Blacklight

Prologues and epilogues, celebrated for their poetical merit [ecco] [N12159]

DMI number:
1278
Publication Date:
1780
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
N12159
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW110408787
Shelfmark:
ECCO - OX Chch.
Full Title:
[i]PROLOGUES[/i] | AND | [i]EPILOGUES,[/i] | CELEBRATED FOR THEIR POETICAL MERIT. | [double rule] | [epigraph] | [double rule] | [i]OXFORD:[/i] | PRINTED BY W. JACKSON, AND SOLD BY | S. BLADON, PATERNOSTER-ROW, LONDON. | [short rule] | [i]Price 3s.[/i]
Epigraph:
SPEAK THE SPEECH, I PR'YTHEE, AS I PRO-| NOUNCE IT. -- | SHAKESPEARE.
Place of Publication:
Oxford
Format:
Duodecimo
Price:
3 s
Bibliographic details:
Frontispiece
Comments:
Date: no date on title page. ESTC suggests [1780?]
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Contents [6pp.]
Related People
Printer:
William Jackson
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Sold by:
S. Bladon
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
It is not strange to hear a poet say
Page No:
pp.1-3
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Wild Gallant, when first acted.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The wild gallant has quite played out his game
Page No:
pp.3-4
Poem Title:
Epilogue When the Wild Gallant was first acted.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As some raw squire by tender mother bred
Page No:
pp.4-5
Poem Title:
Prologue At the Revival of the Wild Gallant.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all dramatic writing comic wit
Page No:
pp.5-6
Poem Title:
Epilogue On the same occasion.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis much desired you judges of the town
Page No:
pp.7-8
Poem Title:
Prologue. To Dryden's Rival Ladies.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Wake wake Quevira our soft rest must cease
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
Prologue. To the Indian Queen.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You see what shifts we are enforced to try
Page No:
p.9
Poem Title:
Epilogue. To the Indian Queen. Spoken by Montezuma.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Almighty critics whom our indians here
Page No:
p.10
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Indian Emperor.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
To all and singular in this full meeting
Page No:
p.11
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Indian Emperor. Spoken by a Mercury.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
He who writ this not without pains and thought
Page No:
pp.12-13
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Secret Love, or the Maiden Queen.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our poet something doubtful of his fate
Page No:
pp.14-15
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Maiden Queen
Attribution:
By a Person of Honour.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Fools which each man meets in his dish each day
Page No:
p.15
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Sir Martin Marr-All.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As country vicars when the sermon's done
Page No:
p.16
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sir Martin Mar-All.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As when a tree's cut down the secret root
Page No:
pp.16-17
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Tempest.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Gallants by all good signs it does appear
Page No:
p.18
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Tempest.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When first our poet set himself to write
Page No:
pp.18-19
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Mock Astrologer.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
My part being small I have had time today
Page No:
pp.20-21
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Mock Astrologer.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Self love which never rightly understood
Page No:
pp.21-22
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Tyrannick Love.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Hold are you mad you damned confounded dog
Page No:
pp.22-23
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Tyrannick Love. Spoken by Mrs. Ellen Gwynne, when she was to be carried off dead.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
This jest was first of the other house's making
Page No:
pp.23-24
Poem Title:
Prologue To the First Part of Dryden's Conquest of Granada. Spoken by Mrs. Ellen Guyn, in a broad-brimm'd Hat, and Waist-belt.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Success which can no more than beauty last
Page No:
pp.25-26
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the First Part of the Conquest of Granada.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
They who write ill and they who never durst write
Page No:
pp.26-27
Poem Title:
Prologue To the Second Part of the Conquest of Granada.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
They who have best succeeded on the stage
Page No:
pp.27-28
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Second Part of the Conquest of Granada.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Lord how reformed and quiet are we grown
Page No:
pp.28-29
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Marriage A-La-Mode.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thus have my spouse and I informed the nation
Page No:
pp.29-30
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Marriage A-La-Mode.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Prologues like bells to churches toll you in
Page No:
pp.31-32
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Love in a Nunnery.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Some have expected from our bills today
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love In A Nunnery.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As needy gallants in the scrivener's hands
Page No:
pp.33-34
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Amboyna.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A poet once the spartans led to fight
Page No:
pp.34-35
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Amboyna.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our author by experience finds it true
Page No:
pp.35-36
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Aurenge Zebe, or the Great Mogul.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A pretty task and so I told the fool
Page No:
pp.36-37
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Aurenge Zebe, or the Great Mogul.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What flocks of critics hover here today
Page No:
pp.38-39
Poem Title:
Prologue. To Dryden's All for Love, or the World Well Lost.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Poets like disputants when reasons fail
Page No:
pp.39-40
Poem Title:
Epilogue To All for Love, or the World Well Lost.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I beg a boon that ere you all disband
Page No:
pp.40-41
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Dryden's Limberham, or the Kind Keeper. Spoken by Limberham.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
When Athens all the Grecian state did guide
Page No:
pp.41-42
Poem Title:
Prologue To Oedipus
Attribution:
Written by Dryden and Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
John Dryden
First Line:
What Sophocles could undertake alone
Page No:
pp.42-43
Poem Title:
Epilogue to Oedipus
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
See my loved britons see your Shakespeare rise
Page No:
pp.44-45
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Troilus and Cressida. Spoken by Mr. Betterton, representing the Ghost of Shakespeare.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
These cruel critics put me into passion
Page No:
pp.45-46
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Troilus and Cressida.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now luck for us and a kind hearty pit
Page No:
pp.46-47
Poem Title:
Prologue. To Dryden's Spanish Friar.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
There's none I'm sure who is a friend to love
Page No:
pp.48-49
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Spanish Friar.
Attribution:
By a Friend of the Author's.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our play's a parallel the holy league
Page No:
pp.49-50
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden and Lee's Duke of Guise.
Attribution:
Dryden and Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
John Dryden
First Line:
Much time and trouble this poor play has cost
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Duke of Guise.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Full twenty years and more our labouring stage
Page No:
pp.52-53
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Opera of Albion and Albanius.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
After our Aesop's fable shown today
Page No:
pp.54-55
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Opera of Albion and Albanius.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The judge removed though he's no more my lord
Page No:
pp.55-66
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Don Sebastian King of Portugal. Spoken by a Woman.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I quaked at heart for fear the royal fashion
Page No:
pp.57-58
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Don Sebastian King of Portugal. Spoken betwixt Antonio and Morayma.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I'm thinking and it almost makes me mad
Page No:
pp.60-61
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Amphitryon, or the Two Sosias. Spoken by Phaedra.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I think or hope at least the coast is clear
Page No:
pp.61-62
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Cleomenes, the Spartan Hero.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
This day the poet bloodily inclined
Page No:
pp.62-63
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Cleomenes, the Spartan Hero.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sure there's a dearth of wit in this dull town
Page No:
pp.63-65
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Oopera of King Arthur, or the British Worthy.
Attribution:
Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I've had today a dozen billet doux
Page No:
pp.65-66
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the Opera of King Arthur, or the British Worthy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As when some treasurer lays down the stick
Page No:
pp.66-68
Poem Title:
Prologue To Dryden's Love Triumphant, or, Nature will prevail
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now in good manners nothing should be said
Page No:
pp.68-69
Poem Title:
Epilogue. To Love Triumphant, or, Nature will Prevail.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poets your subjects have their parts assigned
Page No:
pp.69-70
Poem Title:
Prologue Spoken before the University of Oxford, in 1674.
Attribution:
Written by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A plain built house after so long a stay
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
Prologue Spoken at the opening of the New House in March, 1674.
Attribution:
Written by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Though what our prologue said was sadly true
Page No:
pp.73-74
Poem Title:
Epilogue On the same Occasion.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Were you but half so wise as you are severe
Page No:
pp.74-75
Poem Title:
Prologue...to Dr. Davenant's Circe.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As Jupiter I made my court in vain
Page No:
pp.75-76
Poem Title:
Epilogue...Intended to have been spoken by the Lady Henr. Mar. Wentworth, when Calisto was acted at court.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Most modern wits such monstrous fools have shown
Page No:
pp.76-77
Poem Title:
Epilogue...To Sir G. Etherege's Man of Mode, 1676.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
You've seen a pair of faithful lovers die
Page No:
pp.77-78
Poem Title:
Epilogue...to Mr. N. Lee's Mithridates King of Pontus. 1678.
Attribution:
By Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The unhappy man who once has trailed a pen
Page No:
pp.78-79
Poem Title:
Prologue...To Mr. N. Lee's Caesar Borgia. 1680.
Attribution:
By Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thespis the first professor of our art
Page No:
p.80
Poem Title:
Prologue...To Sophonisba, performed at Oxford, 1680.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The famed Italian muse whose rhymes advance
Page No:
p.81
Poem Title:
Prologue...to the University of Oxford, 1681.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
In those cold regions which no summers cheer
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
Prologue to his Royal Highness, Upon his first appearance at the Duke's Theatre, after his Return from Scotland, 1682.
Attribution:
By Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
When first the ark was landed on the shore
Page No:
pp.83-84
Poem Title:
Prologue...To Mr. J. Banks's Earl of Essex, 1682. Spoken to the King and Queen at their coming to the House.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Poets like lawful monarchs ruled the stage
Page No:
pp.85-86
Poem Title:
Prologue...to Mr. Southerne's Loyal Brothers; or, The Persian Prince. 1682.
Attribution:
By Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A virgin poet was served up today
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
Epilogue...to the same.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Our hero's happy in the play's conclusion
Page No:
pp.88-89
Poem Title:
Epilogue...To Mr. N. Lee's Constantine the Great. 1684.
Attribution:
By Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
How comes it gentlemen that nowadays
Page No:
pp.90-92
Poem Title:
Prologue...To Mr. Southerne's Disappointment; or, the Mother in Fashion. 1684. spoken by Mr. Betterton.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Since faction ebbs and rogues grow out of fashion
Page No:
pp.92-93
Poem Title:
Prologue...To the King and Queen, upon the union of the two Companies in 1686.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
New ministers when first they get in place
Page No:
pp.94-95
Poem Title:
Epilogue...on the same occasion
Attribution:
By Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Ladies I hope there's none behind to hear
Page No:
pp.95-96
Poem Title:
Prologue...to Mr. N. Lee's Princess of Cleves. 1689.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A qualm of conscience brings me back again
Page No:
pp.97-98
Poem Title:
Epilogue...to the same
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Heaven save ye gallants and this hopeful age
Page No:
pp.98-99
Poem Title:
Prologue...to Mrs. Behn's Widow Ranter. 1690.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thus you the sad catastrophe have seen
Page No:
pp.99-100
Poem Title:
Epilogue....to Mr. Mountfort's Henry II. 1693. Spoken by Mrs Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
If there be yet a few that take delight
Page No:
pp.100-101
Poem Title:
Prologue
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Ladies the beardless author of this day
Page No:
pp.101-102
Poem Title:
Epilogue...to Mr. Saunders's Tamerlane.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
You saw our wife was chaste yet thoroughly tried
Page No:
pp.102-103
Poem Title:
Epilogue
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
What Nostradame with all his art can guess
Page No:
pp.104-105
Poem Title:
Prologue...To Beaumont and Fletcher's Prophetess. Revived by Mr. Dryden. Spoken by Mr. Betterton.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
What Greece when learning flourished only knew
Page No:
pp.106-107
Poem Title:
Prologue...To the University of Oxford. Spoken by Mr. Hart, at the acting of the Silent Woman.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
No poor Dutch peasant winged with all his fear
Page No:
pp.107-108
Poem Title:
Prologue...spoken by the same.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Oft has our poet wished this happy seat
Page No:
pp.109-110
Poem Title:
Epilogue...Spoken at Oxford by Mrs. Marshall.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Discord and plots which have undone our age
Page No:
pp.110-111
Poem Title:
Prologue...To the University of Oxford.
Attribution:
By Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Though actors cannot much of learning boast
Page No:
pp.111-112
Poem Title:
Prologue...To the University of Oxford
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
To say this comedy pleased long ago
Page No:
pp.112-114
Poem Title:
Prologue...to Albumazar.
Attribution:
by Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
With sickly actors and an old house too
Page No:
pp.114-115
Poem Title:
Prologue...Spoken at the Revival of Arvigarus and Philicia, written by Lodowick Carell, Esq.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
So shipwrecked passengers escape to land
Page No:
pp.115-116
Poem Title:
Prologue...Spoken the first Day of the King's House acting after the Fire.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Were none of you gallants ever driven so hard
Page No:
pp.116-117
Poem Title:
Epilogue...for the King's House.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
We act by fits and starts like drowning men
Page No:
pp.117-118
Poem Title:
Epilogue...For the King's House.
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Gallants a bashful poet bids me say
Page No:
pp.118-119
Poem Title:
Prologue
Attribution:
by Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Wit long oppressed and filled at last with rage
Page No:
pp.120-121
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. N. Lee's Theodosius; or, the Force of Love.
Attribution:
Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Thrice happy they that never writ before
Page No:
pp.121-122
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Long has the tribe of poets on the stage
Page No:
pp.123-124
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. N. Lee's Lucius Junius Brutus.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
No cringing sirs the poet's champion I
Page No:
pp.124-125
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Not careful leaders when the trumpets call
Page No:
pp.126-127
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. N. Lee's Mithridates, King of Pontus.
Attribution:
Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Well then be you his judges what pretence
Page No:
pp.127-128
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Mr. N. Lee's Caesar Borgia.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
What think ye meant wise providence when first
Page No:
pp.128-129
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. N. Lee's Constantine the Great.
Attribution:
Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
To this learned audience gladly we submit
Page No:
pp.130-131
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Mr. Lee's Sophonisba, spoken at Oxford.
Attribution:
Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Good plays and perfect sense as scarce are grow
Page No:
pp.131-132
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. N. Lee's Nero, Emperor of Rome.
Attribution:
Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
How dull how grave and how precise ye fit
Page No:
p.132
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
He whose attempt is shown this night to please
Page No:
pp.133-134
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Lee's Gloriana; or, the Court of Aug. Caesar.
Attribution:
Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
You servants gentleman tis a long time
Page No:
pp.134-136
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How hard the fate is of the scribbling drudge
Page No:
pp.136-137
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Lee's Rival Queens; or the Death of Alexander the Great.
Attribution:
Written by Sir Car Scroop, Bart.
Attributed To:
Sir Carr Scrope
First Line:
Whatever they mean yet ought they to be cursed
Page No:
pp.137-139
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
This day we show you the most bloody rage
Page No:
pp.139-140
Poem Title:
Prologue...To Mr N. Lee's Massacre of Paris.
Attribution:
by Mr. Mountfort
Attributed To:
William Mountfort
First Line:
How wise they are that can with patience bear
Page No:
pp.140-141
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same
Attribution:
by Mr. Powell.
Attributed To:
George Powell
First Line:
Who could expect such crowding here today
Page No:
pp.142-143
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir G. Etherege's Comical Revenge; or, Love in a Tub.
Attribution:
Sir G. Etherege
Attributed To:
Sir George Etherege
First Line:
Sir Frederick now I am revenged on you
Page No:
p.143
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Like dancers on the ropes poor poets fare
Page No:
pp.144-145
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir G. Etherege's Man of Mode.
Attribution:
Written by Sir Car Scroope, Baronet.
Attributed To:
Sir Carr Scrope
First Line:
The ladies have a lonely summer passed
Page No:
pp.145-146
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Southerne's Anthony Love; or, the Rambling Lady.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
If novelty has any charms to move
Page No:
pp.146-147
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Gallants you're welcome to our homely cheer
Page No:
pp.148-149
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Southerne's Wives Excuse; or Cuckolds make Themselves.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
My character not being much in vogue
Page No:
pp.149-150
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. In the Character of Mrs. Friendall.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
They who must write for writing's a disease
Page No:
pp.150-151
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Southerne's Maid's Lady Prayer.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
See the effects of a poor maid's last prayer
Page No:
p.152
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When once a poet settles an ill name
Page No:
p.153
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Southerne's Fatal Marriage.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Now tell me when you saw the lady die
Page No:
p.154
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As when in hostile times two neighbouring states
Page No:
pp.155-156
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Southerne's Oroonoko; or, The Royal Slave.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
You see we try all shapes and shifts and arts
Page No:
pp.156-157
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
By Mr. Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Our bard resolved to quit this wicked town
Page No:
pp.157-159
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. T. Southerne's Fate of Capua.
Attribution:
Written by the Honourable Charles Boyle, Esquire.
Attributed To:
Charles Boyle
First Line:
Poets fine titles for themselves may find
Page No:
pp.159-160
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Written by Colonel Codrington
Attributed To:
Christopher Codrington
First Line:
When realms are ravaged with invasive foes
Page No:
pp.160-162
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. T. Southerne's Spartan Dame.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Fenton.
Attributed To:
Elijah Fenton
First Line:
Our author's muse a numerous issue boasts
Page No:
pp.162-163
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Written by Major Richardson Pack.
Attributed To:
Richardson Pack
First Line:
How this vile world is changed in former days
Page No:
pp.163-164
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Congreve's Old Batchelor.
Attribution:
Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
As a rash girl who will all hazards run
Page No:
pp.164-165
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Moors have this way as story tells to know
Page No:
pp.165-166
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Congreve's Double Dealer.
Attribution:
Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Could poets but foresee how plays would take
Page No:
pp.167-168
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The husbandman in vain renews his toil
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Congreve's Love for Love. Spoken At the Opening of the New-House.
Attribution:
Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Sure providence at first designed this place
Page No:
pp.170-171
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The time has been when plays were not so plenty
Page No:
pp.171-172
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Congreve's Mournign Bride.
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
The tragedy thus done I am you know
Page No:
pp.173-174
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of those few fools who with ill stars are cursed
Page No:
pp.174-175
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Congreve's Way of the World.
Attribution:
Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
After our epilogue this crowd dismisses
Page No:
pp.175-176
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
By this repeated act of grace we see
Page No:
pp.176-177
Poem Title:
Prologue...to Queen Mary, Upon her Majesty's coming to see the Old Batchelor, after having seen the Double Dealer.
Attribution:
by Mr. Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Whatever future fate our house may find
Page No:
pp.178-179
Poem Title:
Epilogue At the Opening of the Queen's Theatre in the Haymarket, with an Italian Pastoral.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Our age has much improved the warrior's art
Page No:
pp.179-180
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Hopkins's Pyrrhus King of Epirus.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
The happy muse to this high scene preferred
Page No:
pp.180-181
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Court, On the Queen's Birth-Day, 1704.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
This year has been remarkable two ways
Page No:
pp.181-183
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Dryden junior's Husband His Own Cuckold.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Never did rhymer greater hazard run
Page No:
pp.183-184
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Alcibiades.
Attribution:
Otway
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Now who says poets don't in blood delight
Page No:
pp.184-185
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken in the Character of Deidamia.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Gallants our author met me here today
Page No:
p.185
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Titus and Berenice, with the Cheats of Scapin.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How little do you guess what I'm to say
Page No:
pp.186-187
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by Mrs. Mary Lee, when she was out of humour.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How hard a task hath that poor drudge of stage
Page No:
pp.187-188
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Friendship in Fashion,
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Well sirs if now my spouse and I should part
Page No:
pp.188-189
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When first our author took this play in hand
Page No:
pp.189-190
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Don Carlos.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Now what do ye think my message hither means
Page No:
pp.190-191
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by a little Girl.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To you great judges in this writing age
Page No:
pp.191-192
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Orphan, or the Unhappy Marriage.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You've seen one orphan ruined here and I
Page No:
pp.192-193
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In ages past when will those times renew
Page No:
pp.193-194
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's History and Fall of Caius Marius.
Attribution:
Otway
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
A mischief on it though I'm again alive
Page No:
p.195
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken in the Character of Lavinia.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Forsaken dames with less concern reflect
Page No:
pp.196-197
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Soldier's Fortune.
Attribution:
Written by Lord Falkland.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With the discharge of passions much oppressed
Page No:
pp.197-198
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though plays and prologues never did more abound
Page No:
pp.199-200
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Atheist, or Second Part of the Soldier's Fortune.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
It is not long since in the noisy pit
Page No:
pp.200-201
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Duke of Cambridge.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
In these distracted times when each man dreads
Page No:
pp.202-203
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Otway's Venice Preserved.
Attribution:
Otway
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
The text is done and now for application
Page No:
pp.203-204
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When too much plenty luxury and ease
Page No:
pp.204-206
Poem Title:
Prologue Spoken Upon His Royal Highness the Duke of York coming to the Theatre, Friday, April 21, 1682.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
We might well call this short mock-play of ours
Page No:
p.207
Poem Title:
Prologue To George Villiers Duke of Buckingham's Rehearsal.
Attribution:
George Villiers Duke of Buckingham
Attributed To:
George Villiers
First Line:
Of all men those have reason least to care
Page No:
pp.208-209
Poem Title:
Prologue To George Villiers Duke of Buckingham's Chances.
Attribution:
George Villiers Duke of Buckingham
Attributed To:
George Villiers
First Line:
The play is at an end but where's the plot
Page No:
p.208
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Perhaps you gentlemen expect today
Page No:
pp.209-210
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hope to mend Shakespeare or to match his style
Page No:
pp.210-211
Poem Title:
Prologue To John Sheffield Duke of Buckingham's Alteration of Julius Caesar.
Attribution:
John Sheffield Duke of Buckingham
Attributed To:
John Sheffield
First Line:
Our scene is Athens and great Athens named
Page No:
pp.211-212
Poem Title:
Prologue To John Sheffield Duke of Buckingham's Marcus Brutus.
Attribution:
John Sheffield Duke of Buckingham
Attributed To:
John Sheffield
First Line:
To all impartial judges in the pit
Page No:
pp.213-214
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Banks's Virtue Betrayed, or Anna Bullen.
Attribution:
Written by A Person of Quality.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well sirs your kind opinion now I pray
Page No:
pp.214-215
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The merchant joyful with the hopes of gain
Page No:
pp.215-216
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Banks's Earl of Essex. Spoken by Major Mahon, the first four Days.
Attribution:
Mr. Banks
Attributed To:
John Banks
First Line:
When all that we thought great and good was gone
Page No:
pp.216-217
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Banks's Cyrus The Great. Addressed to her Royal Highness the Princess Anne of Denmark.
Attribution:
Mr. Banks
Attributed To:
John Banks
First Line:
Hold is the play done
Page No:
pp.217-218
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by a Boy and Girl, by way of Dialogue.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Custom which bids the thief from cart harangue
Page No:
pp.219-220
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Wycherley's Love in a Wood.
Attribution:
Mr. Wycherley
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Now my brisk brothers of the pit you'll say
Page No:
pp.220
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by Dapperwit.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our author like us finding twould scarce do
Page No:
p.221
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Wycherley's Gentleman Dancing-Master. Addressed to the City.
Attribution:
Mr. Wycherley
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
The ladies first I am to compliment
Page No:
pp.222-223
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by Flirt.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I the plain dealer am to act today
Page No:
pp.223-225
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Wycherley's Plain Dealer. Spoken by the Plain Dealer.
Attribution:
Mr. Wycherley
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
To you the judges learned in stage laws
Page No:
pp.225-226
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by the Widow Blackacre.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poets like cudgeled bullies never do
Page No:
pp.226-227
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Wycherley's Country Wife.
Attribution:
Mr. Wycherley
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Now you the vigorous who daily here
Page No:
pp.227-228
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To wake the soul by tender strokes of art
Page No:
pp.228-230
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Addison's Cato.
Attribution:
Written by Alexander Pope, Esq;
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
In this grave age when comedies are few
Page No:
pp.231-232
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mr. Addison's Drummer, or the Haunted House.
Attribution:
Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
To night the poet's advocate I stand
Page No:
pp.233-234
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by Mrs. Oldfield, in the Character of Lady Trueman.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Nature deserted and dramatic art
Page No:
pp.234-235
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Richard Steele's Funeral, or Grief A-la-mode.
Attribution:
Sir Richard Steele
Attributed To:
Sir Richard Steele
First Line:
Love hope and fear desire aversion rage
Page No:
pp.235-236
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by Lord Hardy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In the first rise and infancy of farce
Page No:
pp.236-237
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Richard Steele's Tender Husband.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Britons who constant war with factious rage
Page No:
p.238
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
All the commanding powers that awe mankind
Page No:
p.239
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Richard Steele's Lying Lover, or the Ladies Friendship.
Attribution:
Sir Richard Steele
Attributed To:
Sir Richard Steele
First Line:
Our too adventurous author soared tonight
Page No:
pp.239-240
Poem Title:
Epilogue. To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To win your hearts and to secure your praise
Page No:
pp.240-241
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Richard Steele's Conscious Lovers.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Welsten. [sic]
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
Our author whom entreaties cannot move
Page No:
p.242
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Intended to be spoken by Indiana.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Welsted.
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
Ladies this play in too much haste was writ
Page No:
pp.243-244
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir John Vanbrugh's Relapse, or Virtue in Danger.
Attribution:
Sir John Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
Gentlemen and ladies | these people have regaled you here today
Page No:
pp.244-245
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same. Spoken by Lord Foppington.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Gallants we never yet produced a play
Page No:
pp.245-246
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir John Vanbrugh's Aesop.
Attribution:
Sir John Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
Since tis the intent and business of the stage
Page No:
pp.246-247
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir John Vanbrugh's Provok'd Wife.
Attribution:
Sir John Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
No epilogue I swear I know of none
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same...Spoken by Lady Brute and Belinda.
Attribution:
Written by another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You dread reformers of an impious age
Page No:
pp.248-250
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir John Vanbrugh's False Friend.
Attribution:
Sir John Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
What say you sirs do ye think my lady'll scape
Page No:
pp.250-251
Poem Title:
Epilogue. To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye gods what crime had my poor father done
Page No:
p-252
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir John Vanbrugh's Confederacy. Spoken by a shabby Poet.
Attribution:
Sir John Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
I've heard wise men in politics lay down
Page No:
pp.252-253
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our author's wit and raillery tonight
Page No:
pp.253-254
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir John Vanbrugh's Mistake.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Steele
Attributed To:
Sir Richard Steele
First Line:
I'm thinking now good husbands are so few
Page No:
pp.255-256
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Motteux.
Attributed To:
Peter Anthony Motteux
First Line:
How hard's the poet's task in these our days
Page No:
pp.256-257
Poem Title:
Prologue To George Granville Lord Lansdowne's Heroic Love.
Attribution:
Written by the Right Hon. Henry St. John, Esq;
Attributed To:
Henry St John
First Line:
What will the galleries nay boxes say
Page No:
pp.257-258
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Written by Bevill Higgons, Esq;
Attributed To:
Bevil Higgons
First Line:
I who have been the poet's spark to day
Page No:
p.259
Poem Title:
Epilogue To George Granville Lord Lansdowne's Once a Lover; and Always a Lover. Spoken by Angelica.
Attribution:
George Granville Lord Lansdowne
Attributed To:
George Granville
First Line:
This radiant circle reverend Shakespeare view
Page No:
pp.259-261
Poem Title:
Prologue To George Granville Lord Lansdown's Jew of Venice.
Attribution:
Written by Bevill Higgons, Esq;
Attributed To:
Bevil Higgons
First Line:
Each in his turn the poet and the priest
Page No:
pp.261-262
Poem Title:
Epilogue To the same.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When Orpheus tuned his pipe with pleasing woe
Page No:
pp.262-263
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Lord Lansdowne's British Enchanters.
Attribution:
Written by the Right Hon. Joseph Addison's Esq;
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison