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A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 4] [T145232] [ecco]

DMI number:
1423
Publication Date:
1779
Volume Number:
4 of 4
ESTC number:
T145232
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW113373564
Shelfmark:
ECCO - BOD
Full Title:
A | COLLECTION AND SELECTION | OF | ENGLISH | PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES. | COMMENCING WITH | [i]SHAKESPEARE[/i] | AND CONCLUDING WITH | [i]GARRICK.[/i] | IN FOUR VOLUMES. | VOLUME IV. | [epigraph] | [rule] | LONDON: | PRINTED FOR | FIELDING AND WALKER, PATERNOSTER-ROW. | MDCCLXXIX.
Epigraph:
Why there should be an Epilogue to a Play, | I know no cause. The old and usual way, | Why they were made, was to intreat the grace, | Of such as were spectators. - | EPIL. TO THE CUSTOM OF THE COUNTRY.
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Octavo
Bibliographic details:
Half title: A | COLLECTION AND SELECTION | OF | ENGLISH | PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES. | [rule] | EPILOGUES. Plates.
Comments:
Contents: prose pp. 9-11.
Other matter:
Back matter: Index [5pp.]; Catalogue of books printed for Fielding and Walker [4pp.]
Related Miscellanies
Title:
A collection and selection of english prologues and epilogues [vol 1] [T145232] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1779
ESTC No:
T145232
Volume:
1 of 4
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Title:
A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 2] [T145232] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1779
ESTC No:
T145232
Volume:
2 of 4
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Title:
A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 3] [T145232] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1779
ESTC No:
T145232
Volume:
3 of 4
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Related People
Publisher:
John Fielding
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Publisher:
John Walker
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
When Orpheus tuned his lyre to pleasing woe
Page No:
pp.1-2
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The British Enchanters.
Attribution:
Addison.
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
I come not here your poet's fate to see
Page No:
pp.2-4
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love And A Bottle. Spoken By Jo. Haynes, In Mourning.
Attribution:
Farquhar.
Attributed To:
George Farquhar
First Line:
Now depart each his respective way
Page No:
pp.4-5
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Constant Couple.
Attribution:
Farquhar.
Attributed To:
George Farquhar
First Line:
As a poor stranger wrecked upon the coast
Page No:
p.6
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken By Mr. Wilks At His First Appearance Upon The English Stage.
Attribution:
Farquhar.
Attributed To:
George Farquhar
First Line:
Ventre bleu vere is dis dam poet vere
Page No:
pp.7-8
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sir Harry Wildair.
Attribution:
Farquhar.
Attributed To:
George Farquhar
First Line:
Our poet opened with a loud and warlike blast
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Twin Rivals. Spoken By Aurelia.
Attribution:
Farquhar.
Attributed To:
George Farquhar
First Line:
If to our play your judgment can't be kind
Page No:
p.11
Poem Title:
Epilogue Designed To Be Spoken To The Beaux Stratagem.
Attribution:
Farquhar.
Attributed To:
George Farquhar
First Line:
Shall authors tease the town with tragic passion
Page No:
pp.12-13
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Captives.
Attribution:
Gay.
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Too long the poets brought before the bar
Page No:
pp.13-41 [i.e. 14]
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Perjur'd Husband.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
You see gallants it has been our poet's care
Page No:
pp.15-16
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Beau's Duel.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
As one condemned and ready to become
Page No:
pp.16-18
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Gamester.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
This goodly fabric to a gazing tar
Page No:
pp.18-19
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Basset-Table.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
In spite of dull insipid rules I'm come
Page No:
pp.19-20
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love At A Venture. Spoken By Miss Jacobella Power.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
The plodding tribe are so resolved of late
Page No:
pp.20-21
Poem Title:
A Second Epilogue To The Same. Spoken By Mr. Penkethman.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
You've seen what scholar is in cap and gown
Page No:
pp.21-22
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Stolen Heiress.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
What if to end this fortune telling play
Page No:
pp.22-24
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love's Contrivance.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
In me you see one busy body more
Page No:
pp.24-24[i.e. 25]
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Busy Body.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
To you the tyrant critics of the age
Page No:
pp.24 [i.e. 25]-26
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Platonic Lady.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
What mighty pains our scribbling sot has shown
Page No:
pp.26-27
Poem Title:
A Second Epilogue To The Same. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
Your servant masters I'm sent on a message
Page No:
p.28
Poem Title:
A Third Epilogue To The Same. Spoken By Mr. Norris As Drawer.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
Oh woe is me oh oh oh what shall I say
Page No:
pp.29-30
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Perplex'd Lovers. Spoken By Mr. Norris In Mourning.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
In those good times when war is like to cease
Page No:
pp.30-31
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Same. Design'd To Have Been Spoken The First Night By Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
Custom with all our modern laws combined
Page No:
pp.32-33
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Wonder. Spoken By Miss Santlow.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
What's this a billet doux from hands unknown
Page No:
pp.33-35
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Man's Bewitch'd. Spoken By Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
What new strange ways our modern beaus devise
Page No:
pp.35-36
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A Bold Stroke For A Wife.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
Since plotting is the business of the age
Page No:
pp.37-38
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Artifice. Spoken By Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Centlivre.
Attributed To:
Susanna Centlivre
First Line:
Prodigious this the frail one of our play
Page No:
pp.38-40
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Jane Shore. Designed For Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Pope.
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Well ladies so much for the tragic style
Page No:
pp.40-41
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Cleone.
Attribution:
Shenstone.
Attributed To:
William Shenstone
First Line:
What could luxurious woman wish for more
Page No:
pp.42-43
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Mary Queen Of Scots.
Attribution:
By The Right Hon. L. M. W. M.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A plague upon all cowards still I say
Page No:
pp.44-54[i.e. 45]
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Shakespeare's First Part Of King Henry IV. Spoken By Mr. J. Y. In The Character Of Falstaff. Acted By Young Gentlemen At
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Britons once more in annual joy we meet
Page No:
pp.46-48
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Tamerlane. On The Suppression Of The Rebellion. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard, In The Character Of The Comic Muse, November 4, 1746.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Before you sign poor Sophonisba's doom
Page No:
pp.49-50
Poem Title:
Epilogue Designed For Sophonisba.
Attribution:
Written By Lord Hervey.
Attributed To:
John Hervey
First Line:
Some critic or I'm deceived will ask
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Comus, Spokne By Mrs. Clive, In The Dress Of Euphrosyne, With The Wand And Cup.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There was a time when in his younger years
Page No:
p.52
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Money The Mistress, Being The Last Piece Written By Mr. Southerne.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Young and unpractised in dramatic rules
Page No:
p.53
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Beaux Stratagem, As It Was Acted By Some Young Gentlemen In The Country.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Still as the heroine of the tragic scene
Page No:
pp.54-55
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Artful Wife
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Taverner.
Attributed To:
William Taverner
First Line:
You reverend members of the upper row
Page No:
pp.55-56
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Coquet.
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Molley.
Attributed To:
Charles Molloy
First Line:
Here as your faces in a glass ye see
Page No:
pp.56-57
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Country Wife ....Spoken By Mrs. Younger In The Character Of The Country Wife.
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Cook.
Attributed To:
Thomas Cooke
First Line:
Well I suppose good folks ye're all a gog
Page No:
p.58
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Penelope...Spoken Bu Minerva.
Attribution:
By The Same [i.e. Cooke]
Attributed To:
Thomas Cooke
First Line:
Though just now killed I thus resume my breath
Page No:
pp.59-60
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Valentinian, Spoken In Boy's Cloaths By Miss Santlow, Afterwards Mrs. Booth, Who Acted The Part Of The Eunuch In The Play.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As some brave soldier when soft peace gives rest
Page No:
pp.60-61
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Don Quixot, For Mr. Bickerstaff's Benefit, Spoken By Miss Santlow In Boy's Cloaths.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
O gentlemen I'm come but was not sent ye
Page No:
pp.62-63
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Eurydice...Spoken By Miss Robinson, In Boy's Clothes, Tripping in Hastily.
Attribution:
By Aaron Hill, Esq.
Attributed To:
Aaron Hill
First Line:
Well ladies of the art of masonry
Page No:
pp.63-65
Poem Title:
Epilogue For The Free-Masons. Spoken By Mrs. Younger At The Theatre In Lincolns-Inn-Fields, April 27, 1732.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hold consort where's this epilogue I pray
Page No:
pp.65-67
Poem Title:
Epilogue Spoken At York, By Mr. Keregan And His Wife.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of old the romans acted comic plays
Page No:
pp.68-69
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Eunuch Of Terence. Acted By The King's Scholars At Westminster, February 6, 1733. Spoken Just After The Death Of Doctor Freind Master Of Westminster.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Great minds to strokes of fortune never yield
Page No:
pp.69-70
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Volpone. Acted By The Young Gentlemen Of Bury-School, Nov. 5, 1734, In The New Theatre There.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I have been peeping for these many days
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Pseudolus Of Plautus. Acted By The Scholars Of Bury-School, November 6, 1734.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well if all husbands keep so great a pother
Page No:
pp.72-73
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Venice Preserv'd Spoken By Belidera.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Cato revives again to cheer the fair
Page No:
pp.73-75
Poem Title:
Epilogue. Spoken In The Character Of Cato, At Port-Arlington School, Ireland.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well now we've done I'll feed my sex's failing
Page No:
pp.75-77
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Careless Husband. Spoken By Lady E. Modish and Lord Foppington.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well for this once I'll undertake the part
Page No:
pp.77-78
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Mustapha. Spoken By Mr. Quin.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Such were the scenes Italian fancy wrought
Page No:
pp.78-79
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Faithful Shepherd. Spoken By Mrs. Furnival.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How happy chance may alter one's condition
Page No:
pp.79-80
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Mock Doctor.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Forgive me Cato and forgive me Rome
Page No:
p.81
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Cato. As Acted By The Young Gentlemen Of The King's School At Rochester, 1743.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis not a birth to titles pomp or state
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
Epilogue, On The Birth Day Of His Royal Highness The Duke Of Cumberland, 1746.
Attribution:
Written by The Farmer*, and Spoken By Mr. Garrick At The Theatre Royal, In Dublin. *Mr. Brooke, author of the Farmer's letters.
Attributed To:
Henry Brooke
First Line:
Peace bookworm bless me what a clerk have I
Page No:
pp.84-85
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Ignoramus. Acted At Westminster School In December, 1747. Spoken By Ignoramus And Musaeus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well gentlemen and are you still so vain
Page No:
pp.86-87
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Coriolanus. Spoken By Mrs. Woffington, 1749.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The prologue's filled with such fine phrases
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken By Prince Edward And Lady Augusta, On Performing The Tragedy Of Cato, At Leiceister [sic] House, 1749.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I'm glad with all my heart I've scaped my wedding
Page No:
pp.89-90
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Merope. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard In The Character of Merope, 1749.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Too long provoked in these censorious times
Page No:
pp.91-92
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The British Taste.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Against such odds if Edward could succeed
Page No:
pp.93-94
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Edward The Black Prince. Spoken By Mrs. Clive, 1750.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies by me our courteous author sends
Page No:
pp.94-95
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Roman Father.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I'll do it by heaven I will pray get you gone
Page No:
pp.96-97
Poem Title:
Epilogue. By Mrs. Clive, On The Two Occasional Prologues, Spoken At Covent-Garden And Drury-Lane, 1750.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all the various wonders wit can do
Page No:
pp.98-99
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Eugenia.
Attribution:
Written By Colley Cibber, Esq. And Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
On every gamester in the Arabian nation
Page No:
pp.99-100
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Gamester. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An epilogue through custom is your right
Page No:
pp.101-102
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Brothers.
Attribution:
Written By Dr. Young.
Attributed To:
Edward Young
First Line:
News news good folks rare news and you shall know it
Page No:
pp.102-104
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Earl of Essex. Spoken By Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now we have shown the fatal fruits of strife
Page No:
pp.104-105
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Boadicia. Spoken By Mr. Havard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Poor I tossed up and down from shore to shore
Page No:
pp.105-106
Poem Title:
Mr. Macklin's Farewell Epilogue To The Refusal. Acted For His Benefit, In The Year 1753.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
While our grave hermit busy above stairs
Page No:
pp.107-110
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Masque Of Alfred.
Attribution:
Written By Mr. Rolt, And Spoken By Mrs. Clive.
Attributed To:
Richard Rolt
First Line:
The curtain falls but hold our modern vogue
Page No:
pp.110-112
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Adelphi Of Terence. Acted By The Charter-House Scholars, 1753. Spoken By -- Eyre, In The Character Of The Fidicina.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I should not dare appear again before ye
Page No:
pp.112-113
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Philoclea. Spoken By Mrs. Bland.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I told the bard ay yonder he stands quaking
Page No:
pp.113-115
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Appius. Spoken By Mrs. Bellamy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Place ancient Rome and Britain in the scale
Page No:
pp.115-117
Poem Title:
An Occasional Epilogue To Appius.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whoever begot thee has no cause to blush
Page No:
pp.117-119
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Conscious Lovers. Acted At Covent-Garden Theatre, December 5, 1752, For The Benefit Of The Middlesex-Hospital.
Attribution:
Written By C. Smart, M. A. And Spoken By Mr. Shuter, In The Character Of A Man-Midwife.
Attributed To:
Christopher Smart
First Line:
A very pretty bill as I'm alive
Page No:
pp.119-121
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Apprentice. Spoken By Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Aye now I can with pleasure look around
Page No:
pp.121-122
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Reprisal. Spoken By Miss Macklin.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
And can it be sure they have all mistook
Page No:
pp.123-126
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Heautonti-Morumenos, Of Terence. Acted By The Young Gentlemen Of Beverley School, 1756. Spoken By The Young Gentlemen Who Play'd Syrus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Twas in my roost of eminence that lies
Page No:
pp.126-127
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken By George Alexander Stevens, At The Conclusion Of The Disquisition In The Haymarket.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Raised by your favour from the barren shade
Page No:
pp.128-129
Poem Title:
An Occasional Epilogue To The Gentle Shepherd. Spoken By Mr. Lauder, At The New Theatre In The Hay-Market, For His Benefit.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well you expect so says the taste in vogue
Page No:
pp.129-130
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Constantine. Spoken By Mrs. Bellamy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
At length I'm freed from tragical parade
Page No:
pp.130-131
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Creusa. Spoken By Miss Haughton.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Stay ladies though I am almost tired to death
Page No:
pp.131-133
Poem Title:
A Second Epilogue To The Same. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Much has been said in this reforming age
Page No:
pp.133-134
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken By Mrs. Hallam, At The Opening Of A New Theatre At Philadelphia, By A Company Of Comedians From London, April 15, 1754.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My conduct now will every mind employ
Page No:
pp.134-135
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Gamesters. Spoken By Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A king in bloom of youth for freedom die
Page No:
pp.136-137
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Agis.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When vice and folly are a nation's bane
Page No:
pp.137-139
Poem Title:
Epilogue Intended To Be Spoken By Mr. Shuter, In The Character Of A Schoolmaster, With A Rod In His Hand.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis kind ye fair thus patiently to wait
Page No:
pp.140-141
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Terence's Andrian. Spoken By Master Coates, In The Character Of Mysis.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Who could have ever thought to have seen me
Page No:
pp.141-142
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Albion Queens. Spoken By Jo. Haines.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The play is at an end but where's the plot
Page No:
p.142
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Rehearsal.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies I've had a squabble with the poet
Page No:
pp.143-144
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Jealous Wife. Spoken By Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well ladies will you patronise or no
Page No:
pp.145-146
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Discovery. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies methinks I hear you all complain
Page No:
pp.146-741[i.e. 147]
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Dupe. Spoken By Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What we must all come to what come to what
Page No:
pp.148-149
Poem Title:
Epilogue To What We must All Come To. Spoken By Miss Elliott.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ladies your country's ornament and pride
Page No:
pp.149-150
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Fashionable Lover. Spoken By Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The grecian daughter's compliments to all
Page No:
pp.151-152
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Grecian Daughter. Spoken By Miss Younge.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tis very fine indeed all matched I see
Page No:
pp.153-154
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A Wife In The Right. Spoken By Mrs. Mattocks.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Critics before you rise one word I pray
Page No:
pp.155-156
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Gamesters. Spoken By Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Well I protest there's no such thing as dealing
Page No:
pp.156-157
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Prince Of Tunis. Spoken By Mrs. Weston.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our play thus over now swells each throbbing breast
Page No:
p.158
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Alzuma. Spoken By Mrs. Hartley.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though lately dead a princess and of Spain
Page No:
pp.159-160
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Alonzo. Spoken By Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
So men of valour you dislike our play
Page No:
pp.161-162
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Duellist. Spoken By Miss Barsanti.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Can it be thought ye wives this scribbling fool
Page No:
pp.162-164
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The School For Wives. Spoken By Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When plays are over by epilogue we're able
Page No:
pp.164-167
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Man Of Business. Spoken By Mrs. Bulkley.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh such a sight I've been upon the course
Page No:
pp.167-168
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Note Of Hand; Or, A Trip To Newmarket.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of mortal men how equal is the date
Page No:
pp.169-170
Poem Title:
Occasional Epilogue, Spoken By Miss Barsanti, On The Death Of The Manager Of The Theatre-Royal, Covent-Garden, May 26, 1774.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Among the arts to make a piece go down
Page No:
pp.171-172
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Englishman Returned From Paris. Spoken By Mrs. Bellamy.
Attribution:
Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
Hold sir | Our plot concluded and strict justice done
Page No:
pp.172-174
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Lyar. Between Miss Grantham and Old Wilding.
Attribution:
Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
Let me entreat you madam pause a bit
Page No:
pp.174-175
Poem Title:
Epilogue Designed For The Nabob. Prompter and Lady.
Attribution:
Foote.
Attributed To:
Samuel Foote
First Line:
From Otway's and immortal Shakespeare's page
Page No:
pp.175-177
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Clementina. Spoken By Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
What horrors fill the tragic poet's brain
Page No:
pp.177-178
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Timantehs. Spoken By Mrs. Bulkley.
Attribution:
Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Great and fair ladies lords gallant and mighty
Page No:
pp.179-180
Poem Title:
Epilogue To King Henry The Second. Or The Fall Of Rosamond. Spoken By Miss Barsanti.
Attribution:
Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
A female doctor sirs and pray why not
Page No:
pp.181-182
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Spleen; Or, Islington Spa. Spoken by Mrs. King, in the character of Dr. Anodyne.
Attribution:
Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
I who was late so volatile and gay
Page No:
pp.182-184
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The School For Scandal. Spoken By Mrs. Abington, in the character of Lady Teazel.
Attribution:
Colman.
Attributed To:
George Colman
First Line:
Hold prompter hold a word before your nonsense
Page No:
pp.184-186
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken By Mr. Lee Lewes, In The Character Of Harlequin, At His Benefit.
Attribution:
Goldsmith.
Attributed To:
Oliver Goldsmith
First Line:
What five long acts and all to make us wiser
Page No:
pp.186-188
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Sister. Spoken By Mrs. Bulkley.
Attribution:
Goldsmith.
Attributed To:
Oliver Goldsmith
First Line:
Well having stooped to conquer with success
Page No:
pp.188-189
Poem Title:
Epilogue To She Stoops To Conquer. Spoken By Mrs. Bulkley.
Attribution:
Goldsmith.
Attributed To:
Oliver Goldsmith
First Line:
Such were the scenes while base corruption strayed
Page No:
pp.189-109[i.e. 190]
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Election.
Attribution:
Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
The muse who late with melancholy pride
Page No:
pp.109 [i.e. 190]-191
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sir Thomas Overbury.
Attribution:
Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
Thou loathsome dungeon in whose drear womb
Page No:
pp.192-194
Poem Title:
Epilogue. Spoken Before The Society Of The Thatch'd House Tavern, For The Relief And Discharge Of Persons Imprisoned For Small Debts. December 3, 1774.
Attribution:
Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
A roman parent sacrifice a son
Page No:
pp.194-195
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Roman Sacrifice.
Attribution:
Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
From ancient Thespis to the present age
Page No:
pp.195-196
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Battle Of Hastings.
Attribution:
Cumberland.
Attributed To:
Richard Cumberland
First Line:
The poet's pen can like a conjurer's wand
Page No:
pp.197-198
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Virginia.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
I know you all expect from seeing me
Page No:
pp.198-200
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Foundling. Spoken By Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
As the success of authors is uncertain
Page No:
pp.200-201
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Gil Blas.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Pshaw damn your epilogue and hold your tongue
Page No:
pp.202-203
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Bararossa. Spoken By Mr. Woodward, In The Character Of A fine Gentleman.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
To speak ten words again I've fetched my breath
Page No:
pp.204-205
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Athelstan. Spoken By Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
If any here are Britons but in name
Page No:
pp.206-207
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Earl Of Essex. Spoken By Mrs. Pritchard, In The Character Of Queen Elizabeth.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Old times old fashions and the fairies gone
Page No:
pp.207-209
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Edgar And Emeline.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
That I'm a lying rogue you all agree
Page No:
pp.209-210
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Lying Valet. Spoken By Mr. Garrick.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
I long to know dear sirs with due submission
Page No:
pp.211-212
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The School For Rakes. Spoken By Mrs. Clive.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Stripped of my tragic weeds and raised from death
Page No:
pp.212-213
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Hecuba. Spoken By Miss Bride.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ladies and gentlemen tis so ill bred
Page No:
pp.213-215
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Elvira. Spoken By Mrs. Cibber.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Exhausted quite with prisons racks and death
Page No:
pp.215-217
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Earl Of Warwick. Spoken By Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
I'll hear no more thou wretch attend to reason
Page No:
pp.217-220
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The English Merchant. Enter Lady Alton [Mrs. Abington] in a passion; Spatter, [Mr. King] following.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
When with the comic muse a bard hath dealing
Page No:
pp.221-222
Poem Title:
Epilogue To False Delicacy.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
How do you all good folks in tears for certain
Page No:
pp.223-224
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Zenobia. Spoken By Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Bless me this summer work is so fatiguing
Page No:
pp.225-226
Poem Title:
Epilogue To All In The Wrong. Spoken By Mrs. Yates.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ye critics above and ye critics below
Page No:
pp.227-228
Poem Title:
Song By Way Of Epilogue To All In The Wrong.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
I'm sent good folks to speak the epilogue
Page No:
pp.229-230
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Zingis. Spoken By Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
A female bard far from her native land
Page No:
pp.230-232
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Almida. Spoken By Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
As it is proved by scholars of great fame
Page No:
pp.232-234
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sethona. Spoken By Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
In parliament whenever a question comes
Page No:
pp.234-235
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Maid Of The Oaks. Spoken By Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
As I'm an artist can my skill do better
Page No:
pp.236-237
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Cholerick Man. Spoken By Mrs. Abington.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
What son of physic but his art extends
Page No:
pp.238-239
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Inflexible Captive.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Ladies before I go will you allow
Page No:
pp.240-241
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Discovery. Spoken By Mr. Garrick, In The Character Of Sir Anthony Branville.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Post haste from Italy arrives my lover
Page No:
pp.241-243
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Runaway. Spoken By Miss Younge.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
If after tragedy tis made a rule
Page No:
pp.243-245
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Know Your Own Mind. Spoken By Mrs. Mattocks.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
I must will speak I hope my dress and air
Page No:
pp.245-246
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Percy. Spoken By Mr. Lee Lewes.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Our bards of late so tragic in their calling
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Alfred. Spoken By Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
What various modes prevail in various parts
Page No:
pp.248-250
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Spanish Barber.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
The critics say and constantly repeat
Page No:
pp.250-252
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Suicide. Spoken By Miss Farren.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Prologues and epilogues to speak the phrase
Page No:
pp.252-254
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Fathers. Spoken By Miss Younge.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick
First Line:
Such strains as mingled with the lyre
Page No:
p.254
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Carmen Seculare.
Attribution:
Garrick.
Attributed To:
David Garrick