Blacklight

Poems by several hands on several occasions [R22319]

DMI number:
1736
Publication Date:
1685
ESTC number:
R22319
Shelfmark:
EBBO
Full Title:
POEMS | BY | [g]Several Hands[/g] | AND ON | Several OCCASIONS | [rule] | Collected by [i]N. Tate[/i] | [rule] | [ornament] | [double rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed for [i]J. Hindmarsh,[/i] at the [i]Golden Ball,[/i] | over against the [i]Royal Exchange[/i] in | [i]Cornhil,[/i] 1685
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of 17th century verse, Collection of literary verse, Collection including drama, and Collection of translations/imitations
Format:
Octavo
Pagination:
1-445 (pages 22-25 repeated after first page 25; 286 mispaginated as 287; 287 as 286)
Related People
Publisher:
Joseph Hindmarsh
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Editor:
Nahum Tate
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Dedicatee:
Robert Leke
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Epistle dedicatory to The Right honourable Robert Earl of Scarsdale, Baron Deincourt, Lord Lieutenant of Derbishire
Content/Publication
First Line:
What scorn appears in those fair eyes
Page No:
p.255
Poem Title:
'What scorn appears in those fair eyes'
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Charles How
First Line:
Come poetry and with thee bring along
Page No:
pp.1-2
Poem Title:
An Ode written by Mr Abraham Cowley for Her Majesty, Queen to King Charles I
Attribution:
Mr Abraham Cowley
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
Ah happy grove dark and secure retreat
Page No:
pp.3-5
Poem Title:
The Grove
Attribution:
Earl of Roscommon
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Nothing thou elder brother even to shade
Page No:
pp.5-8
Poem Title:
Upon Nothing
Attribution:
the Late Earl of Rochester
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
Tis not that I am weary grown
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
Upon his leaving his Mistress
Attribution:
Earl of Rochester
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
All my past life is mine no more
Page No:
p.10
Poem Title:
Love and Life - A song
Attribution:
late Earl of Rochester
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
What means this tumult in my veins
Page No:
p.11-13
Poem Title:
To the late Earl of Rochester upon the Report of His Sickness in Town, being newly recovered by his Lordships Advice in the Country. In allusion to the Ode of Horace
Attribution:
Sir Francis Fane
Attributed To:
Sir Francis Fane
First Line:
Urge me not to be poorly great
Page No:
p.13-16
Poem Title:
To a great Lord inviting him to court, or else to write a History in the Country
Attribution:
late Earl of Rochester
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
Fairest of fair ones swear again
Page No:
p.16-17
Poem Title:
To a perjured mistress
Attribution:
late Earl of Rochester
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
Hale scared Cynthia mutable but chaste
Page No:
p.17-32
Poem Title:
A Mask made at the request of the late Earl of Rochester, for the Tragedy of Valentinian
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
All blots I cannot from my manners wipe
Page No:
pp.33-36
Poem Title:
From Ovid Amorum l.2 el. 4 and Lucretius l.4 That he loves women of all sorts and sizes
Attribution:
By Mr R.-
Attributed To:
Thomas Rymer
First Line:
Add all to man that man's perfection makes
Page No:
p.37-38
Poem Title:
To Dolorissa on her being like my lord Dorset
Attribution:
By Mr R.-
Attributed To:
Thomas Rymer
First Line:
Some say I for Olinda die
Page No:
p.38-39
Poem Title:
In imitation of the song, That I love none
Attribution:
By Olinda
Attributed To:
Olinda
First Line:
Come gentle love tis only thou
Page No:
p.39-44
Poem Title:
The Picture
Attribution:
By Mr. Adams
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thyrsis since we be together laid
Page No:
p.44-48
Poem Title:
A pastoral written at Dublin in May 1683
Attribution:
none
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let's live my Lesbia while we may
Page No:
p.48-49
Poem Title:
Vivamus mea Lesbia &c Catull.
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
No faith no I will not now
Page No:
p.50-51
Poem Title:
Song
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Spare gentle beast ah spare my lovely boy
Page No:
p.51-53
Poem Title:
Parce me Juveni &c. Tibullus
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What horrid crime did gentle sleep displease
Page No:
p.53-54
Poem Title:
A translation out of Statius. To sleep
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Great knowing hero who dares boast
Page No:
p.55-57
Poem Title:
The Atheist
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Beneath a gloomy yew's unhealthy shade
Page No:
p.57-64
Poem Title:
A pastoral reflexion on death. Strephon and Damon
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The Persian bravery I hate
Page No:
p.64
Poem Title:
Horatii Ode 28. Lib. 1. Persicos odi puer apparatus
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whither do ye rush with impious haste
Page No:
p.65-66
Poem Title:
Horatii epode 1 ad populum romanum quo quo scelesti ruitis &c
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Water I could never endure
Page No:
p.67-70
Poem Title:
The Fly
Attribution:
Mr. P. Ayres
Attributed To:
Philip Ayres
First Line:
Wilt thou not cease at my desire
Page No:
p.70-72
Poem Title:
To the Nightingale
Attribution:
Mr P. Ayres
Attributed To:
Philip Ayres
First Line:
Ye winds that in your hasty flight
Page No:
p.73-74
Poem Title:
To the Winds
Attribution:
Mr P. Ayres
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Upon a bough hung trembling over a spring
Page No:
p.75-76
Poem Title:
On a Nightingale that was drowned
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whoever a Lover is of art
Page No:
p.76-79
Poem Title:
Love's New Philosophy
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Philip Ayres
First Line:
Oh how does my dear Eschines oh how
Page No:
p.80-85
Poem Title:
Cynisca or the fourth idyllium of Theocritus imitated
Attribution:
W. Bowles, Fellow of Kings Coll. Cambr.
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
The gods are not more blest than he
Page No:
p.85-86
Poem Title:
Sapho's Ode out of Longinus
Attribution:
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
Lyce the gods have heard my prayer
Page No:
p.87-89
Poem Title:
Ode 13 of the fourth book of Horace
Attribution:
No attribution
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Envy how darst thou say that I in vain
Page No:
p.90-93
Poem Title:
The immortality of poesie ... To envy Ovid. Amor. lib. 1. Eleg. 15
Attribution:
Mr Evelyn
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
Dear friend till now I never knew
Page No:
p.95-99
Poem Title:
To Mr. &c
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
Lidia I conjure you say
Page No:
p.99-100
Poem Title:
Out of Horace Ode.8. l.1 Lidia dic per omnes
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
On Hebrus bank as Orpheus sate
Page No:
p.100-101
Poem Title:
The Punishment
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
The princes sat whom martial throngs inclosed
Page No:
p.101-102
Poem Title:
Part of Ajax's speech Ovid Metam. l.13
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
Neptune saw Venice on the Adria stand
Page No:
pp.102-3
Poem Title:
Out of Sannazar
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
Would you be quite cured of love
Page No:
pp.103-7
Poem Title:
Remedy of Love
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
Fair virtue should I follow thee
Page No:
p.108-110
Poem Title:
To Mr. S. G
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
Tell me Damon lovely swain
Page No:
p.111-114
Poem Title:
A gentleman going to his country farm which he had not seen for some time before at the request of a fair lady writes these verses
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
John Evelyn
First Line:
Nay surely men in love have much the start
Page No:
p.115-120
Poem Title:
Whether in love men or women have the advantage, they in making or these in receiving their court; considered in a dialogue between Corinna and Lais
Attribution:
Written by Mr. C. M.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Gods this is great these these are they
Page No:
p.120-121
Poem Title:
On the Lords rejecting the Bill of Exclusion November the 15th 1680
Attribution:
None
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
And is he dead is he already dead
Page No:
p.122-124
Poem Title:
Elegy
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tell me some antiquary who has heard
Page No:
p.124-126
Poem Title:
On the romantick office of credit proposed by Dr. C. and his partners An. Dom. 1682
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When on his banks majestic Pan he espied
Page No:
p.126-127
Poem Title:
Occasioned by a sight of his majesty walking near the river in the time of the Oxford parliament
Attribution:
No attribution
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Caelia tho your conquering eyes
Page No:
Poem Title:
Caelia
Attribution:
No attribution
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Henceforth brave souls you who would fain repair
Page No:
p.129-131
Poem Title:
To a gentleman his friend who could decipher any character To a gentleman his friend who could decipher any character
Attribution:
No attribution
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Business awake it poisons all my joys
Page No:
p.131-134
Poem Title:
Business
Attribution:
No attribution
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Then heaven has heard my prayers at last
Page No:
p.135-137
Poem Title:
Then heaven has heard my prayers at last
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When his murmurs first did reach my ear
Page No:
p.137-138
Poem Title:
ON a fair lady singing
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When long I'd been with dreadful ills oppressed
Page No:
p.138-139
Poem Title:
The recantation not accepted
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let's live my Lesbia whilst we may
Page No:
p.140
Poem Title:
Let's live my Lesbia whilst we may
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Catullus
First Line:
Forgive me heaven if I now accuse
Page No:
p.141-142
Poem Title:
On Caelia's Sickness
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The godlike she shall still possess
Page No:
p.142-143
Poem Title:
A Song
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis but a little space we have
Page No:
p.143-145
Poem Title:
Life
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I see my error plainly now for I
Page No:
p.145
Poem Title:
To a much-admired lady
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When your transcendent worth I would commend
Page No:
p.146-147
Poem Title:
To a very accomplished lady
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain you keep your sorrow fresh with tears
Page No:
p.148-149
Poem Title:
To the same immoderately mourning the death of a relation
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Farewell fond pleasures I disdain
Page No:
p.149-150
Poem Title:
Secret Grief
Attribution:
Not Attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The muses and the muse inspired crew
Page No:
p.151-157
Poem Title:
The Graces or Hieron Theocriti Idyll. 16.
Attribution:
Translated by Sir Edward Sherborn
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I like the youth that does improve
Page No:
Poem Title:
AGE
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tho in pale whites my face appear
Page No:
Poem Title:
Age
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Fill up the glass when I drink deep
Page No:
p.160
Poem Title:
Drinking
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To sing of Mars and his heroic trains
Page No:
p.161-163
Poem Title:
The First elegy of Ovid's amorum translated into English The First elegy of Ovid's amorum translated into English
Attribution:
By Mr Ballow Fellow of King's Colledge Cambridge
Attributed To:
Henry Ballow
First Line:
What's this that thus of sleep bereaves my night
Page No:
p.164-166
Poem Title:
Elegy II
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Henry Ballow
First Line:
Great goddess Venus hearken to a prayer
Page No:
p.167-168
Poem Title:
Elegy III
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Henry Ballow
First Line:
Your husband too with us is bid a guest
Page No:
p.169-172
Poem Title:
Elegy 4
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Henry Ballow
First Line:
One day in summer about twelve at noon
Page No:
p.173-174
Poem Title:
Elegy V.
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Henry Ballow
First Line:
When first of arms and bloody wars I writ
Page No:
p.175-177
Poem Title:
Libri primi .amor. elegia prima
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What can this mean what makes my
Page No:
p.178-181
Poem Title:
Libri primi elegia secunda
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I ask no more than that the fair I love
Page No:
p.182-183
Poem Title:
Libri primi elegia tertia
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When dearest friend oh when shall I be blest
Page No:
p.186-189
Poem Title:
To Mr R. D. at Cambridge
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The melting lute is on the willows hung
Page No:
p.190-192
Poem Title:
The Soldier.
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tune tune my strings divine harmonious love
Page No:
p.193-213
Poem Title:
Philander and Eirene
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poets we praise when in their verse we find
Page No:
p.214-221
Poem Title:
Of divine poesie two cantos
Attribution:
By Mr. Waller
Attributed To:
Edmund Waller
First Line:
Now I shall live indeed not by my skill
Page No:
p.222-225
Poem Title:
Answer to Mr. Waller
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Here since it must be so take thy last look
Page No:
p.226-227
Poem Title:
The change.
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Beauty my dear has such subduing charms
Page No:
p.228-236
Poem Title:
Excusing himself to his mistris for being jealous
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Enough enough ye gods I need no more
Page No:
p.237-238
Poem Title:
Content
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
No flatter not nor me more constant call
Page No:
p.239-243
Poem Title:
The inconstant
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
So the loud tyrant of the winds does sweep
Page No:
p.244-245
Poem Title:
To Lucinda fanning her self
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Be gone fond love I'll dote no more
Page No:
pp.246-247
Poem Title:
The resolve
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hold thy sweet voice while that commands my stay
Page No:
p.248-251
Poem Title:
Hold thy sweet voice while that commands my stay
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Welcome dear heart oh welcome to my arms
Page No:
p.252-253
Poem Title:
'Welcome dear heart oh welcome to my arms'
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
We wish for happiness in vain
Page No:
p.254
Poem Title:
'We wish for happiness in vain'
Attribution:
By Charles How Esq.
Attributed To:
Charles How
First Line:
Soft sounds and gently raised lest some harsh sound
Page No:
p.256-257
Poem Title:
Soft sounds and gently raised lest some harsh sound
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Charles How
First Line:
Whilst you are listening to the shrill alarms
Page No:
p.258-259
Poem Title:
'Whilst you are listening to the shrill alarms'
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When arts were but in embryo yet unknown
Page No:
p.260-262
Poem Title:
'When arts were but in embryo yet unknown '
Attribution:
By Mr. Johnson
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Good heavens what shall I do
Page No:
Poem Title:
Good heavens what shall I do
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Nay my Lucinda give not over
Page No:
p.264-265
Poem Title:
Kissing his mistris
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What shall I do to learn some powerful art
Page No:
p.266-268
Poem Title:
Despair
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ah cruel nymph how canst thou punish me
Page No:
p.269-270
Poem Title:
To Lucinda
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now I can scorn the splendour of a crown
Page No:
p.271-272
Poem Title:
Embracing his mistris
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
No dearest I never fear I'll always be
Page No:
p.273-274
Poem Title:
The unalterable
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Pardon thou brightest star throughout our skies
Page No:
p.275-282
Poem Title:
To Corinna excusing himself for not loving her
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Go on fair maid persist in your disdain
Page No:
p.283
Poem Title:
To Lucinda
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What shall I do to give my soul some rest
Page No:
pp.284-285
Poem Title:
The Captive
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tell me no more of soft harmonious spheres
Page No:
p.286-288
Poem Title:
On Lucinda's singing at church
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
No no bold heart forebear rather than speak
Page No:
p.287
Poem Title:
The Command
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When first I saw Lucinda's face
Page No:
Poem Title:
The Convert
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Who that ere fortune's traitorous smiles has try'ed
Page No:
pp.290-291
Poem Title:
Vicissitude
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As they whom ranging fevers burn
Page No:
p.292
Poem Title:
The cure worse than the disease.
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hold hold my dear destroyer hold
Page No:
p.293
Poem Title:
The Denial
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Joyn thy life breathing lips to mine
Page No:
pp.294-323
Poem Title:
The Royal Canticle or the Song of Solomon
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hector tho warned by an approaching cry
Page No:
pp.324-330
Poem Title:
The last parting of Hector with Andromache and his son Astyanax, when he went to assault the Grecians in their camp; in the end of which expedition he was slain by Achilles
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When greatness from its throne and state
Page No:
pp.331-332
Poem Title:
To the late King at Kings Colledge
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tired that the insolence of love
Page No:
p.333-334
Poem Title:
Cupid armed A-la-modern
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What strains at sacred Pisa's spring
Page No:
p.335-346
Poem Title:
An Ode in imitation of Pindar on the death of the Right Honourable Thomas Earl of Ossory
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh could my labouring Muse a verse impart
Page No:
pp.346-347
Poem Title:
The Piscatory Eclogues of Sanazarius
Attribution:
By Mr. Tate Iscrib'd to Dr. Conquest
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
As late without the help of sail or oar
Page No:
p.347-354
Poem Title:
Lycidas and Micon
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
On the remotest angle of a rock
Page No:
pp.354-359
Poem Title:
The Second Eclogue, Lycon
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
For seven continued days the winds were high
Page No:
pp.359-365
Poem Title:
The third eclogue, Celadon Mopsus
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Now with bolder sails I tempt the main
Page No:
p.366-372
Poem Title:
Proteus Eclogue the fourth
Attribution:
By W. Bowls Fellow of Kings Coll. Cambridge
Attributed To:
W. Bowls
First Line:
Begin the song your instruments advance
Page No:
p.373-375
Poem Title:
Ode for an anniversary of musick on St. Cecilia's Day
Attribution:
By Mr. Oldham
Attributed To:
John Oldham
First Line:
How an unusual but strong wind does bear
Page No:
p.376-377
Poem Title:
The twentieth ode of the second book of Horace
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While Neptune in the Adriatic saw
Page No:
pp. 377.-378
Poem Title:
Sanaz. ep. on Venice
Attribution:
By Mr. Charles Hastings
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When Tereus was with conquering lawrels crowned
Page No:
p.378-391
Poem Title:
The Rape of Philomel A Paraphrase of Ovid's Sixth Book
Attribution:
Mr Andrews
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Deep waters silent roul so grief like mine
Page No:
p.392-393
Poem Title:
Elegy on the Earl of Rochester
Attribution:
By Mrs Wh-
Attributed To:
Anne Wharton [nee Lee]
First Line:
Fly swift ye sluggish hours and bring the day
Page No:
p.394-395
Poem Title:
On the Coronation of the High and Mighty Monarch James II
Attribution:
By Mr. Smith.
Attributed To:
Mr. Smith
First Line:
What makes a happy life oh what
Page No:
p.397
Poem Title:
Martial lib. 10. epigr. 47.
Attribution:
Mr Wilson
Attributed To:
Mr. Wilson
First Line:
Soul of the world time's rival music who
Page No:
pp.398-402
Poem Title:
A Pindarique Essay upon Musick
Attribution:
By the Same
Attributed To:
Mr. Wilson
First Line:
I care for neither prince nor state
Page No:
p.403
Poem Title:
Anacreon to Himself
Attribution:
By the Same
Attributed To:
Mr. Wilson
First Line:
Let others sing the Theban wars
Page No:
p.404
Poem Title:
Another
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Mr. Wilson
First Line:
Past his meridian was the sun each beam
Page No:
p.405-408
Poem Title:
Strada's Nightinglae
Attribution:
By the Same
Attributed To:
Mr. Wilson
First Line:
Less are the griefs we undergo
Page No:
p.409-411
Poem Title:
A translation of the fourth chorus in Seneca's Troas
Attribution:
By J. T
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let others sing of Mars and of his train
Page No:
p.411-412
Poem Title:
Lyricks. To Love.
Attribution:
By Ph. Ayres Esq.
Attributed To:
Philip Ayres
First Line:
O love who in my breast's most noble part
Page No:
p.412-413
Poem Title:
The Request
Attribution:
By the same
Attributed To:
Philip Ayres
First Line:
There is a tower from the flame's fury free
Page No:
pp.413-418
Poem Title:
Part of the last scene of Seneca's Troas done into English
Attribution:
By J.T
Attributed To:
J.T.
First Line:
Tis fallen the sacred pile is fallen and oh
Page No:
pp.418-445
Poem Title:
On the death of our late drea sovereign, Charles the second, of blessed and immortal memory
Attribution:
Not attributed
Attributed To:
Not attributed