Blacklight

Select tales and fables with prudential maxims and other little lessons of morality in prose and verse [T128069] [ecco]

DMI number:
1034
Publication Date:
1756
Volume Number:
1 of 2
ESTC number:
T128069
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW124552663
Shelfmark:
ECCO - BL
Full Title:
SELECT | TALES and FABLES, | WITH | Prudential Maxims, | And other little | LESSONS OF MOTALITY, | IN | PROSE AND VERSE, | Equally Instructive and Entertaining. | For the USE of | BOTH SEXES. | WHEREIN | Their FOIBLES, as well as BEAUTIES, are | presented to their View in the fairest and most | inoffensive Point of Light. | [rule] | The Whole embellished with SIXTY ORIGINAL | DESIGNS, expressive of each Subject, neatly | engraved on COPPER PLATES. | [rule] | By B. COLE, ENGRAVER. | [rule] | [epigraph] | [ornamental rule] | DUBLIN: | Printed by GEORGE FAULKNER, in Essex-street. | M DCC LVI.
Epigraph:
TRUTH [i]under[/i] FICTION [i]we impart | To root out Folly from the Heart[/i].
Place of Publication:
Dublin
Genres:
Collection aimed at children/young people and Collection of fables
Format:
Duodecimo
Bibliographic details:
Frontispiece. Plates accompany each fable. Query: check whether the plates are the same in other editions of this work.
Comments:
Contents: prose p. 12, 16, 18, 24, 28, 34, 36, 56-68, 74-88; alphabetical aids to memory pp. 39-55.
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Dedication 'To his Royal Highness Prince Edward' signed 'Benj. Cole' [1p.]; Preface [2pp].
Related Miscellanies
Title:
Select tales and fables with prudential maxims and other little lessons of morality in prose and verse [N67747] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1746
ESTC No:
N67747
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
Select tales and fables with lessons of morality in verse and prose [ESTC T175731]
Publication Date:
1775
ESTC No:
T175731
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Select tales and fables with prudential maxims and other little lessons of morality in prose and verse [T127913] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1780
ESTC No:
T127913
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
Select tales and fables with prudential maxims in prose and verse [vol II] [T128069] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1756
ESTC No:
T128069
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Related People
Engraver:
Benjamin Cole
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Printer:
George Faulkner
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Dedicatee:
Prince Edward Augustus
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Reader these little pleasant tales
Page No:
[2pp.]
Poem Title:
The Prologue To Phoedrus his Fables, Imitated in Easy Verse. By Way of Introduction.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A mastiff trained to hostile deeds
Page No:
p.9
Poem Title:
Fable I. The Bull and the Mastiff.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An elephant in days of yore
Page No:
p.9
Poem Title:
Fable II. The Elephant and the Bookseller.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As plants whilst tender bend which way you please
Page No:
p.10
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. I. Art improves Nature.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Censure will blame her breath was ever spent
Page No:
p.10
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. II. Merit creates Envy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As once a wolf his thirst allayed
Page No:
p.11
Poem Title:
Fable III. The Wolf and the Lamb.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The fox an actor's vizard found
Page No:
p.11
Poem Title:
Fable IV. The Fox and the Mask.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A spaniel very pert and gay
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
Fable VI. The Spaniel and the Camelion.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A tiger in pursuit of prey
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
Fable V. The Lyon, Tyger, and Traveller.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sir I have lived a courtier all my days
Page No:
p.14
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. VI. The Picture of a Courtier.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When Nero Rome's imperial sceptre swayed
Page No:
p.14
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. V. The Picture of a Tyrant.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A daw in pilfered plumes arrayed
Page No:
p.15
Poem Title:
Fable VII. The Daw and the Peacock.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A dog at hunger's urgent call
Page No:
p.15
Poem Title:
Fable VIII. The Dog and the Shadow.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A monkey with parental care
Page No:
p.17
Poem Title:
Fable X. The Monkey and her Cub.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As once a cock of sordid brood
Page No:
p.17
Poem Title:
Fable IX. The Cock and the Diamond.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A hare beloved by all the train
Page No:
p.19
Poem Title:
Fable XI. The Hare and many Friends.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Long lived a swain in high renown
Page No:
p.19
Poem Title:
Fable XII. The Shepherd and the Philosopher.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How truly blessed are they and only they
Page No:
p.20
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XII. Nature is the best Guide.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Men may respect and love with ease pretend
Page No:
p.20
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XI. Adversity is the Touchstone of Friendship.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
So like the life a painter drew
Page No:
p.21
Poem Title:
Fable XXIV. The Painter who pleased No Body and Every Body.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The miser starts and trembling stares
Page No:
p.21
Poem Title:
Fable XIII. The Miser and Plutus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If mines of wealth in every field were found
Page No:
p.22
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XIII. Covetousness is the Root of all Evil.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Nothing so much intoxicates the brain
Page No:
p.22
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XIV. The Magick of Flattery.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A fox half starved a vineyard spied
Page No:
p.23
Poem Title:
Fable XV. The Fox and the Grapes.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A peasant on his dying bed
Page No:
p.23
Poem Title:
Fable XVI. The Farmer and his Sons.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As at the barn the peacock stands
Page No:
p.25
Poem Title:
Fable XVIII. The Peacock, the Turkey, and Goose.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As Chloe with affected air
Page No:
p.25
Poem Title:
Fable XVII. The Lady and the Wasp.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Her commendations praise you into shame
Page No:
p.26
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XVIII. The Character of a Mischief-Maker.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There's a being in nature as light as a feather
Page No:
p.26
Poem Title:
The Application to the Fab. XVIII. The Picture of a Coquet.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A peacock kept by Juno's side
Page No:
p.27
Poem Title:
Fable XX. Juno and her Peacock.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hob plunged his waggon in a slough
Page No:
p.27
Poem Title:
Fable XIX. The Peasant and Hercules.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Are there no hopes the patient cries
Page No:
p.29
Poem Title:
Fable XXI. The Sick Man and the Angel.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though birds and beasts are proud and vain
Page No:
p.29
Poem Title:
Fable XXI. The Man and the Flea.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Must then applauding crowds repeat your name
Page No:
p.30
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XXI. Pride was not made for Man.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though wealth was poured like a rolling tide
Page No:
p.30
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XXII. Wealth without Content.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As a young rake repentant sat
Page No:
p.31
Poem Title:
Fable XXIV. The Universal Apparition.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As on the ground a persian lay
Page No:
p.31
Poem Title:
Fable XXIII. The Persian, the Sun, and the Cloud.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Envy will merit as its shade persue
Page No:
p.32
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XXIII. Merit will shine in Spite of Opposition.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Is there a sensual thing of any kind
Page No:
p.32
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XXIV. Virtue's Address to Hercules.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As Reynard viewed with longing eyes
Page No:
p.33
Poem Title:
Fable XXVI. The Fox and the Crow.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Two trouts that thoughtless of deceit
Page No:
p.33
Poem Title:
Fable XXV. The Trouts and the Angler.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A fruitful vine like a true friend
Page No:
p.35
Poem Title:
Fable XXVIII. The Hart and the Vine.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A restless crab in the ocean bred
Page No:
p.35
Poem Title:
Fable XXVII. The Crab and the Fox.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Fast to an elm a lamb was tied
Page No:
p.37
Poem Title:
Fable XXX. The Wild Boar and the Ram.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With weeping eyes a nurse surveyed
Page No:
p.37
Poem Title:
Fable XXIX. The Mother, the Nurse, and the Fairy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Exalted Socrates divinely brave
Page No:
p.38
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab XXX. Patience in Distress.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Good god how tender is the parents love
Page No:
p.38
Poem Title:
The Application to Fab. XXIX. Fancy surpasses Beauty.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Attend the advice
Page No:
pp.46-49
Poem Title:
An Alphabet of Prudential Maxims In Easy Verse, Fro the Use of Children.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Art and assiduous care must join
Page No:
pp.50-52
Poem Title:
A Second Alphabet Of Prudential Maxims, In Easy Verse.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
All human things are subject to decay
Page No:
pp.53-55
Poem Title:
A Third Alphabet Of Prudential Maxims In Easy Verse.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
First to the gods thy humble homage pay
Page No:
pp.69-74
Poem Title:
The Golden Verses of Pythagoras.
Attribution:
Translated by the late celebrated Nicholas Rowe, Esq;
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe