Blacklight

A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 2] [T145232] [ecco]

DMI number:
1342
Publication Date:
1779
Volume Number:
2 of 4
ESTC number:
T145232
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW113372976
Shelfmark:
ECCO - BOD
Full Title:
A | COLLECTION AND SELECTION | OF | ENGLISH | PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES. | COMMENCING WITH | [i]SHAKESPEARE[/i], | AND CONCLUDING WITH | [i]GARRICK.[/i] | IN FOUR VOLUMES. | VOLUME II. | [epigraph] | [rule] | LONDON: | PRINTED FOR | FIELDING AND WALKER, PATERNOSTER-ROW. | MDCCLXXIX.
Epigraph:
Why there should be an Epilogue to a Play, | I know no cause. The old and usual way, | Why they were made, was to intreat the grace, | Of such as were spectators. - | EPIL. TO THE CUSTOM OF THE COUNTRY.
Place of Publication:
London
Format:
Octavo
Bibliographic details:
Half title: A | COLLECTION AND SELECTION | OF | ENGLISH | PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES. | [rule] | EPILOGUES .
Comments:
Contents: prose pp. 3-4, 4-6, 16, 30-31. Duplicate poem: poem 3723 appears twice in this miscellany, pp. 87-88 + 195-196.
Other matter:
Back matter: Index [8pp.]
Related Miscellanies
Title:
A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 3] [T145232] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1779
ESTC No:
T145232
Volume:
3 of 4
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Title:
A collection and selection of English prologues and epilogues [vol 4] [T145232] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1779
ESTC No:
T145232
Volume:
4 of 4
Relationship:
Volume from the same edition
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Now my charms are all over thrown
Page No:
pp.1-2
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Tempest. Spoken By Prospero.
Attribution:
Shakespeare
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
If we shadows have offended
Page No:
p.2
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A Midsummer-Night's Dream. Spoken By Puck.
Attribution:
Shakespeare
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
The king's a beggar now the play is done
Page No:
p.4
Poem Title:
Epilogue to All's Well That Ends Well.
Attribution:
Shakespeare
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Thus far with rough and all unable pen
Page No:
p.6
Poem Title:
Epilogue To King Henry The Fifth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
Tis ten to one this play can never please
Page No:
p.7
Poem Title:
Epilogue To King Henry The Eighth.
Attribution:
Shakespeare
Attributed To:
William Shakespeare
First Line:
I spake much in the prologue for the play
Page No:
p.8
Poem Title:
A Second To The Same.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Why there should be an epilogue to a play
Page No:
p.8
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Custom Of The Country.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
The play is done yet our suit never ends
Page No:
p.9
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Spanish Curate.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Tis not the hands or smiles or common way
Page No:
p.9
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Elder Brother.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Here lies the doubt now let our plays be good
Page No:
pp.10-11
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Mad Lover.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
I am not cured yet thoroughly for believe
Page No:
p.10
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Humorous Lieutenant.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Though something well assured few here repent
Page No:
p.11
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Loyal Subject.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Good night our worthy friends and may you part
Page No:
p.12
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Rule a Wife and Have A Wife.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
I now should wish another had my place
Page No:
p.12
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The False One.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Gentlemen | I am sent forth to enquire what you decree
Page No:
p.13
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Little French Lawyer.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
We would fain please ye and as fain be pleased
Page No:
pp.13-14
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Valentinian.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
We have not held you long nor do I see
Page No:
p.14
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Chances.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Still doubtful and perplexed too whether he
Page No:
p.15
Poem Title:
Prologue [sic] To The Lover's Progress.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
We have your favours gentlemen and you
Page No:
p.15
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A Wife For A Month.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
If you mislike as you shall ever be
Page No:
p.16
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Captain.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Our author fears there are some rebel hearts
Page No:
p.17
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love's Cure; Or, The Martial Maid.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
The tamer's tamed but so as nor the men
Page No:
p.18
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Woman's Prize. Or, The Tamer Tamed.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
The monuments of virtue and desert
Page No:
p.19
Poem Title:
Prologue [sic] to the Noble Gentleman.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
There is no coronation today
Page No:
pp.19-20
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Coronation. Spoken By The Queen.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Tis ended by my hopes and fears begin
Page No:
p.20
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Coxcomb.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
I would ask ye how ye like the play
Page No:
p.22
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Two Noble Kinsmen.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
We need not tell you gallants that this night
Page No:
p.22
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Wit At Several Weapons. At The Reviving of this Play.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
Now as the husbandman whose costs and pain
Page No:
p.23
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Four Plays, Or, Moral Representations In One.
Attribution:
Beaumont and Fletcher.
Attributed To:
John Fletcher
Francis Beaumont
First Line:
We've reason to be doubtful whether he
Page No:
p.24
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Emperor Of The East.
Attribution:
Massinger.
Attributed To:
Philip Massinger
First Line:
But your allowance and in that our all
Page No:
p.25
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A New Way To Pay Old Debts.
Attribution:
Massinger.
Attributed To:
Philip Massinger
First Line:
Pray you gentlemen keep your seats something I would
Page No:
pp.25-26
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Bashful Lover.
Attribution:
Massinger.
Attributed To:
Philip Massinger
First Line:
I am left to enquire then to relate
Page No:
p.26
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Guardian.
Attribution:
Massinger.
Attributed To:
Philip Massinger
First Line:
Custom and that's a law we must obey
Page No:
p.27
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A Very Woman.
Attribution:
Massinger.
Attributed To:
Philip Massinger
First Line:
Gentles be it known to you since I went in
Page No:
p.28
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Cynthia's Revels. Spoken By Mercury.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
Thus have you seen the maker's double scope
Page No:
p.29
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Staple of News.
Attribution:
Jonson.
Attributed To:
Benjamin Jonson
First Line:
Oh wearisome condition of humanity
Page No:
p.32
Poem Title:
Chorus Sacerdotum. To The Tragedy of Mustapha.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now expectation hath at full received
Page No:
p.33
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Hog Hath Lost His Pearl.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Your modest silence full of heedy stillness
Page No:
p.34
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Malcontent.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An honest crew disposed to be merry
Page No:
p.35
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A Woman Kill'd With Kindness.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oh may you find in this our pageant here
Page No:
p.36
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Eastward Hoe. Spoken By Quicksilver.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You've seen the muse's looking glass ladies fair
Page No:
pp.36-37
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Muse's Looking Glass. Roscius Solus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though we are now no beggars of the crew
Page No:
p.37
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Merry Beggars. Spoken By Meriel.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
And how and how in faith a pretty plot
Page No:
pp.38-39
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Heir.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Our heir is fallen from her inheritance
Page No:
p.38
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Heir.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To you most royal pair whose lives have brought
Page No:
p.39
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Shepherd's Holiday. Addressed To The King And Queen.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Through many hazards love hath found a way
Page No:
p.40
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love Will Find Out The Way.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You see what shifts we are enforced to try
Page No:
pp.40-41
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Indian Queen. Spoken By Montezuma.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
To all and singular in this full meeting
Page No:
pp.41-42
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Indian Emperor. Spoken By A Mercury.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Our poet something doubtful of his fate
Page No:
pp.42-44
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Maiden Queen.
Attribution:
Written By A Person Of Honour, And Spoken By Nell Gwynn.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As country vicars when the sermon's done
Page No:
p.44
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sir Martin Mar-all.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Hold are you mad you damned confounded dog
Page No:
pp.45-46
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Tyrannick Love. Spoken By Nell Gwyn, When She Was To Be Carried Off Dead By The Bearers.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
They who have best succeeded on the stage
Page No:
pp.46-47
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Conquest of Granada.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A poet once the spartans led to fight
Page No:
p.48
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Amboyna.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A pretty task and so I told the fool
Page No:
pp.49-50
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Aureng-Zebe.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Poets like disputants when reasons fail
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
Epilogue To All For Love Or, The World Well Lost.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I beg a boon that ere you all disband
Page No:
pp.52-55
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Limberham. Spoken By Limberham.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
What Sophocles could undertake alone
Page No:
pp.53-54
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Oedipus.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
These cursed critics put me in a passion
Page No:
pp.55-56
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Troilus And Cressida, Spoken By Thersites.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
There's none I'm sure who is a friend to love
Page No:
pp.56-57
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Spanish Fryar.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Much time and trouble this poor play has cost
Page No:
pp.58-59
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Duke of Guise. Spoken By Mrs. Cook.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
After our Aesop's fable shown today
Page No:
pp.60-61
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Albion And Albanius. Written In The Reign Of James II.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I quaked at heart for fear the royal fashion
Page No:
pp.61-62
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Don Sebastian. Spoken Betwixt Antonio and Morayma.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I'm thinking and it almost makes me mad
Page No:
pp.63-64
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Amphitryon. Spoken By Phaedra.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
This day the poet bloodily inclined
Page No:
pp.64-65
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Cleomenes; Or, The Spartan Hero. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle, Who Performed The Part Of Cleora.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I've had today a dozen billet doux
Page No:
pp.66-67
Poem Title:
Epilogue To King Arthur, An Opera. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle, In The Character Of Emmeline.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now in good manners nothing should be said
Page No:
pp.68-69
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love Triumphant. Spoken By Mrs. Mountfort, Who Performed The Part Of Dalinda.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Though what our prologue said was sadly true
Page No:
pp.69-71
Poem Title:
Epilogue. Spoken At The Opening Of The New House, March 26, 1674.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As Jupiter I made my court in vain
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Intended To Have Been Spoken By The Lady Hen. Mar. Wentworth, Who Performed The Part Of Jupiter, When Callisto Was Acted At Court.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Most modern wits such monstrous fools have shown
Page No:
pp.73-74
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Man Of Mode: Or, Sir Fopling Flutter, By Sir George Etheridge, 1761.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
You've seen a pair of faithful lovers die
Page No:
pp.74-75
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Mithridates, King of Pontus, By Mr. N. Lee, 1678.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Ladies the beardless author of this day
Page No:
pp.75-76
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Tamerlane The Great. By Mr. Saunders, 1681. Spoken By An Actress.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
We act by fits and starts like drowning men
Page No:
pp.77-78
Poem Title:
Epilogue For The King's House.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A virgin poet was served up today
Page No:
pp.78-80
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Loyal Brother: Or, The Persian Prince, By Mr. Southerne, 1682.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Oft has our poet wished this happy seat
Page No:
pp.80-81
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken At Oxford, By Mrs. Marshall.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
No poor Dutch peasant winged with all his fear
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The University Of Oxford. Spoken By Mr. Hart, At The Acting Of The Silent Woman.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Our hero's happy in the play's conclusion
Page No:
pp.83-85
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Constantine The Great, By Mr. N. Lee, 1684.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
New ministers when first they get in place
Page No:
pp.85-87
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The King And Queen, Upon The Union Of The Two Companies, In 1686.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
You saw our wife was chaste yet thoroughly tried
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
An Epilogue, [The Play Not Named.]
Attribution:
Dryden [on p. 87] Southerne [on p. 195]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Like some raw sophister that mounts the pulpit
Page No:
pp.89-90
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Husband His Own Cuckold, By Mr. John Dryden, Junior, 1696.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Perhaps the parson stretched a point too far
Page No:
pp.91-92
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Pilgrim.
Attribution:
Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
If mighty sir your goodness will do grace
Page No:
p.93
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Siege Of Rhodes. Addressed To The King, At Whitehall.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Though bashfully we fear to give offence
Page No:
p.94
Poem Title:
Second Epilogue To The Same.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
What ere I shift my clothes can he not stay
Page No:
p.95
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Villain.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Too late we told you some two hours ago
Page No:
pp.96-97
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The First Day's Entertainment At Rutland-House, By Declamations And Music, After The Manner Of The Ancients.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Since you at land no more can hurried be
Page No:
pp.97-98
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Play-House To Be Lett.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Our poet in his fury hath professed
Page No:
p.99
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Unfortunate Lovers.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
I am so constant to you gentlemen
Page No:
pp.100-101
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Same. Spoken At The Duke's Theatre.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
The office of an epilogue is now
Page No:
p.100
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Wits. Spoken At Black-Friars.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Ladies who fine as fi'pence are
Page No:
pp.102-105
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Man's The Master. In A Ballad, Sung By Two.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Troth gentlemen you must vouchsafe a while
Page No:
p.102
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love And Honour.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
Unto the masculine I can afford
Page No:
p.105
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Platonic Lovers.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
For your own sakes dear hearts you had not best
Page No:
p.106
Poem Title:
Epilogue To News From Plymouth. Spoken By Sir Furious Inland.
Attribution:
Sir William Davenant.
Attributed To:
Sir William Davenant
First Line:
The fierce Melantius was content you see
Page No:
p.107
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Maid's Tragedy Altered. Spoken By The Person Who Acted The King.
Attribution:
Waller.
Attributed To:
Edmund Waller
First Line:
The play great sir is done yet we need fear
Page No:
p.108
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Guardian. Spoken Before The Prince, Afterwards Charles II.
Attribution:
Cowley.
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
Methinks a vision bids me silence break
Page No:
p.109
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Cutter Of Coleman-Street. Spoken By The Person Who Acted Cutter.
Attribution:
Cowley.
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
The madness of your people and the rage
Page No:
p.110
Poem Title:
Second Epilogue To The Same. Spoken At Court.
Attribution:
Cowley.
Attributed To:
Abraham Cowley
First Line:
Sir Frederic now I am revenged of you
Page No:
pp.111-112
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love In A Tub. Spoken By The Widow.
Attribution:
Sir George Etherege.
Attributed To:
Sir George Etherege
First Line:
Thrice happy they that never writ before
Page No:
pp.112-113
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Theodosius; Or, The Force Of Love.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
What is this wit which Cowley could not name
Page No:
p.114
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Princess Of Cleve.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
No cringing sirs the poet's champion I
Page No:
pp.115-116
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Lucius Junius Brutus. Spoken By Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Well then be you his judges what pretence
Page No:
pp.117-118
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Caesar Borgia.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
To this learned audience gladly we submit
Page No:
pp.118-119
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sophonisba. Spoken By Sophonisba, At Its Exhibition At Oxford.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
How dull how grave and how precise ye sit
Page No:
p.120
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Tragedy Of Nero.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Your servant gentlemen tis a long time
Page No:
pp.121-122
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Gloriana; Or, The Court Of Augustus Caesar. Spoken By Mr. Haynes.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
Whatever they mean yet ought they to be cursed
Page No:
pp.122-124
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Rival Queens; Or, Alexander The Great.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
How wise they are that can with patience bear
Page No:
pp.124-126
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Massacre Of Paris.
Attribution:
Lee.
Attributed To:
Nathaniel Lee
First Line:
The banished cavaliers a roving blade
Page No:
pp.126-127
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The First Part Of The Rover; Or, The Banish'd Cavaliers.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Poets are kings of wit and you appear
Page No:
pp.128-129
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Second Part Of The Rover.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Hiss them and cry them down tis all in vain
Page No:
pp.129-130
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Dutch Lover.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
The vizor's off and now I dare appear
Page No:
pp.130-132
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Round-Heads; Or, The Good Old Cause. Spoken By Lady Desbro.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
With late success being blessed I'm come again
Page No:
pp.132-133
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Abdelazer; Or, The Moor's Revenge. Spoken By Little Mrs. Ariell.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
After our showing play of mighty pains
Page No:
pp.133-135
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Young King. Spoken By Mrs. Barry.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
My plot I fear will take but with a few
Page No:
pp.135-136
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The City Heiress.
Attribution:
Written By A Person Of Quality: Spoken By Mrs. Boteler.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
So hard the times are and so thin the town
Page No:
pp.137-138
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Feign'd Courtezans.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Sir Timothy gallants at last is come
Page No:
pp.138-139
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Town-Fop. Spoken By Sir Timothy Tawdrey.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
I come not a petitioner to sue
Page No:
pp.139-141
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The False Count.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Long have we turned the point of our just rage
Page No:
pp.141-143
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Lucky Chance.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
We charged you boldly in our first advance
Page No:
p.143
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Forced Marriage. Spoken By A Woman.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
I here and there overheard a coxcomb cry
Page No:
pp.144-145
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sir Patient Fancy. Spoken By Mrs. E. Guyn.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Gallants you have so long been absent hence
Page No:
pp.146-147
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Widow Ranter.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
With our old plays as with old wife it fares
Page No:
pp.147-148
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Emperor Of The Moon.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Ladies the prince was kind at last
Page No:
pp.149-150
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Amorous Prince. Spoken By Cloris.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
We're grown impatient to be out of pain
Page No:
pp.150-151
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Younger Brother.
Attribution:
Mrs. Behn.
Attributed To:
Aphra Behn
First Line:
Physicians tell us that in every age
Page No:
p.152
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Sullen Lovers.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
The mighty prince of poets learned Ben
Page No:
pp.153-154
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Humourists.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
As a young merchant who had scaped of late
Page No:
pp.154-155
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Royal Shepherdess.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Now you who think you are judges of the pit
Page No:
pp.155-157
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Virtuoso.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Whatever the poet has deserved from you
Page No:
pp.157-158
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Psyche.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Through all the perils of the play I've run
Page No:
pp.159-160
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Libertine. Spoken By Jacomo.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
A play without a wedding made in spite
Page No:
pp.161-162
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Epsom-Wells.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
If there were hopes that ancient solid wit
Page No:
pp.162-163
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Timon Of Athens.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
When sieges now by poets are prepared
Page No:
pp.164-165
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Miser.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
In troubled times like these the ancients chose
Page No:
pp.165-166
Poem Title:
Epilogue To A True Widow.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
A skilful mistress uses wondrous art
Page No:
pp.166-167
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Lancashire Witches. Spoken By Mrs. Barry And Teague.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Who dares deny the poet his applause
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Woman-Captain. Spoken By Mrs. Barry, Who Acted The Woman-Captain.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Ye mighty scourers of these narrow seas
Page No:
pp.169-170
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Squire Of Alsatia.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
I was our author's advocate last year
Page No:
pp.171-172
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Bury Fair. Spoken By Mrs. Mountford.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Methinks I hear some ladies nicely wise
Page No:
pp.172-174
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Amorous Bigot. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Now lady mothers you who frown today
Page No:
pp.174-176
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Scowrers.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
Enough of mirth the sportive scene is done
Page No:
pp.176-177
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Volunteers. Spoken By One In Deep Mourning.
Attribution:
Shadwell
Attributed To:
Thomas Shadwell
First Line:
To you the judges learned in stage laws
Page No:
pp.178-179
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Plain Dealer. Spoken By The Widow Blackacre.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Now you the vigorous who daily here
Page No:
pp.179-180
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Country-Wife. Spoken By Mrs. Knep.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
The ladies first I am to compliment
Page No:
pp.181-182
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Gentleman Dancing-Master. Spoken By Flirt.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Now my brisk brothers of the pit you'll say
Page No:
p.183
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love In A Wood. Spoken By Dapperwit.
Attribution:
Wycherley.
Attributed To:
William Wycherley
First Line:
Now who says poets don't in blood delight
Page No:
p.184
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Alcibiades. Sopken [sic] By Mrs. Mary Lee.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Now what do ye think my message hither means
Page No:
p.185
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Don Carlos, Prince of Spain. Spoken By A Girl.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
How little do you guess what I'm to say
Page No:
pp.186-187
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Titus And Berenice. With A Farce Call'd The Cheats Of Scapin. Spoken By Mrs. Mary Lee, When She Was Out Of Humour.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Well sirs if now my spouse and I should part
Page No:
pp.188-189
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Friendship In Fashion. Spoken By Mrs. Barrey.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
With the discharge of passions much oppressed
Page No:
pp.189-190
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Soldier's Fortune.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
It is not long since in the noisy pit
Page No:
pp.191-192
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Atheist; Or The Second Part Of The Soldier's Fortune.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
You've seen one orphan ruined here and I
Page No:
pp.192-193
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Venice Preserv'd.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
The text is done and now for application
Page No:
pp.193-194
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Venice Preserv'd.
Attribution:
Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
If novelty has any charms to move
Page No:
pp.196-197
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Sir Antony Love. Spoken By Mrs. Botelar.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
My character not being much in vogue
Page No:
pp.198-199
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Wives Excuse. Spoken By Mrs. Friendall.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
See the effects of a poor maid's last prayer
Page No:
pp.199-200
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Maid's Last Prayer.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Now tell me when you saw the lady die
Page No:
pp.201-202
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Fatal Marriage. Spoken By Mrs. Verbruggen.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
You see we try all shapes and shifts and arts
Page No:
pp.202-203
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Oroonoko. Spoken By Mrs. Verbruggen.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Poets fine titles for themselves may find
Page No:
pp.203-205
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Fate of Capua.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Our author's muse a numerous issue boasts
Page No:
pp.205-206
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Spartan Dame.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Well you have seen my future spouse and me
Page No:
pp.207-208
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Money The Mistres. Spoken By Mariana.
Attribution:
Southerne
Attributed To:
Thomas Southerne
First Line:
Our bard shall end tonight as he began
Page No:
pp.208-209
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Iphigenia.
Attribution:
Dennis.
Attributed To:
John Dennis
First Line:
Thus have we shown what we proposed to show
Page No:
pp.209-210
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Liberty Asserted.
Attribution:
Dennis.
Attributed To:
John Dennis
First Line:
Well sirs you've seen Virginia die ye powers
Page No:
pp.211-212
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Appius And Virginia.
Attribution:
Dennis.
Attributed To:
John Dennis
First Line:
The female author who recites today
Page No:
pp.212-214
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Lucius. Spoken By Mrs. Horton.
Attribution:
Prior.
Attributed To:
Matthew Prior
First Line:
The spleen vapours and this doleful play
Page No:
pp.214-215
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Ambitious Step-Mother. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Too well we saw what must have been our fate
Page No:
pp.216-217
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Tamerlane. Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
You see the tripping dame could find no favour
Page No:
pp.218-219
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Fair Penitent. Spoken By Lavinia.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Just going to take water at the stairs
Page No:
pp.219-220
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Ulysses.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
The business of the day being now gone through
Page No:
pp.221-222
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Royal Convert. Spoken By Ethelinda.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Ye modest matrons all ye virtuous wives
Page No:
pp.222-213
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Jane Shore. Spoken By Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
The palms of virtue heroes oft have worn
Page No:
pp.224-225
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Lady Jane Gray.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
From Fletcher's great original today
Page No:
pp.225-226
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Inconstant.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
As some brave knight who once with spear and shield
Page No:
pp.227-228
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love For Love. Spoken By Mrs. Barry And Mrs. Bracegirdle For Mr. Betterton's Benefit, April 7, 1709.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Well twas a narrow scape my lover made
Page No:
pp.229-230
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Cruel Gift. Spoken By Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Rowe.
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
What will the galleries nay boxes say
Page No:
pp.231-232
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Heroic Love.
Attribution:
Lansdowne.
Attributed To:
George Granville
First Line:
Each in his turn the poet and the priest
Page No:
pp.233-234
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Jew Of Venice.
Attribution:
Lansdowne.
Attributed To:
George Granville
First Line:
I who have been the poet's spark to day
Page No:
p.233
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Once A Lover; And Always A Lover. Spoken By Angelica.
Attribution:
Lansdowne.
Attributed To:
George Granville
First Line:
Now gallants for the author first to you
Page No:
pp.235-236
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love's Last Shift. Spoken By Miss Cross, Who Sung Cupid.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
An epilogue's a tax on authors laid
Page No:
pp.236-237
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love Makes A Man.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Mongst all the rules the ancients had in vogue
Page No:
pp.237-238
Poem Title:
Epilogue To She Wou'd, And She Wou'd Not.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Conquest and freedom are at length our own
Page No:
pp.239-240
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Careless Husband.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Hold hold sir Bullock you must stay dear rogue
Page No:
pp.241-243
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Rival Fools. Spoken By Mr. Pinkethman and Mr. Bullock.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Well sirs I know not how the play may pass
Page No:
pp.243-244
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Double Gallant.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Well sirs | I'm come to tell you that my fears are over
Page No:
pp.245-246
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Heroic Daughter. Spoken By Ximena.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
How wild how frantic is the vain essay
Page No:
pp.247-248
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Non-Juror. Spoken By Maria.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
The time is come the Roman bard foretold
Page No:
pp.249-250
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Refusal.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Methinks I hear some powdered critics say
Page No:
pp.250-252
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Provok'd Husband.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Since songs to plays are nowadays
Page No:
pp.252-253
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love In A Riddle. Sung By Aegon.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Well sirs you've seen a prodigy today
Page No:
pp.254-255
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Perolla And Izadora. Spoken By Mrs. Oldfield.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Was it not bold from stated rules to rove
Page No:
pp.255-256
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Caesar In Egypt.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Of all the helps for wit so much in vogue
Page No:
pp.257-258
Poem Title:
Epilogue to King John.
Attribution:
Cibber.
Attributed To:
Colley Cibber
First Line:
Gentlemen and ladies | these people have regaled you here today
Page No:
pp.259-260
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Relapse. Spoken By Lord Foppington.
Attribution:
Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
No epilogue I swear I know of none
Page No:
pp.261-262
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Provoked Wife. Spoken By Lady Brute And Belinda.
Attribution:
Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
What say you sirs do ye think my lady'll scape
Page No:
pp.262-263
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The False Friend. Spoken By Jacintha.
Attribution:
Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
I've heard wise men in politics lay down
Page No:
pp.263-264
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Confederacy. Spoken By Clarissa.
Attribution:
Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
I'm thinking now good husbands are so few
Page No:
pp.265-266
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Mistake. Spoken By Isabella.
Attribution:
Vanbrugh
Attributed To:
Sir John Vanbrugh
First Line:
As a rash girl who will all hazards run
Page No:
pp.266-267
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Old Batchelor.
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Could poets but foresee how plays would take
Page No:
pp.268-269
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Double Dealer.
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Sure providence at first designed this place
Page No:
pp.269-271
Poem Title:
Epilogue To Love For Love. Spoken At The Opening Of The New House, By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
The tragedy thus done I am you know
Page No:
pp.271-272
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Mourning Bride. Spoken By Almeira.
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
After our epilogue this crowd dismisses
Page No:
pp.272-273
Poem Title:
Epilogue To The Way Of The World.
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Whatever future fate our house may find
Page No:
pp.274-275
Poem Title:
Epilogue At The Opening Of The Queen's Theatre In The Hay-Market, With An Italian Pastoral: Spoken By Mrs. Bracegirdle.
Attribution:
Congreve.
Attributed To:
William Congreve