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Sam Treacher's dead dear Sam has bid good night

DMI number:
6926
First Line:
Sam Treacher's dead dear Sam has bid good night
Last Line:
For thou shalt make it live because it sings of thee
Poem Genre / Form:
Couplet, Elegy, and Satire
Themes:
Death, Illness, injury, and Medicine
Related People
Author:
Francis Quarles
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'Then you whose eyes would lean to weep, draw near' to 'Lest while you stay you soon dissolve and die' T145151 (pp. 52-53). Extract w. variants from 'Eleg. 1.' Quarles, Poems (1633): 491. From 'But stay (sad genius) how do griefs transport' to 'New matter; as true sorrow needs no muse' T145151 (p. 53). Extract w. variants from 'Eleg. 2.' Quarles, Poems (1633): 491. From 'Farewell those eyes - whose mixt aspect of late' to 'Your vision now, or our sad farewell' T145151 (p. 62). Extract w. variants from 'Eleg. 6.' Quarles, Poems (1633): 493. From 'God and the Doctor Men alike adore' to 'God is forgotten and the doctor slighted'. Variant of 'Of Common Devotion'. Quarles, Fancies (1633): 20.
Author:
James Shirley
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'The treasure of his bosom doth appear' to 'For none can soften his stiff clay again' T145151 (p. 61): extracts with alterations (including reordering) from James Shirley's An Elegie upon the truly Honourable Tho. Viscount Savage ('Is Savage dead? and can the Rock which bears') - LION.
Author:
John Cleveland
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'I need no muse to give my passion vent' to 'Be quavered out by soft division' T145151 (p. 53): extract, with alterations, from Cleveland's On the Archbishop of Canterbury. Morris and Withington (1967): 38-39.
Author:
John Dryden
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
From 'Physic can but mend our crazy state' to 'Patch an old building, not a new create' T145151 (p. 58): Extract from Dryden's Palamon and Arcite. From 'The first physicians by debauch were made' to 'Excess began and sloth sustains the trade' T145151 (p. 58); from 'The wise for cure on exercise depend' to 'God never made his work for man to mend' T145151 (p. 58): extract from Dryden's Epistle the Fifteenth, to my honoured kinsman John Driden ('How blessed is he, who leads a country life') From 'All offices of heaven so well he knew' to 'It were enough to break a single heart' T145151 (pp. 62-63); from 'Let this suffice; nor thou, dear Sam, refuse' to 'From vice but barely by departing hence' T145151 (p. 64); from 'Be what, and where thou art, to wish thy place' to 'For thou shalt make it live, because it sings of thee' T145151 (p. 64): extracts from Dryden's Eleonora: A panegyrical poem dedicated to the memory of the late countess of Abingdon - Calif. VII (2000): 173 & 198-9; Calif. III (1969):
Author:
Robert Gould
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'I own his praise should be by angels sung' to 'I'll sanctify with truth, and polish with my tears' (p. 52); from 'Away! and let me join the weeping throng' to 'And die with his dear name upon my tongue' (p. 53); from 'It shan't be said the dews of lethe steep' to 'Is covered with Sam Treacher in the grave' (p. 53); from 'They long have reigned, and eager of renown' to 'But twas his doctors that alone did kill' (p. 57); from 'So slight at first his ail, it could have done' to 'Hail him ye angels to his long repose' (pp. 59-60); from 'And now an universal burst of woe' to 'O'er Chesham town did like a torrent flow' (p. 60); from 'The very parson mourned Sam Treacher's fate' to 'And from so many mouths oppressed the sky' (p. 60); from 'But his and ev'ry grief the poor's outdid' to 'To think what numbers wept him to the grave' (p. 61); from 'There rest his ashes - for his honest name' to 'Shall fill th'expiring breath, and latest gasp of fame' (p. 62). Extracts from 'The Mourning Swain, a Funeral Eclogue on the much lamented Death of the Right Honourable James Earl of Abingdon'. Gould (1709) I: 375-391. From 'The small-pox is of all death's agents worst' to 'Ev'n that defacing which it cannot kill' (p. 58); 'Thou dost at once what age is doing long' to 'That you the weak to health and strength restore' (p. 58); from 'Vain is your learning, and your art a cheat' to 'The just, the kind, the noble Treacher's gone!' (pp. 58-59); from 'Gone! and out tears should vulgar grief exceed' to 'We should not only weep our loss but bleed' (p. 59); from 'Adieu, thou best of earthly friends, adieu' to 'And for thy death resolve in grief to live' (p. 62). Extracts w. variants from 'A Poem most humbly offer'd to the Memory of her late Sacred Majesty, Queen Mary'. Gould (1709) I: 284-294. Query: attribution?
Author:
W. S.
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'Our entrance and our exit seem to meet' to 'His carcass mould'ring into nature-clay' T145151 (p. 60); from 'See where his friends surround his private urn' to 'A narrow coffin and a scanty grave' T145151 (p. 61): extracts with alterations from W. S's In Praise of the Author of the Mourning-Ring, with the Explanation of the Frontispiece Annext to his Book ('WIth sighs and groans, and plunged Eyes attend') in Dunton's The mourning-ring, in memory of your departed friend (1692) - EEBO.
Content/Publication
Title:
Athenianism: or the new projects of Mr. John Dunton [T145151]
Page No(s):
pp.52-64
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed