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Old ballads, historical and narrative, with some of modern date ... volume the second. [T146587] [ECCO]

DMI number:
1317
Publication Date:
1777
Volume Number:
2 of 2
ESTC number:
T146587
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW111494220
Shelfmark:
ECCO - nearest hard copy in Bodleian Library
Full Title:
EVANS's EDITION. | [rule] | OLD BALLADS, | HISTORICAL AND NARRATIVE, | WITH SOME OF MODERN DATE; | Now first collected, and reprinted from rare Copies. | WITH NOTES. | VOLUME THE SECOND. | [engraving, including epigraph] | Printed for T. EVANS, in the Strand. | M DCC LXXVII.
Epigraph:
[Engraved:] With rough Majestic Force he mov'd the Heart, | And Strength & Nature made Amends for Art. | Rowe. [unidentified]
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Octavo
Bibliographic details:
Cancel title page: 'OLD BALLADS, | HISTORICAL AND NARRATIVE, | WITH SOME OF MODERN DATE. | NONE OF WHICH ARE INSERTED IN | DR. PERCY's COLLECTION.'
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: contents [A1r-A2r]
Related Miscellanies
Title:
Old ballads, historical and narrative, with some of modern date [T146587] [ECCO]
Publication Date:
1777
ESTC No:
T146587
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
The feathered songster Chaunticleer
Page No:
pp.1-17
Poem Title:
I. The Execution of Sir Charles Bawdin.
Attribution:
Thomas Rowlie, a priest in the 15th century
Attributed To:
Thomas Rowlie
First Line:
When God had taken away true wisdom's king
Page No:
pp.18-22
Poem Title:
II. The most cruel murther of Edward V, and his brother the duke of York, in the Tower, by their uncle the duke of Glocester.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A tale of grief I must unfold
Page No:
pp.22-26
Poem Title:
III. The life and death of the great Duke of Buckingham, who came to an untimely end, for consenting to the deposing of the two gallant young princes, king Edward the fourth's children.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In England once there reigned a king
Page No:
pp.27-31
Poem Title:
IV. A song of the life and death of king Richard III, who, after many murthers by him committed upon the principles nd nobles of this land, was slain at the battle of Bosworth, ni Leicestershire, by Henry VII. king of England.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When York and Lancaster made war
Page No:
pp.32-40
Poem Title:
V. The Union of the Red Rose and the White, by a marriage between king Henry VII. and a daughter of Edward IV.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Peruse the stories of this land
Page No:
pp.41-48
Poem Title:
VI. The story of Ill May-day, in the time of king Henry VIII. and why it was so called; and how queen Catherine begged the lives of two thousand London apprentices.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Eighth Henry ruling in this land
Page No:
pp.48-53
Poem Title:
VII. A song of an English knight, that married the royal princess, lady Mary, sister to king Henry VIII. which knight was afterward made duke of Suffolk.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When as King Henry ruled this land
Page No:
pp.54-57
Poem Title:
VIII. The doleful death of queen Jane, wife to king Henry VIII. and the manner of prince Edward's being cut out of her womb.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When England's fame did ring
Page No:
pp.58-64
Poem Title:
IX. A princely song of the six queens that were married to Henry VIII. king of England.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Is there ever a man in all Scotland
Page No:
pp.64-69
Poem Title:
X. Johnny Armstrong's last good-night, shewing how John Armstrong with his eight-score men fought a bloody battle with the Scotch king, at Edenborough.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As it fell out one Whitsunday
Page No:
pp.70-77
Poem Title:
X. A pleasant ballad shewing how two valiant knights, sir John Armstrong, and sir Michael Musgrave fell in love with the beautiful daughter of the lady Dacres in the North; and of the great strife that happened between them for her, and how they wrought the death of one hundred men.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When as King Edward left this life
Page No:
pp.77-80
Poem Title:
XI. A lamentable ditty on the death of lord Guildford Dudley and lady Jane Grey, that, for their parents ambition in seeking to make these two young princes king and queen of England, were both beheaded in the Tower of London.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Will you hear how once repining
Page No:
pp.81-83
Poem Title:
XII. The princess Elizabeth: A ballad alluding to a story recorded of her when she was prisoner at Woodstock, 1554.
Attribution:
Written by the late William Shenstone, Esq.
Attributed To:
William Shenstone
First Line:
Mary doth complain
Page No:
pp.83-88
Poem Title:
XIII. The lamentable complaint of queen Mary for the unkind departure of king Philip, in whose absence she fell sick and died.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Mourn ye highlands and mourn ye lowlands
Page No:
pp.88-91
Poem Title:
XIV. The battle of Coriche on the Hill of Fair, fought Oct. 28, 1562.
Attribution:
Forbes, a schoolmaster
Attributed To:
Mr. Forbes
First Line:
When God had taken for our sin
Page No:
pp.92-98
Poem Title:
XV. The most rare and excellent history of the dutchess of Suffolk's calamity.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I sing a noble princess
Page No:
pp.99-103
Poem Title:
XVI. A joyful song of the deserved praises of good queen Elizabeth, how princely she behaved herself at Tilbury camp in Essex, in 1588, when the Spaniards threatened the invasion of this kingdom.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In the west of England
Page No:
pp.103-109
Poem Title:
XVII. The life and death of the famous Thomas Stukely, an English gallant, in the time of queen Elizabeth, who ended his life in a battle of three kings of Barbary.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Come sound up your trumpets and beat up your drums
Page No:
pp.110-113
Poem Title:
XVIII. Queen Elizabeth's champion: or, a victory obtain'd by the young earl of Essex, over the old emperor of Germany, by sea; in which he took the emperor's son, and brought him prisoner to queen Elizabeth.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sweet England's prize is gone
Page No:
pp.114-122
Poem Title:
XIX. A lamentable ditty on the death of Robert Devereux, earl of Essex, who was beheaded in the Tower of London, on Ash-Wednesday, 1600-1.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
All you that cry o hone o hone
Page No:
pp.123-127
Poem Title:
XX. A lamentable ballad on the earl of Essex's death.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In England reigned once a king
Page No:
pp.127-133
Poem Title:
XXI. The life and death of queen Elizabeth.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of a worthy London prentice
Page No:
pp.134-140
Poem Title:
XXII. The honour of a London 'prentice. Being an account of his matchless manhood and brave adventures done in Turkey, and by what means he married the king's daughter, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As I to Ireland did pass
Page No:
pp.141-145
Poem Title:
XXIII. The true lovers knot unty'd: being the right path whereby to advise princely virgins how to behave themselves, by the example of the renowned princess the lady Arabella, and the second son of the lord Seymour, late earl of Hertford.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In dole and deep distress
Page No:
pp.146-151
Poem Title:
XXIV. A servant's sorrow for the loss of his late royal mistress queen Anne, who deceas'd at Hampton court the 2d of May, 1618.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When as the King of England died
Page No:
pp.151-157
Poem Title:
XXV. An excellent song made of the successors of king Edward IV.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thursday in the morn the ides of May
Page No:
pp.158-159
Poem Title:
XXVI. On the Sea Fight off Cape la Hogue in the year 1692.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hosier with indignant sorrow
Page No:
pp.160-162
Poem Title:
XXVII. Admiral Vernon's answer to Admiral Hosier's Ghost. Written in 1740. By John Price, a land-waiter in the port of Poole.
Attribution:
By John Price
Attributed To:
John Price
First Line:
Over these waves for ever mourning
Page No:
p.160
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Mr. Glover, author of Leonidas.
Attributed To:
Richard Glover
First Line:
In story we're told
Page No:
pp.162-165
Poem Title:
XXVIII. A song, by Paul Whitehead, Esq.
Attribution:
by Paul Whitehead, Esq.
Attributed To:
Paul Whitehead
First Line:
When Britain fought and triumphed over her foe
Page No:
p.162
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ah me vile wretch that ever I was born
Page No:
pp.165-169
Poem Title:
XXIX. The complaint and lamentation of Mistresse Arden of Feversham in Kent, who for the loue of one Mosbie, hired certaine ruffians and villaines most cruelly to murder her husband; with the fatall end of her and her associats.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
He rose and shut the door his man he blames
Page No:
pp.169-174
Poem Title:
The Second Part.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In Warwickshire there stands a down
Page No:
pp.174-180
Poem Title:
XXX. The lamentable song of the lord Wigmore, governour of Warwick-castle, and the fair maid of Dunsmore.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In ancient days when Arthur reigned
Page No:
pp.180-187
Poem Title:
XXXI. Hengist and Mey:
Attribution:
Written by William Julius Mickle, author of Sir Martyn, an excellent imitation of Spencer, a translation of the Lusiad of Camoens, and several other pieces; the merit of which are too well known to require any eulogium.
Attributed To:
William Julius Mickle
First Line:
Of all the scottish northern chiefs
Page No:
pp.188-197
Poem Title:
XXXII. Sir James the Ross,
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis night and on the hill of storms
Page No:
pp.197-201
Poem Title:
XXXIII. Colma.
Attribution:
Ossian
Attributed To:
Ossian
First Line:
On Morven's hills where valour rose
Page No:
pp.202-207
Poem Title:
XXXIV. Nathos and Darthula. By J. Tait.
Attribution:
By J. Tait.
Attributed To:
John Tait
First Line:
Child Waters in his stable stood
Page No:
pp.208-215
Poem Title:
XXXV. Childe Waters.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Earl Walter stroked his milk white steed
Page No:
pp.216-221
Poem Title:
XXXVI. Earl Walter.
Attribution:
by Mrs. Hampden Pye ... from a collection of poems published ... 1771.
Attributed To:
Jael Henrietta Pye [nee Mendez; other married name Campbell]
First Line:
One parting kiss my Ethelende
Page No:
pp.222-226
Poem Title:
XXXVII. Edwin and Ethelinde.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Young Damon was the blithest lad
Page No:
pp.226-230
Poem Title:
XXXVIII. Damon and Chloe. In imitation of Margaret's Ghost.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When all was wrapped in sable night
Page No:
pp.230-236
Poem Title:
XXXIX. Lord George and Lady Dorothy. In imitation of William and Margaret. By a lady of quality.
Attribution:
By a lady of quality.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Far in the windings of a vale
Page No:
pp.237-242
Poem Title:
XL. Edwin and Emma. By Mr. Mallet.
Attribution:
By Mr. Mallet.
Attributed To:
David Mallet
First Line:
Turn gentle hermit of the dale
Page No:
pp.243-249
Poem Title:
XLI. The Hermit. By Dr. Goldsmith.
Attribution:
By Dr. Goldsmith.
Attributed To:
Oliver Goldsmith
First Line:
Outrageous did the loud wind blow
Page No:
pp.250-253
Poem Title:
XLII. Matilda. By Mr. Jerningham.
Attribution:
By Mr. Jerningham.
Attributed To:
Edward Jerningham
First Line:
To yon dark grove Alisia flew
Page No:
pp.253-256
Poem Title:
XLIII. Alisia. By the same.
Attribution:
[Jerningham]
Attributed To:
Edward Jerningham
First Line:
On the banks of that crystalline stream
Page No:
pp.257-261
Poem Title:
XLIV. Allen and Ella.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
For daring feats of rustic sport
Page No:
pp.262-264
Poem Title:
XLV. Colin and Nancy. By T. P. Esq.
Attribution:
By T. P. Esq.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Bright was the morn the landscape gay
Page No:
pp.265-271
Poem Title:
XLVI. William and Fanny. By J. Robertson.
Attribution:
By J. Robertson.
Attributed To:
J Robertson
First Line:
Cursed with a conscious feeling mind
Page No:
pp.271-276
Poem Title:
XLVII. Amintor and Anna. By the same.
Attribution:
[J. Robertson]
Attributed To:
J Robertson
First Line:
From forth the church all blithesome gay
Page No:
pp.277-279
Poem Title:
XLVIII. Damon and Sylvia. By the same.
Attribution:
[J. Robertson]
Attributed To:
J Robertson
First Line:
Once I was a lively lad
Page No:
pp.279-283
Poem Title:
XLIX. The Maid of Aghavore. By the Rev. Mr. Ball.
Attribution:
By the Rev. Mr. Ball.
Attributed To:
Mr. Ball
First Line:
See my son my Offa dies
Page No:
pp.284-287
Poem Title:
L. The Dirge of Offa. By the same.
Attribution:
[Ball]
Attributed To:
Mr. Ball
First Line:
Happy swain wouldst thou be free
Page No:
pp.287-290
Poem Title:
LI. By the same. Kind Advice to the Happy Shepherd.
Attribution:
[Ball]
Attributed To:
Mr. Ball
First Line:
God prosper long from being broke
Page No:
pp.291-296
Poem Title:
LII. The Drinking-Match at Eden-Hall. In Imitation of the famous ballad of Chevy Chace. By Philip duke of Wharton.
Attribution:
By Philip duke of Wharton.
Attributed To:
Philip James Wharton
First Line:
O see you not yon bonny steed
Page No:
pp.296-299
Poem Title:
LIII. The Dowy Den. A lady hearing her lover had fallen in single combat with his rival, calls to her attendant boy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Saw ye the thane of mickle pride
Page No:
pp.299-305
Poem Title:
LIV. Duncan. A Fragment.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye mountains so dreary and dread
Page No:
pp.305-308
Poem Title:
LV. The Fair Penitent.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed