Blacklight

When as the sun flings down his richest rays

DMI number:
6880
First Line:
When as the sun flings down his richest rays
Last Line:
And all the rest are shadows unto me
Poem Genre / Form:
Couplet and Extract / snippet from longer work
Themes:
Friendship
Related People
Author:
Abraham Cowley
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
From 'Still to one end we both so justly drew' to 'Till nature's self scarce looked on us as two' T145151 (p. 108): extract with alterations, from Cowley's Davideis, Book I; Waller (1905): 286.
Author:
James Day
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'When as the sun flings down his richest rays' to 'And thou (poor sunless thou) art left alone' T145151 (p. 101); from 'Yet here's my comfort lord if I can see' to 'My self, grant me more with than Aesop's dog' T145151 (p. 102): extracts, with alterations, from James Day's A Meditation on a Mans shadow ('When as the Sunne flings downe his richest rayes') LION.
Author:
John Dryden
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
From 'Fixed to his friend, inviolably true' to 'Though bodies cannot, souls can penetrate' T145151 (p. 106): extracts from Dryden's Eleonora, a panegyrical poem dedicated to the memory of the late countess of Abingdon. Calif. III (1969): 242.
Author:
John Dunton
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
Is Dunton responsible for combining and reworking the fragments?
Author:
Nahum Tate
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
'My esteem for thee / Was equal to thy worth and love for me' T145151 (p. 107): extract from Tate's In memory of the Author ('Take this short-summon'd loose unfinisht Verse'). The Works of Mr. John Oldham, together with his remains (1684, ESTC R199).
Author:
Robert Gould
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'Then only proud when he could serve a friend' to 'But his concern was always for your good' (pp. 105-106). Extract w. variants from 'The Mourning Swain, a Funeral Eclogue on the much lamented Death of the Right Honourable James Earl of Abingdon'. Gould (1709) I: 375-391. Query: attribution?
Author:
Thomas D'Urfey
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
From 'Then view the chances of inconstant fate' to 'And the vices of your body damn your soul' T145151 (p. 105). Extract w. variants from 'The Progress of Honesty' (1681, ESTC R3727).
Content/Publication
Title:
Athenianism: or the new projects of Mr. John Dunton [T145151]
Page No(s):
pp.101-110
Poem Title:
Dunton's Shadow: Or the Character of a Summer Friend
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed