Jonathan Swift
First Line:
Though doomed to small coal yet to arts allied
Page No:
p.86
Poem Title:
Lines written under the Print of Tom Britton the Small-coal-man, painted by Mr. Woolaston. By Mr. Prior.
Attribution:
Mr. Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
I pray lady Harriot the time to assign
Page No:
p.87
Poem Title:
By the same.
Attribution:
[Prior]
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
My noble lovely little Peggy
Page No:
p.87
Poem Title:
A Letter to the Hon. Lady Margaret Cavendish Harley, when a Child. By Mr. Prior.
Attribution:
Mr. Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
However high however cold the fair
Page No:
p.88
Poem Title:
Verses written in Lady Howe's Ovid's Epistles. By Mr. Prior.
Attribution:
Mr. Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
I pray good lord Harley let Jonathan know
Page No:
p.88
Poem Title:
By Mr. Prior, 1716.
Attribution:
Mr. Prior
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
Pen ink and wax and paper send
Page No:
p.88
Poem Title:
To Lord Oxford. Written extempore by Mr. Prior. In Lady Oxford's Study, 1717.
Attribution:
Mr. Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
If wit or honesty could save
Page No:
pp.89-90
Poem Title:
True's Epitaph. By the same.
Attribution:
[Prior]
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
To Richmond and Peterborough Matt gave his letters
Page No:
p.89
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
By Mr. Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
Long hast thou friend been absent from thy soil
Page No:
pp.90-99
Poem Title:
Mr. Pope's Welcome from Greece. A Copy of Verses written by Mr. Gay, Upon Mr. Pope's having finished his Translation of Homer's Iliad.
Attribution:
Mr. Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
I'm no more to converse with the swains
Page No:
p.100
Poem Title:
To the most Honourable the Earl of Oxford, The Lord High Treasurer. The epigrammatical Petition of your Lordship's most humble Servant, John Gay.
Attribution:
John Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Who here blames words or verses songs or singers
Page No:
p.100
Poem Title:
A Motto for the Opera of Mutius Scaevola. By Mr. Gay.
Attribution:
Mr. Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
How blessed the court how lost the fair
Page No:
pp.102-103
Poem Title:
On the forbidding Command to the Duchess of Queensberry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thy dull request my friend give over
Page No:
p.102
Poem Title:
All the seven following Copies of Verses were writen on the foregoing Subject.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain was ministerial breath
Page No:
p.103
Poem Title:
The same paraphrased.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let the knight on beauty lour
Page No:
p.104
Poem Title:
To the Duchess of Queensberry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Says a friend to a knight shall a friend by whose skill
Page No:
pp.105-107
Poem Title:
A Ballad. To the Tune of Lillibullero.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The great ones justly Johnny Gay
Page No:
p.105
Poem Title:
To Johnny Gay.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sillier than Gildon couldst thou be
Page No:
p.108
Poem Title:
Written in Mr. Gay's Works. Presented to a Lady in a very splendid Binding. To the Book.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Two accidents the weekly bills have missed
Page No:
pp.108-109
Poem Title:
On the Forbiddance of Gay's Second Part of the Beggars Opera, and the Damnation of Cibber's Love in a Riddle.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Old poets sing that beasts did dance
Page No:
p.109
Poem Title:
Upon Lady Pembroke's promoting the Catcalling of Faustina, 1727.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Such early wisdom such a lovely face
Page No:
p.109
Poem Title:
The Character of the Lady Henrietta Cavendish Holles. By Mr. Hughes. 1712-13.
Attribution:
Mr. Hughes.
Attributed To:
John Hughes
First Line:
In thee bright maid though all the virtues shine
Page No:
pp.110-111
Poem Title:
To Lady Henrietta Cavendish Holles, On her Choice of Truth, Honour, and Honesty for her Motto. By Mr. Hughes.
Attribution:
Mr. Hughes.
Attributed To:
John Hughes
First Line:
Dear doctor here comes a young virgin untainted
Page No:
pp.111-112
Poem Title:
The humble Petition of a beautiful young Lady, To the Rev. Dr. Berkley, Dean of Londonderry, which he quits to go and settle a College at Bermudas.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Where music and more powerful beauty reign
Page No:
pp.112-113
Poem Title:
Prologue to Music. By Dr. Garth.
Attribution:
Dr. Garth.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Again my garret poverty is shown
Page No:
p.113
Poem Title:
Butler's Complaint against his pretended Monument in Westminster-Abbey. Poeta loquitur.
Attribution:
Butler
Attributed To:
Samuel Butler
First Line:
Argyle his praise when Southerne wrote
Page No:
pp.114-115
Poem Title:
Epigram. In Behalf of Tom Southern, To the Duke of Argyle.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Boast not how Orpheus charmed the rocks
Page No:
p.114
Poem Title:
Epigram. On the Miracles wrought by Cuzzoni.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
This monument for Hudibras
Page No:
p.114
Poem Title:
Two Lines written with Charcoal upon Butler's Monument.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Would you that Delville I describe
Page No:
pp.115-116
Poem Title:
A Description of Dr. Delany's Villa. By Dr. Sheridan.
Attribution:
Dr. Sheridan.
Attributed To:
Thomas Sheridan
First Line:
Who uninspired can tread this sacred ground
Page No:
pp.117-119
Poem Title:
Written in the Right Honourable the Earl of Oxford's Library at Wimpole, 1729. By Soame Jenyns.
Attribution:
Soame Jenyns.
Attributed To:
Soame Jenyns
First Line:
Aspicis hunc plantis qui fulcitur elephantis
Page No:
pp.119-120
Poem Title:
Ragg's Verses to J. Philips.
Attribution:
Edmund Smith.
Attributed To:
Edmund Smith
First Line:
Dubius sed non improbus vixi
Page No:
p.121
Poem Title:
The Duke of Buckingham's Epitaph. Written by Himself, And left in his Will to be fixed on his Monument.
Attribution:
The Duke of Buckingham
Attributed To:
John Sheffield
First Line:
Oft for my king I drew my sword
Page No:
pp.121-122
Poem Title:
Thus translated by George Sewell, M.D. Author of the Tragedy of Sir Walter Raleigh.
Attribution:
George Sewell, M.D.
Attributed To:
George Sewell
First Line:
In days of yore old Abraham Elt
Page No:
p.122
Poem Title:
On Sir Abraham Elt being knighted, and taking the name of Elton.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
M s Ja Craggs Arm
Page No:
p.123
Poem Title:
Epitaph on Mr. Craggs.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Inspired with joy we see the learned throng
Page No:
p.124
Poem Title:
A Westminster Exercise.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
God prosper long our noble king
Page No:
p.125
Poem Title:
A Parson's Resolution.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Here lies Tom Thynne of Longleat Hall
Page No:
p.125
Poem Title:
Epitaph on Mr. Thynne, Who was shot by Coningsmark's Direction.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How perfect Chloris and how free
Page No:
pp.125-127
Poem Title:
To a Lady.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Here lie the bones of Dr Friend
Page No:
p.127
Poem Title:
An Epitaph on Dr. John Friend, the Physician, who died in 1728.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Here lies my wife here let her lie
Page No:
p.127
Poem Title:
Epitaph Intended by Mr. Dryden for his Wife.
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Indulgent nature to each kind bestows
Page No:
p.128
Poem Title:
Upon Dr. Evans, Bursar, cutting down the trees in St. John's College Grove.
Attribution:
Dr. Tadlow
Attributed To:
Charles Tadlow
First Line:
Ten thousand tailors with their length of line
Page No:
p.128
Poem Title:
Dr. Evans upon Dr. Tadlow.
Attribution:
Dr. Evans
Attributed To:
Abel Evans
First Line:
Under this stone both dog and master lie
Page No:
p.128
Poem Title:
Epitaph on Mr. Molesworth, Who erected a Monument, and placed an Inscription upon it in Honour of his favourite Dog.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Old Jacob by deep judgment led
Page No:
p.129
Poem Title:
To be published in the next Edition of Dryden's Virgil.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Why do ye with such disdain refuse
Page No:
pp.129-130
Poem Title:
To a Lady more cruel than fair. By Sir John Vanbrugh.
Attribution:
Sir John Vanbrugh.
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
Ye fathers and mothers
Page No:
pp.131-134
Poem Title:
Upon the Royston Bargain, or Alehouse Wedding; i. e. the Marriage of Mr. Charles Caesar to Miss Long, October 1729.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
From distant climes Lucinda came
Page No:
pp.134-136
Poem Title:
To Mrs. B. to invite her from Viriginia to Bermudas.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When in a state devoid of sense
Page No:
pp.136-140
Poem Title:
A Bermudan Ode. Down-Hall, Sunday, April 10, 1727.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since you dear doctor saved my life
Page No:
pp.141-143
Poem Title:
Sir Charles Hanbury to Sir Hans Sloane, Who saved his Life, and desired him to send over all the Rarities he could find in his Travels.
Attribution:
Sir Charles Hanbury
Attributed To:
Sir Charles Hanbury Williams
First Line:
To you addressing gentle knight
Page No:
p.144
Poem Title:
To Sir Henry Ashurst, at Bath; From Mr. Hanbury.
Attribution:
Mr. Hanbury.
Attributed To:
Sir Charles Hanbury Williams
First Line:
Pray give my services and kisses
Page No:
p.145
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Unwearied at the longest ball
Page No:
p.145
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What do scholars and bards and astrologers wise
Page No:
pp.145-146
Poem Title:
Lord Harvey on the Duchess of Richmond.
Attribution:
Lord Harvey
Attributed To:
John Hervey
First Line:
Thou little favourite of the fair
Page No:
p.146
Poem Title:
On a Collar Presented for Happy Gill. By Mr. Hughes.
Attribution:
Mr. Hughes.
Attributed To:
John Hughes
First Line:
If all who ever invoked the tuneful nine
Page No:
pp.147-148
Poem Title:
Lord Middlesex to Mr. Pope. On reading Mr. Addison's Account of the English Poets.
Attribution:
Lord Middlesex
Attributed To:
Lionel Cranfield Sackville
First Line:
O happy cask coeval with thy lord
Page No:
pp.149-150
Poem Title:
The Twenty-First Ode of the Third Book of Horace, translated. By Lord Middlesex.
Attribution:
Lord Middlesex.
Attributed To:
Lionel Cranfield Sackville
First Line:
Now the full barns with yellow sheaves are stored
Page No:
pp.150-151
Poem Title:
Upon a Goose.
Attribution:
By Lord Middlesex.
Attributed To:
Lionel Cranfield Sackville
First Line:
Young thoughtless gay unfortunately fair
Page No:
pp.150-151
Poem Title:
On Lady A.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tell me from what fat headed Scot
Page No:
p.152
Poem Title:
Dr. Winter's Questions to Dr. Cheney.
Attribution:
Dr. Winter
Attributed To:
John Wynter
First Line:
My system doctor's all my own
Page No:
p.153
Poem Title:
Dr. Cheney's Answer.
Attribution:
Dr. Cheney
Attributed To:
George Cheyne
First Line:
Such artless art did ever mortal see
Page No:
pp.154-155
Poem Title:
Verses on the Art of Politicks.
Attribution:
By the Rev. Mr. Bramston.
Attributed To:
James Bramston
First Line:
Hard by the hall our master's house
Page No:
pp.156-158
Poem Title:
A Ballad Found in a Cottage in Lancashire, and sent up to Lord Oxford.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An upstart knight of late tormented me
Page No:
pp.159-160
Poem Title:
Knight versus Parson; Or a Dialogue between Sir Henry Peachy of Sussex, and Mr. Bramston, a Clergyman of the same County. By the same Mr. Bramston.
Attribution:
Mr. Bramston.
Attributed To:
James Bramston
First Line:
Famous for rhymes
Page No:
p.159
Poem Title:
Alma novem genuit claros Rhedycina poetas. Trapp, Young, Bubb, Stubb, Cobb, Crab, Cary, Tickel, Evans.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sincerest critic of my prose or rhyme
Page No:
pp.161-164
Poem Title:
An Epistle to Lord Cobham. By Mr. Congreve. Being one of the last Copies of Verses he wrote before his Death.
Attribution:
Mr. Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Why will Delia thus retire
Page No:
pp.164-165
Poem Title:
By Lady Mary Wortley Montague, To Lady Irwin.
Attribution:
Lady Mary Wortley Montague
Attributed To:
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu [nee Pierrepont]
First Line:
Though Delia oft retires
Page No:
p.166
Poem Title:
The Answer. By Lady Irwin.
Attribution:
Lady Irwin.
Attributed To:
Anne Ingram [nee Howard; other married name Douglas]
First Line:
Hail happy bride for thou art truly blessed
Page No:
p.167
Poem Title:
An Elegy on Mrs. Bowes. By Lady M. W. Montague.
Attribution:
Lady M. W. Montague.
Attributed To:
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu [nee Pierrepont]
First Line:
Chloe her thoughts has so expressed
Page No:
p.168
Poem Title:
On Lady Mary Wortley Montague's Verses on the Death of Mrs. Bowes.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though every one knows
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
The Answer to Lady Mary's Verses on Mrs. Bowes.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As Chloris on her downy pillow lay
Page No:
pp.169-171
Poem Title:
On a Lady mistaking a Dying Trader for a Dying Lover. By Lady Mary Wortley Montague, on Mrs. Lowther, Lord Lonsdall's Sister.
Attribution:
Lady Mary Wortley Montague
Attributed To:
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu [nee Pierrepont]
First Line:
Now ponder well ye ladies fair
Page No:
pp.172-178
Poem Title:
Virtue in Danger. A lamentable Story, how a virtuous Lady had like to have been ravished by her Sister's Footman. To the Tune of the Children in the Wood. By Lady M. W. Montague.
Attribution:
Lady M. W. Montague.
Attributed To:
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu [nee Pierrepont]
First Line:
Read lovely nymph and tremble not to read
Page No:
pp.178-183
Poem Title:
Epistle from Arthur Grey, the Footman, after his Condemnation for attempting a Rape. By the Right Honourable Lady Mary Wortley Montague.
Attribution:
the Right Honourable Lady Mary Wortley Montague.
Attributed To:
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu [nee Pierrepont]
First Line:
The nurse all wild with transport seemed to swim
Page No:
pp.189-191
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Mr. Pitt, the Translator of Virgil
Attributed To:
Christopher Pitt
First Line:
Though sprightly Sappho force our love and praise
Page No:
p.198
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
What are the falling rills the pendent shades
Page No:
pp.201-202
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Oh be thou blessed with all that heaven can send
Page No:
p.208
Poem Title:
To a Lady, on her Birth-Day, 1723.
Attribution:
A. Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
In Tempe's shades the living lyre was strung
Page No:
p.229
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed