Blacklight

A collection and selection of english prologues and epilogues [vol 1] [T145232] [ecco]

DMI number:
1420
Publication Date:
1779
Volume Number:
1 of 4
ESTC number:
T145232
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW113372687
Shelfmark:
ECCO - Bod
Full Title:
A | COLLECTION AND SELECTION | OF | ENGLISH | PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES. | COMMENCING WITH | [i]SHAKESPEARE[/i], | AND CONCLUDING WITH | [i]GARRICK.[/i] | IN FOUR VOLUMES. | VOLUME I. | [epigraph] | [short rule] | LONDON: | PRINTED FOR | FIELDING AND WALKER, PATERNOSTER-ROW. | MDCCLXXIX.
Epigraph:
'Tis much desir'd, you judges of the town, | Would pass a vote to put all Prologues down; | For who can shew me, since they first were writ, | They e'er converted one hard-hearted wit? | PROL. TO THE RIVAL LADIES.
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Octavo
Bibliographic details:
Frontispiece plus additional illustration facing title page. Half title: A | COLLECTION AND SELECTION | OF | ENGLISH | PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES. | [rule] | PROLOGUES.
Comments:
Contents: prose p. 25, 30-31, 50-52.
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Preface pp. [i]-viii. Back matter: Index [6pp.]; Books printed for Fielding and Walker [2pp.]
Related Miscellanies
Title:
A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 3] [T145232] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1779
ESTC No:
T145232
Volume:
3 of 4
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Title:
A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 4] [T145232] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1779
ESTC No:
T145232
Volume:
4 of 4
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Related People
Publisher:
John Fielding
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Publisher:
John Walker
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Open your ears for which of you will stop
Page No:
pp.1-2
Poem Title:
Induction to the Second Part of King Henry the Fourth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
O for a muse of fire that would ascend
Page No:
pp.3-4
Poem Title:
Prologue to King Henry The Fifth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Now all the youth of England are on fire
Page No:
pp.4-5
Poem Title:
Chorus To The Second Act of King Henry The Fifth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Now entertain conjecture of a time
Page No:
pp.6-7
Poem Title:
Chorus To The Fourth Act of King Henry the Fifth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Vouchsafe to those that have not read the story
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
Chorus To The Fifth Act of King Henry The Fifth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I come no more to make you laugh things now
Page No:
pp.10-11
Poem Title:
Prologue To King Henry The Eighth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
In Troy there lies the scene from isles of Greece
Page No:
pp.11-12
Poem Title:
Prologue To Troilus and Cressida.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Two households both alike in dignity
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
Prologue To Romeo And Juliet.
Attribution:
Shakespeare.
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
So free this work is gentlemen from offence
Page No:
p.14
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Custom of The Country.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
But that it would take from our modesty
Page No:
p.15
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Elder Brother.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
To tell ye gentlemen we have a play
Page No:
p.16
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Spanish Curate.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
To please all is impossible and despair
Page No:
p.18
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Mad Lover.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
We need not noble gentlemen to invite
Page No:
p.19
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Loyal Subject.
Attribution:
Written by Fletcher alone, and acted after his death.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
First Line:
Pleasure attend ye and about ye sit
Page No:
p.20
Poem Title:
Prologue To Rule A Wife And Have A Wife.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
New titles warrant not a play for new
Page No:
p.21
Poem Title:
Prologue To The False One.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
To promise much before a play begin
Page No:
p.22
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Little French Lawyer.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Aptness for mirth to all this instant night
Page No:
p.23
Poem Title:
Prologue to The Chances.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
You're welcome gentlemen and would our feast
Page No:
p.24
Poem Title:
Prologue To A Wife For A Month.
Attribution:
Fletcher, alone.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
First Line:
To this place gentlemen full many a day
Page No:
p.26
Poem Title:
Prologue To Love's Pilgrimage.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Ladies to you in whose defence and right
Page No:
p.27
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Woman's Prize.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Would some man would instruct me what to say
Page No:
p.27
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Humourous Lieutenant.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Wit is become an antick and puts on
Page No:
p.28
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Noble Gentleman.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Plays have their fates not as in their true sense
Page No:
p.29
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Fair Maid Of The Inn.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
It's grown in fashion lately in these days
Page No:
p.31
Poem Title:
Prologue To Nice Valour: or, the Passionate Mad-man.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
After twice putting forth to sea his fame
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Guardian.
Attribution:
Massinger.
Attributed To:
Philip Massinger
First Line:
To such and some there are no question here
Page No:
pp.33-34
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Very Woman. Upon Its Revival.
Attribution:
Massinger.
Attributed To:
Philip Massinger
First Line:
Though need make many poets and some such
Page No:
pp.34-35
Poem Title:
Prologue To Every Man In His Humour.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
Now luck yet send us and a little wit
Page No:
pp.36-37
Poem Title:
Prologue To Volpone.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
Truth says of old the art of making plays
Page No:
pp.37-38
Poem Title:
Prologue To Epicoene: Or, The Silent Woman.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
The ends of all who for the scene do write
Page No:
p.39
Poem Title:
A Second Prologue To Epicoene: Or, The Silent Woman.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
Fortune that favours fools these two short hours
Page No:
p.40
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Alchemist.
Attribution:
Jonson
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
The devil is an ass that is today
Page No:
pp.41-42
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Devil's An Ass.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
Your majesty is welcome to a fair
Page No:
p.41
Poem Title:
Prologue To Bartholomew Fair. To The King's Majesty.
Attribution:
Jonson
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
For your own sakes not his he bad me say
Page No:
pp.43-44
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Staple of News. For The Stage.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
A work not smelling of the lamp tonight
Page No:
p.44
Poem Title:
A Second Prologue To The Staple of News. For The Court.
Attribution:
Jonson
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
No state affairs nor any politic club
Page No:
p.45
Poem Title:
Prologue To A Tale of A Tub.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
He that hath feasted you these forty years
Page No:
pp.46-48
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Sad Shepherd.
Attribution:
Jonson
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
A strange play you are like to have for know
Page No:
p.49
Poem Title:
Prologue to the English Traveller.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I come but as a harbinger being sent
Page No:
p.53
Poem Title:
Prologue To A Woman Kill'd With Kindness.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our muse descries no lover's passion
Page No:
p.54
Poem Title:
Prologue to Lingua.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Judicious friends if what shall here be seen
Page No:
p.55
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Heir.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Wit in a prologue poets justly may
Page No:
pp.55-56
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Goblins.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To this fair company I am to say
Page No:
pp.57-58
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Shepherd's Holiday.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If we could hit on it gallants there are due
Page No:
pp.58-59
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Adventures Of Five Hours.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
It is not strange to hear a poet say
Page No:
pp.60-62
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Wild Gallant.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Tis much desired you judges of the town
Page No:
pp.62-63
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Rival Ladies.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Wake wake Quevira our soft rest must cease
Page No:
pp.64-65
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Indian Queen.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Almighty critics whom our indians here
Page No:
pp.65-66
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Indian Emperor.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
He who writ this not without pains and thought
Page No:
pp.66-68
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Maiden Queen.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Fools which each man meets in his dish each day
Page No:
p.69
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Martin Mar-all.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As when a tree's cut down the secret root
Page No:
pp.70-71
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Tempest. Altered by Dryden.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Self love though never rightly understood
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
Prologue To Tyrannick Love.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Lord how reformed and quiet are we grown
Page No:
pp.73-74
Poem Title:
Prologue To Marriage A-La-Mode.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Prologues like bells to churches toll you in
Page No:
pp.74-76
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Assignation.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As needy gallants in the scrivener's hands
Page No:
pp.76-77
Poem Title:
Prologue To Amboyna.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Our author by experience finds it true
Page No:
pp.78-79
Poem Title:
Prologue To Aureng-Zebe.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
What flocks of critics hover here today
Page No:
pp.80-81
Poem Title:
Prologue To All For Love: Or, The World Well Lost.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
True wit has seen its best days long ago
Page No:
pp.81-82
Poem Title:
Prologue To Limberham.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
When Athens all the Grecian state did guide
Page No:
pp.83-84
Poem Title:
Prologue To Oedipus.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
See my loved britons see your Shakespeare rise
Page No:
pp.85-86
Poem Title:
Prologue To Troilus and Cressida, As Altered By Dryden, And Spoken By Mr. Betterton, Representing The Ghost of Shakespeare Crowned With Bays.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now luck for us and a kind hearty pit
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Spanish Fryar.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Our play's a parallel the holy league
Page No:
pp.89-90
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Duke of Guise.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Full twenty years and more our labouring stage
Page No:
pp.91-92
Poem Title:
Prologue To Albion And Albanius. An Opera.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The judge removed though he's no more my lord
Page No:
pp.93-94
Poem Title:
Prologue To Don Sebastian. Spoken By A Woman.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The labouring bee when his sharp sting is gone
Page No:
pp.95-96
Poem Title:
Prologue To Amphitryon. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I think or hope at least the coast is clear
Page No:
pp.97-98
Poem Title:
Prologue To Cleomenes; Or, The Spartan Hero. Spoken by Mr. Mountfort.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Sure there's a dearth of wit in this dull town
Page No:
pp.99-100
Poem Title:
Prologue To King Arthur. An Opera.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As when some treasurer lays down the stick
Page No:
pp.101-102
Poem Title:
Prologue To Love Triumphant.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
So shipwrecked passengers escape to land
Page No:
pp.103-104
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken The First Day Of The King's House Acting After The Fire Of London.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A plain built house after so long a stay
Page No:
pp.104-106
Poem Title:
Prologue, Spoken At The Opening Of The New House, March 26, 1674.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Poets your subjects have their parts assigned
Page No:
pp.106-107
Poem Title:
Prologue To The University Of Oxford, 1674.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Were you but half so wise as you are severe
Page No:
p.108
Poem Title:
Prologue To Circe: A Tragic Opera, By Dr. Davenant, 1675.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Heaven save ye gallants and this hopeful age
Page No:
pp.109-110
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Widow Ranter; By Mrs. Behn, 1690.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The unhappy man who once has trailed a pen
Page No:
pp.110-111
Poem Title:
Prologue To Caesar Borgia. By Mr. N. Lee, 1680.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thespis the first professor of our art
Page No:
pp.112-113
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sophonisba. Written by Nat. Lee, Acted At Oxford, 1680.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
If yet there be a few that take delight
Page No:
pp.113-114
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Loyal General. By Mr. Tate, 1680.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The famed Italian muse whose rhymes advance
Page No:
pp.115-116
Poem Title:
Prologue To The University Of Oxford, 1681.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
In those cold regions which no summers cheer
Page No:
pp.116-117
Poem Title:
Prologue To His Royal Highness, Upon His First Appearance At The Duke's Theatre After His Return From Scotland, 1682.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
When first the ark was landed on the shore
Page No:
pp.118-119
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Earl Of Essex. By Mr. J. Banks, 1682. Spoken To The King And Queen At Their Coming To The House.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Poets like lawful monarchs ruled the stage
Page No:
pp.120-123
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Loyal Brother: Or The Persian Prince. By Mr. Southern, 1682.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
What Greece when learning flourished only knew
Page No:
pp.123-125
Poem Title:
Prologue To The University Of Oxford. Spoken By Mr. Hart, At The Acting Of The Silent Woman.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Discord and plots which have undone our age
Page No:
pp.125-126
Poem Title:
Prologue To The University Of Oxford.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
How comes it gentlemen that nowadays
Page No:
pp.127-129
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Disappointment: Or, The Mother In Fashion. By Mr. Southerne, 1684. Spoken By Mr. Betterton.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Since faction ebbs and rogues grow out of fashion
Page No:
pp.130-132
Poem Title:
Prologue To The King And Queen, Upon The Union Of The Two Companies, In 1686.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Though actors cannot much of learning boast
Page No:
pp.132-133
Poem Title:
Prologue To The University Of Oxford.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
With sickly actors and an old house too
Page No:
pp.134-135
Poem Title:
Prologue On The Revival Of Arviragus And Philicia: By Lodowick Carlell Esq. 1690. Spoken By Mr. Hart.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
What Nostradame with all his art can guess
Page No:
pp.135-137
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Prophetess, By Beaumont and Fletcher. Spoken By Mr. Betterton, 1690.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Save ye sirs save ye I am in a hopeful way
Page No:
pp.137-139
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Mistakes, A Play, Written By Joseph Harris, Comedian, 1690.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
To say this comedy pleased long ago
Page No:
pp.140-141
Poem Title:
Prologue To Albumazar.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
How wretched is the fate of those who write
Page No:
pp.142-144
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Pilgrim, By Beaumont And Fletcher. Revived For Dryden's Benefit, Anno 1700
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Ladies take it as a secret in your ear
Page No:
pp.144-145
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Woman Hater, A Reviv'd Play of Mr. Fletcher's.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
A broiling lamb on Pan's chief altar lies
Page No:
p.146
Poem Title:
Prologue, Sung At The Representation Of The Faithful Shepherdess.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
My lord you in your early youth did fit
Page No:
p.147
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Five Hours Adventure. For The Temple. Addressed To The Lord Chancellor.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Methinks as if assured of some disgrace
Page No:
pp.148-149
Poem Title:
Prologue, The First Days Entertainment At Rutland-House, By Declamations And Music: After The Manner Of The Ancients.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Since you affect things new what I'm to say
Page No:
pp.150-151
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Play-House To Be Let.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Were you but half so humble to confess
Page No:
pp.151-153
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Unfortunate Lovers. Spoken At Black-Friars.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Bless me you kinder stars how are we thronged
Page No:
pp.153-154
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Wits. Spoken At Black-Fryars.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Wit which is all the gold a poet has
Page No:
pp.154-156
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Same. Spoken At The Duke's Theatre.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
But that the tyrant custom bears such sway
Page No:
pp.156-157
Poem Title:
Prologue To Love and Honour.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
No country lady ever yet did ask
Page No:
pp.157-158
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Man's The Master.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Tis worth my smiles to think what enforced ways
Page No:
pp.159-160
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Platonic Lovers.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
A noble company for we can spy
Page No:
p.160
Poem Title:
Prologue To News From Plymouth.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Amaze us not with that majestic frown
Page No:
p.161
Poem Title:
Prologue For The Lady Actors, Spoken Before K. Charles II.
Attribution:
Waller.
Attributed To:
Edmund Waller
First Line:
Scarce should we have the boldness to pretend
Page No:
pp.162-163
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Maid's Tragedy Altered.
Attribution:
Waller.
Attributed To:
Edmund Waller
First Line:
Who says the times to learning disallow
Page No:
pp.163-164
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Guardian. Spoken Before The Prince, Afterwards Charles II.
Attribution:
Cowley.
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
As when the Midland sea is nowhere clear
Page No:
pp.165-166
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Cutter Of Coleman-Street.
Attribution:
Cowley.
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
Stay gentlemen what I have said was all
Page No:
p.166
Poem Title:
Contiunation To The Same. Added At Court.
Attribution:
Cowley.
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
Who could expect such crowding here today
Page No:
pp.167-168
Poem Title:
Prologue To Love In A Tub.
Attribution:
Sir George Etheridge.
Attributed To:
Sir George Etherege
First Line:
Like dancers on the ropes poor poets fare
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Man Of Mode.
Attribution:
Sir George Etheridge.
Attributed To:
Sir George Etherege
First Line:
Wit long oppressed and filled at last with rage
Page No:
pp.170-171
Poem Title:
Prologue To Theodosius: Or, The Force of Love.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Trust was the glory of the foremost age
Page No:
pp.172-173
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Princess of Cleve.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Long has the tribe of poets on the stage
Page No:
pp.173-174
Poem Title:
Prologue To Lucius Junius Brutus.
Attribution:
Lee
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Not careful leaders when the trumpets call
Page No:
pp.175-176
Poem Title:
Prologue To Mithridates, King of Pontus.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
What think ye meant wise providence when first
Page No:
pp.176-178
Poem Title:
Prologue To Constantine The Great. Spoken By Mr. Goodman.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Good plays and perfect sense as scarce are grow
Page No:
pp.178-179
Poem Title:
Prologue To Nero. Spoken By Mr. Haines.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
He whose attempt is shown this night to please
Page No:
pp.179-181
Poem Title:
Prologue To Gloriana: Or, The Court of Augustus Caesar. Spoken By Mrs. Roche.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
This day we show you the most bloody rage
Page No:
pp.181-182
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Massacre Of Paris. Spoken By Mr. Mountfort.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Wits like physicians never can agree
Page No:
pp.182-184
Poem Title:
Prologue To The First Part Of The Rover: Or, The Banish'd Cavaliers.
Attribution:
Written By A Person Of Quality.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain we labour to reform the stage
Page No:
pp.184-185
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Second Part Of The Rover.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
I am the ghost of him who was a true son
Page No:
pp.186-187
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Round-Heads; Or, The Good Old Cause. Spoken By The Ghost Of Hewson, Ascending From Hell, Dress'd As A Cobler.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Gallants you have so long been absent hence
Page No:
pp.188-189
Poem Title:
Prologue To Abdelazer; Or, The Moor's Revenge.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Beauty like wit can only charm when new
Page No:
pp.189-190
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Young King.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
How vain have proved the labours of the stage
Page No:
pp.191-193
Poem Title:
Prologue To The City Heiress. Spoken By Mrs. Barrey.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
The devil take this cursed plotting age
Page No:
pp.193-194
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Feign'd Courtezans. Spoken By Mrs. Currer.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
As country squire who yet had never known
Page No:
p.195
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Town-Fop.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Know all ye whigs and tories of the pit
Page No:
pp.196-179[i.e.197]
Poem Title:
Prologue To The False Count. Spoken By Mr. Smith.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Since with old plays you have so long been cloyed
Page No:
pp.198-199
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Lucky Chance.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Gallants our poets have of late so used ye
Page No:
pp.199-201
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Forced Marriage.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
We write not now as the ancient poets writ
Page No:
pp.202-203
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Patient Fancy.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Long and at vast expense the industrious stage
Page No:
pp.203-205
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Emperor Of The Moon. Spoken By Mr. Jevern.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Well you expect a prologue to the play
Page No:
pp.206-207
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Amorous Prince.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
As rivals of each other jealous prove
Page No:
pp.207-208
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Younger Brother. Acted After Mrs. Behn's Death.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How popular are poets nowadays
Page No:
pp.209-210
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Sullen Lovers. Spoken By Ninny, A Character In The Play.
Attribution:
Shadwell.
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Since you are still resolved to be severe
Page No:
pp.210-211
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Humourists.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
One of the poets as they safely may
Page No:
pp.212-213
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Royal Shepherdess.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You came with such an eager appetite
Page No:
pp.213-214
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Virtuouso.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As a young wanton when she first begins
Page No:
pp.214-216
Poem Title:
Prologue To Psyche.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our author sent me hither for a scout
Page No:
pp.216-217
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Libertine.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poets and thieves can scarce be rooted out
Page No:
pp.217-218
Poem Title:
Prologue To Epsom-Wells.
Attribution:
Written By Sir. C. Sedley.
Attributed To:
Sir Charles Sedley
First Line:
Poets and soldiers used to various chance
Page No:
pp.219-220
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Same. Addressed To The King And Queen. Spoken At Whitehall.
Attribution:
Shadwell.
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Since the bare gleanings of the stage are grown
Page No:
pp.220-221
Poem Title:
Prologue To Timon Of Athens.
Attribution:
Shadwell.
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Our poet never doubts the good success
Page No:
pp.222-223
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Miser. The Author's Name Not Being Then Known.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Our poet once resolved to quit the stage
Page No:
pp.223-224
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Lancashire Witches.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Lord how the poets in these times will pine
Page No:
pp.225-226
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Woman-Captain.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
How have we in the space of one poor age
Page No:
pp.226-228
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Squire of Alsatia.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
To what hard laws you comic writers bind
Page No:
pp.228-230
Poem Title:
Prologue To Bury-Fair.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Some of our author's special friends will say
Page No:
pp.230-231
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Amorous Bigot: With The Second Part of Teague O'Divelly.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Scourers me thinks I hear some ladies say
Page No:
pp.232-233
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Scowerers.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Our poet taught by you sirs to despise
Page No:
pp.233-235
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Volunteers. Written By Mr. Shadwell, And Designed To Be Spoken, But Was Lost When The Play Was Acted.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Since death's a buccaneer and the world will rob
Page No:
pp.235-236
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Same. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I the plain dealer am to act today
Page No:
pp.237-238
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Plain-Dealer. Spoken By The Plain-Dealer.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Poets like cudgeled bullies never do
Page No:
pp.239-240
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Country-Wife.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Our author like us finding twould scarce do
Page No:
pp.240-241
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Gentleman Dancing-Master. Addressed To The City, Newly After The Removal Of The Duke's Company From Lincoln's-Inn-Fields, To Their New Theatre, Near Salisbury-Court.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Custom which bids the thief from cart harangue
Page No:
pp.241-242
Poem Title:
Prologue To Love In A Wood.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Never did rhymer greater hazard run
Page No:
pp.243-244
Poem Title:
Prologue To Alcibiades.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
When first our author took this play in hand
Page No:
pp.244-245
Poem Title:
Prologue To Don Carlos, Prince of Spain.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Gallants our author met me here today
Page No:
p.246
Poem Title:
Prologue To Titus And Berenice.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
How hard a task hath that poor drudge of stage
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
Prologue To Friendship In Fashion.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Forsaken dames with less concern reflect
Page No:
pp.248-249
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Soldier's Fortune.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Though plays and prologues never did more abound
Page No:
pp.250-251
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Atheist. Or, The Second Part of The Soldier's Fortune.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
In these distracted times when each man dreads
Page No:
pp.251[i.e. 252]-253
Poem Title:
Prologue To Venice Preserved.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
To you great judges in this writing age
Page No:
pp.253-254
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Orphan.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
The ladies have a lonely summer passed
Page No:
pp.255-256
Poem Title:
Prologue To Sir Antony Love. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Gallants you're welcome to our homely cheer
Page No:
pp.257-158[i.e. 258]
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Wives Excuse. Spoken By Mr. Betterton.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
They who must write for writing's a disease
Page No:
pp.158[i.e.258]-259
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Maid's Last Prayer.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
When once a poet settles an ill name
Page No:
p.260
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Fatal Marriage.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
As when in hostile times two neighbouring states
Page No:
pp.261-262
Poem Title:
Prologue To Oroonoko.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Our bard resolved to quit this wicked town
Page No:
pp.262-264
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Fate of Capua.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
When realms are ravaged with invasive foes
Page No:
pp.264-265
Poem Title:
Prologue To The Spartan Dame.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
From the dull beaten road resolved to stray
Page No:
pp.266-267
Poem Title:
Prologue To Money The Mistress.
Attribution:
Southerne.
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne