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Poems on affairs of state [vol. II] [T125689]

DMI number:
129
Aliases
Poems on affairs of state
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Evidence:
Publication Date:
1703
Volume Number:
2 of 2
ESTC number:
T125689
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW105247328
Shelfmark:
BOD Douce P 465
Full Title:
POEMS | ON | [g]Affairs of State.[/g] | FROM | The Reign of K. [i]James[/i] the First, | To this Present Year 1703. | Written by the Greatest Wits of the Age, | [i]VIZ[/i]. | [2 cols.] [col. 1]The Duke of [i]Bucking- | ham[/i]. | The Earl of [i]Rochester[/i]. | The Earl of [i]D----t[/i]. | Lord [i]J-----s[/i]. | Mr. [i]Milton[/i]. | Mr. [i]Marvel[/i]. | Mr. [i]St. J--n[/i].[/col. 1] [col. 2]Mr. [i]John Dryden[/i]. | Dr. [i]G--th[/i]. | Mr. [i]Toland[/i]. | Mr. [i]Hughes[/i]. | Mr. [i]F--e[/i]. | Mr. [i]Finch[/i]. | Mr. [i]Harcourt[/i]. | Mr. [i]T------n[/i], &c.[/col. 2] | [rule] | [i]Many of which never before Publish'd[/i]. | [rule] | Vol. II. | [rule] | Printed in the Year 1703.
Place of Publication:
[London]
Genres:
Political miscellany
Format:
Octavo
Pagination:
i-xii, 1-471 [1].
Bibliographic details:
Mispagination: Pp.42 and 49 misnumbered 44 and 4 respectively.
Other matter:
Short preface highlights volume as second vol of POAS, apologises for poems not being in chronological order. Declares political impartiality and claims historical value for poems. Finally suggests that the volume saves readers the charge and expense of collecting their own poems. Followed by 'A Table of all the POEMS contain'd in this Second Volume.'
Related Miscellanies
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [Vol. II] [T121816]
Publication Date:
1703
ESTC No:
T121816
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [vol I] [T108847]
Publication Date:
1702
ESTC No:
T108847
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [vol. I] [T144919]
Publication Date:
1703
ESTC No:
T144919 [vol. I]
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
A collection of poems on affairs of state [ESTC R23725]
Publication Date:
1689
ESTC No:
R23725
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
A new collection of poems relating to state affairs [N5917]
Publication Date:
1705
ESTC No:
N5917
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [vol. I] [N12193 part 1]
Publication Date:
1716
ESTC No:
N12193
Volume:
1 of 4
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [vol. I] [T144920 part 1]
Publication Date:
1710
ESTC No:
T144920
Volume:
1 of 4
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [vol. II] [N12192]
Publication Date:
1703
ESTC No:
N12192
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [Vol. II] [T144917]
Publication Date:
1716
ESTC No:
T144917
Volume:
2 of 4
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [vol. III] [T144915]
Publication Date:
1704
ESTC No:
T144915
Volume:
3 of 3
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [Vol. III] [T144918]
Publication Date:
1716
ESTC No:
T144918
Volume:
3 of 4
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [Vol. IV] [N12191]
Publication Date:
1716
ESTC No:
N12191
Volume:
4 of 4
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on affairs of state [vol. IV] [T144916]
Publication Date:
1707
ESTC No:
T144916
Volume:
4 of 4
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
State poems continued from the time of O. Cromwell to the year 1697 [T144983]
Publication Date:
1703
ESTC No:
T144983
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The second part of the collection of poems on affairs of state [ESTC R10478]
Publication Date:
1689
ESTC No:
R10478
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The third part of the collection of poems on affairs of state [R22081]
Publication Date:
1689
ESTC No:
R22081
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Long time had Israel been disused from rest
Page No:
pp.1-6
Poem Title:
The Foreigners.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Speak satire for there's none can tell like thee
Page No:
pp.14-46
Poem Title:
The true-born englishman: a satyr
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In Aesop's new-made world of wit
Page No:
pp.48-49
Poem Title:
Fab. I. Fair warning
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A dunghill cock was raking in the ground
Page No:
p.49
Poem Title:
Fab. II. The cock and pearl
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A horse and ass were journeying on their way
Page No:
pp.49-50
Poem Title:
Fab. III. Of the horse and the ass
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A wolf complained that he had lost a lamb
Page No:
pp.50-51
Poem Title:
Fab. IV. Of the judgement of the ape
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A fierce wild boar of monstrous size and force
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
Fab. V. Of the horse and man
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Two welshmen partners in a cow
Page No:
pp.53-54
Poem Title:
Fab. VI. The bargain
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Two fierce young bulls within the marshes strove
Page No:
pp.54-55
Poem Title:
Fab. VII. The Frogs Concern.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A wretched churl was travelling with his ass
Page No:
pp.55-56
Poem Title:
Fab. VIII. Of a man and his ass
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A wolf retiring from Whitehall
Page No:
p.56
Poem Title:
Fab. IX. Of a wolf
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Two travellers an oyster found
Page No:
pp.56-57
Poem Title:
Fab. X. The plaintiff and the defendant
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The hawks were once at mortal jars
Page No:
pp.57-58
Poem Title:
Fab. XI. Of the Pigeons.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A hare did once into a garden get
Page No:
pp.58-60
Poem Title:
Fab. XII. The farmer and the hare
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A youth of pregnant parts and wit
Page No:
p.60
Poem Title:
Fab. XIII. Poetry its Cure.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An aged fox that ravaged woods and plains
Page No:
pp.61-62
Poem Title:
Fab. I. The fox and the poultry
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A labouring swain had been at work
Page No:
pp.63-64
Poem Title:
Fab. II. The poor man and the devil
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A badger once did ravage all the fields
Page No:
pp.64-65
Poem Title:
Fab. III. The farmer and the badger
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A lusty horse not long ago
Page No:
pp.65-67
Poem Title:
Fab. IV. The ravens and the crows
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The mighty Puss not long since ruled the state
Page No:
p.67
Poem Title:
Fab. V. The Summons.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The morning come the slaves await
Page No:
pp.68-69
Poem Title:
Fab. VI. The interview
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A generous race of croaking frogs
Page No:
pp.69-70
Poem Title:
Fab. VII. The frogs concern
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A youthful lion in the wood
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
Fab. VIII. The lion and fox
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A mighty weasel of renown
Page No:
pp.72-73
Poem Title:
Fab. IX. The Weesil, Rats and Mice
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A land there is as maps do tell
Page No:
pp.74-75
Poem Title:
Fab. X. Lubberland
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A hawk that of yore
Page No:
p.75
Poem Title:
Fab. XI. The hawk and birds
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The princes once did all combine
Page No:
p.76
Poem Title:
Fab. XII. The asylum
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Once on a time the hands and feet
Page No:
pp.77-78
Poem Title:
Fab. XIII. Of the other members conspiring against the belly
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A certain brewer whose liquor of life
Page No:
p.78
Poem Title:
Fab. XIV. The fable of the spunge
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Aesop overcome with wind and spleen
Page No:
pp.79-80
Poem Title:
Fab. XV. Esop sent to bedlam
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A wanton sloven of a priest
Page No:
pp.80-81
Poem Title:
Fab. XVI. The priest and pears
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A fierce dispute betwixt birds of night
Page No:
pp.81-82
Poem Title:
Fab. XVII. The owl and the bat
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Two sharpers once to gaming fell
Page No:
pp.83-84
Poem Title:
Fab. XVIII. The sharpers and cullies
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A half famished wolf met a jolly fat dog
Page No:
pp.84-85
Poem Title:
Fab. XIX. The wolf and the dog
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
An apple fallen from a tree
Page No:
pp.85-86
Poem Title:
Fab. XX. Of the apple and the horse-turd
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A welshman from his hills come down
Page No:
p.86
Poem Title:
Fab. XXI. The pump
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Cold Muscovy as story tells
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
Fab. XXII. Of the bear and the bees
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There was a monarch whose imperial sway
Page No:
pp.88-92
Poem Title:
Fab. XXIII. The devil and the priest
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A milk white rogue immortal and unhanged
Page No:
pp.92-93
Poem Title:
Fab. XXIV. The courtier
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Religion is a thing if understood
Page No:
pp.93-96
Poem Title:
Fab. XXV. The pilgrims
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There was an eagle built his nest
Page No:
pp.96-100
Poem Title:
Fab. XXVI. The confederacy
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A mighty lion heretofore
Page No:
pp.100-101
Poem Title:
Fab. XXVII. The lions treaty of partition
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A wealthy matron now grown old
Page No:
pp.101-102
Poem Title:
Fab. XXVII. The blind woman and her doctors
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Five satyrs of the woodland sort
Page No:
pp.102-104
Poem Title:
Fab. XXIX. The satyrs address
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There dwelt a farmer in the west
Page No:
pp.104-105
Poem Title:
Fab. XXX. The farmer and his dog
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
And since men wandering in a wood by night
Page No:
pp.105-108
Poem Title:
A copy of verses written in the year 1623. relating to many things that would happen to the government of England
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
God hath a controversy with our land
Page No:
pp.108-113
Poem Title:
Another copy of verses by the same author, written in 1628
Attribution:
Another copy of verses by the same author
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all the grain our nation yields
Page No:
pp.113-115
Poem Title:
A panegyrick upon Oates.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Roundhead | In parem imperium habet par
Page No:
pp.115-118
Poem Title:
Roundhead
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What the priests gospel call
Page No:
pp.118-119
Poem Title:
Song
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My tap is run then Baxter tell me why
Page No:
pp.119-122
Poem Title:
The last will and testament of Anthony K. of Poland
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Nan and Frank two quondam friends
Page No:
pp.122-127
Poem Title:
The combat
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Worthy Sir | Though weaned from all those scandalous delights
Page No:
pp.127-128
Poem Title:
Letter.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
From the deep vaulted den of endless night
Page No:
pp.128-131
Poem Title:
Rochester's ghost addressing it self to the secretary of the muses
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Dear Friend | When those we love are in distress
Page No:
pp.132-133
Poem Title:
A consolatory epistle to Julian in his confinement
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
No longer blame those on the banks of Nile
Page No:
pp.133-134
Poem Title:
A riddle
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Dear Julian twice or thrice a year
Page No:
pp.135-137
Poem Title:
To Julian.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sir | all my endeavours all my hopes depend
Page No:
pp.138-143
Poem Title:
A satyr upon the poets, being a translation out of the 7th satyr of Juvenal
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Here take this W--- spread it up and down
Page No:
pp.143-146
Poem Title:
Letter to C----- W
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If Afra's worth were needful to be shown
Page No:
pp.146-148
Poem Title:
The Female Laureat
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since by just flames the guilty piece is lost
Page No:
pp.149-151
Poem Title:
Advice to the painter, upon the defeat of the rebels in the west, and the execution of the late D. of Monmouth
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all the plagues mankind possess
Page No:
pp.152-156
Poem Title:
Madam le Croy
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A session of lovers was held the other day
Page No:
pp.156-165
Poem Title:
The Lover's Session, in imitation of Sir John Suckling's session of poets
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How liberty of conscience that's a change
Page No:
pp.166-167
Poem Title:
Doctor Wild's ghost, on his majesty's declaration for liberty of conscience
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Damon the author of so great renown
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
The Renegado Poet.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since plagues were ordered for a scourge to men
Page No:
pp.168-178
Poem Title:
The tribe of Levi
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Clito the wise the generous and good
Page No:
pp.179-186
Poem Title:
Clito: a poem on the force of eloquence.
Attribution:
By Mr. Toland
Attributed To:
John Toland
First Line:
The husband's the pilot the wife is the ocean
Page No:
pp.187-188
Poem Title:
Some verses sent by a friend to one who twice ventur'd his carcase in marriage
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
You ladies all of merry England
Page No:
pp.188-191
Poem Title:
Signior Dildoe, by the Earl of Rochester, 1678
Attribution:
by the Earl of Rochester, 1678
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
Tis the Arabian bird alone
Page No:
p.191.00
Poem Title:
The encouragement
Attribution:
by the E. of Rochester
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
In all humility we crave
Page No:
p.192
Poem Title:
The commons petition to the king,
Attribution:
by the E. of Rochester
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
Preserved by wonder in the oak O Charles
Page No:
pp.192-194
Poem Title:
A Satyr by the Lord Rochester, which King Charles took out of his Pocket.
Attribution:
by the Lord Rochester,
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
Here lies a horse beneath this stone
Page No:
pp.195-196
Poem Title:
An epitaph upon a stumbling-horse
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all the cheats and shams that have of late
Page No:
pp.197-202
Poem Title:
Ad populum phalerae: or the twin-shams
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When people find their money spent
Page No:
pp.203-210
Poem Title:
The Campaign, 1692.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A thin ill natured ghost that haunts the king
Page No:
pp.211-213
Poem Title:
A satyr written when the K--- went to Flanders, and left nine Lord Justices
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
About the time that I shall be
Page No:
pp.213-214
Poem Title:
A prophecy which hath been in a manuscript in the Lord Powis's family above sixty years
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Here lies a creature of indulgent fate
Page No:
p.215
Poem Title:
An epitaph upon the E. of Ro---ster's being dismist from the treasury in 1687,
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Unhappy I who once ordained did bear
Page No:
pp.215-216
Poem Title:
King James to himself,
Attribution:
by Mr. D----n
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I sing the praise of a worthy knight
Page No:
pp.216-218
Poem Title:
On the Duke of Bucks
Attribution:
by Mr. D----n
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
See Britons see one half before your eyes
Page No:
pp.218-219
Poem Title:
Prologue for Sir John Falstaff, rising slowly to soft musick
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Humbly sheweth | Should you order Tom Brown
Page No:
pp.220-221
Poem Title:
To the lords assembled in council: the petition of Tho. Brown
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Great truckling soul whose stubborn honesty
Page No:
pp.221-223
Poem Title:
To Mr. Dryden, upon his declaring himself a Roman Catholick.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In vain the harassed people strive
Page No:
pp.223-224
Poem Title:
Upon Mr. Neal's projecting new taxes
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Some say a physician of late
Page No:
pp.224-226
Poem Title:
Doctor Hannes dissected, in a familiar epistle by way of nosce teipsum
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With the sad tidings of the day oppressed
Page No:
pp.227-229
Poem Title:
A poem on the death of his highness the Duke of Gloucester
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of kings renowned and mighty bards I write
Page No:
pp.229-235
Poem Title:
A description of Mr. Dryden's funeral
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Three doctors of late
Page No:
pp.236-238
Poem Title:
A melancholy theme on a dismal disaster, in a grubstreet poem, by grubstreet poetaster
Attribution:
by grubstreet poetaster
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now Lewis all thy numerous trophies boast
Page No:
pp.239-240
Poem Title:
A Comparison betwixt Lewis XIV. and Prince Eugene
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Cy gist icy Charles roy d'Espagne
Page No:
p.240
Poem Title:
An epitaph on the late king of Spain
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In Aesop's tales an honest wretch we find
Page No:
p.241
Poem Title:
A fable
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye Patriots go on
Page No:
pp.241-245
Poem Title:
The patriots. Writ about the year 1700
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Your M------ves Cl---is H---lys F--y's Lowthers
Page No:
pp.245-247
Poem Title:
On squire Neal's projects
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When envy does at Athens rise
Page No:
p.247
Poem Title:
On some Votes against the Lord S.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye vile traducers of the female kind
Page No:
pp.248-250
Poem Title:
The confederates: or, the first happy day of the island princess
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I told you sir it would not pass
Page No:
pp.251-254
Poem Title:
A dialogue between poet Motteux and patron Henningham
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
O Harry canst thou find no subject fit
Page No:
pp.255-257
Poem Title:
A letter from J. P. to Colonel H. occasion'd by the Colonel's two late letters
Attribution:
A Letter from J. P.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
And hast thou left old Jemmy in the lurch
Page No:
pp.258-261
Poem Title:
A satyr upon the French king. Writ after the peace was concluded at Reswick, anno 1697.
Attribution:
By a non-swearing parson, and said to be drop'd out of his pocket at Sam's Coffee-House
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
One fatal day a sympathetic fire
Page No:
p.261
Poem Title:
On Madam Mohun and Mr. Congreve's sickness
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Fortune made up of toys and impudence
Page No:
pp.262-263
Poem Title:
On fortune,
Attribution:
by the Duke of Buckingham
Attributed To:
George Villiers
First Line:
Second to Jove alone in whom unite
Page No:
p.262
Poem Title:
Engrav'd on a medal of the French king's
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
The gods are not more blessed than he
Page No:
p.263
Poem Title:
On Madam Behn
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Good people what will you of all be bereft
Page No:
p.264
Poem Title:
A song on the taxes, 1696
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In council wise in war so great a man
Page No:
p.265
Poem Title:
To King William
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When the bold Carthaginian
Page No:
p.265
Poem Title:
Regulus's death by Carthage two ways
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As fair Olinda sat beneath a shady tree
Page No:
p.266
Poem Title:
Cure for green sickness, 1702
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Would you know if I should change my life
Page No:
p.266
Poem Title:
Martial. Lib. 1 Epig. 58
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What fast and pray
Page No:
p.267
Poem Title:
Found on the church-door at Whitehall, January 30. 1696
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Not attributed
First Line:
William the third lies here the almighty's friend
Page No:
p.267
Poem Title:
Epitaph on King William, 1702
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A late expedition to Oxford was made
Page No:
pp.268-270
Poem Title:
On the Lord Lovelace's coming to Oxford from Glocester goal in December 168
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In a dark silent shady grove
Page No:
pp.271-272
Poem Title:
Another.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Talk Strephon no more of what's honest and just
Page No:
p.271
Poem Title:
A song
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Woman thou worst of all church-plagues farewell
Page No:
p.272
Poem Title:
On the divorces by Parliament, 1701
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
When a knight of the north is lopped in axe yard
Page No:
p.273
Poem Title:
Some verses found in the ruins of the privy garden, which were carried to the gentleman usher, written in a scroll of parchment
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Renowned Blake what trumpet may be found
Page No:
pp.274-290
Poem Title:
The life and actions of Robert Blake Esq; general of the fleets of the Commonwealth of England, from the year 1649. to 1657. when he died in Plimouth Sound much lamented
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Such has been this ill-natured nation's fate
Page No:
pp.293-308
Poem Title:
The mock mourners. A satyr, by way of elegy on King William
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Midst pretty tricks and quaint device
Page No:
pp.309-311
Poem Title:
The Whim, dedicated to two Kings, that of Madrid and that of St. Germains.
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Fulmine Caesaro fretus Jovis Ales ab alto
Page No:
p.311
Poem Title:
[no title]
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First Line:
From parting clouds the German eagle brings
Page No:
p.312
Poem Title:
On the descent of the Germans from the Alps to Verona and their ascent from the aquaduct into Cremona
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Not attributed
First Line:
Today a mighty hero comes to warm
Page No:
pp.312-313
Poem Title:
A prologue designed for Tamerlane, but never spoke.
Attribution:
Written by Dr. G---th
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
See thou disturber of the world's repose
Page No:
pp.313-314
Poem Title:
To the French King
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How long must the restorer of our state
Page No:
pp.315-317
Poem Title:
On King William
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Attributed To:
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First Line:
As in a dream our thinking monarch lay
Page No:
pp.317-319
Poem Title:
The ghost of K. C------ II. Written about the year 1692
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Not attributed
First Line:
In sable weeds your beaux and belles appear
Page No:
p.320
Poem Title:
The mourners: found in the streets, 1702
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ye English nations put your mourning on
Page No:
pp.320-321
Poem Title:
The counterpart
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First Line:
Here lie the relics of a martyred knight
Page No:
p.321
Poem Title:
On Sir John Fenwick
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First Line:
Whither ye impious Britons do ye run
Page No:
pp.322-323
Poem Title:
An allusion to the 7th Epode of Horace, 1690. Quo, quo scelesti ruitis, &c.
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Illustrious steed who should give the zodiac grace
Page No:
p.323
Poem Title:
On S-----l
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Last year in the spring the life of the king
Page No:
p.324
Poem Title:
A song, 1696
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Goddess of numbers and of thoughts sublime
Page No:
pp.325-337
Poem Title:
The house of Nassau. A pindarick ode
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How long may heaven be bantered by a nation
Page No:
pp.340-374
Poem Title:
Reformation of manners, a satyr
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Near to the Rose where punks in numbers flock
Page No:
pp.374-377
Poem Title:
The Play-House: A Satyr.
Attribution:
By T. G. Gent
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
On my hard fate as late I pondering lay
Page No:
pp.378-387
Poem Title:
The dream, to Sir Charles Duncomb
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
For tyrants dead no statues we erect
Page No:
pp.387-395
Poem Title:
The british muse: or, tyranny expos'd. A satyr, occasion'd by all the fulsom and lying poems and elegies, that have been written of the death of the late King James
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
For the miracles done
Page No:
pp.395-396
Poem Title:
On the Promoted Bishops. 1691.
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A number of pr-----s though poor ones 'tis true
Page No:
pp.397-398
Poem Title:
A ballad on the confederates; in imitation of Ratcliffe Ramble
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Cursed be the stars which did ordain
Page No:
pp.398-399
Poem Title:
Curse, 1690
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First Line:
When J---- and his army shall run from the Boyne
Page No:
pp.399-400
Poem Title:
Answer to the prophecy, as when the knight, &c.
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A poll and land-tax are now coming forth
Page No:
pp.400-401
Poem Title:
A ballad on the poll-act
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Pray sir did you hear of a late proclamation
Page No:
p.400
Poem Title:
On the exchequer bills
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Hail happy W------ thou art strangely great
Page No:
pp.401-402
Poem Title:
A panegyrick, 1696/7
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Let mighty Caesar not disdain to view
Page No:
pp.402-403
Poem Title:
On the Earl of Castlemain's embassy to Rome in King James II. reign. 1687
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
How nobly did our grateful city join
Page No:
pp.404-405
Poem Title:
On King William's statue at Dublin in memory of the victory at the Boyne, July 1st, 1690
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Not attributed
First Line:
Justitiae defensor eras defensor honesti
Page No:
p.404
Poem Title:
On the Lord Treby's death. 1702
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Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Tell me Dormida why so gay
Page No:
pp.405-406
Poem Title:
On the Countess of Dor------r mistress to King J---- II. 1680. By the Earl of D----
Attribution:
By the Earl of D----
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There was a k--- of a S------h race
Page No:
pp.406-407
Poem Title:
A psalm sung the 30th January, 1696. At the C----s-H--d Club
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Not attributed
First Line:
Insulting ass who basely could revile
Page No:
p.408
Poem Title:
An answer to a Jacobite panegyrick upon Sorrel
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First Line:
Whether by sea our mighty Ormond flies
Page No:
pp.409-410
Poem Title:
On the expedition to Cales under the D. of Ormond. 1702
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
When haughty monarchs their proud State expose
Page No:
pp.411-412
Poem Title:
To the Queen at her coming to Christ-Church
Attribution:
by Mr. Harcourt, Son to Sir Simon Harcourt, Solicitor General to Her Majesty.
Attributed To:
Simon Harcourt
First Line:
And you auspicious prince our other Care
Page No:
pp.412-413
Poem Title:
To the prince, at his coming to Christ-Church. Spoke by Mr. Cowslade
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
With love though rude we crowd this hallowed place
Page No:
pp.413-414
Poem Title:
To the Queen at supper. Spoke by Mr. Finch, son to the honourable Heneage Finch Esq.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Madam once more the obsequious muse
Page No:
pp.414-415
Poem Title:
To the Queen going to bed. Spoke by Mr. Pultney
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First Line:
Through storms of wind and swelling seas which roar
Page No:
pp.416-417
Poem Title:
On the Duke of Ormond's success at Vigo, 1702
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Whilst Lewis the tyrant te deum does sing
Page No:
pp.416-417
Poem Title:
On the thanksgiving day, Nov. 12. 1702. for the success of her majesty and her allies by sea and land
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Annals and statues have the hero graced
Page No:
pp.417-418
Poem Title:
On the recovery of his royal highness the prince, Lord High Admiral of England. Novem. 1702
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Happy the people where no priest gives rules
Page No:
pp.419-420
Poem Title:
On the French protestants extolling their prince, notwithstanding his forcing them to abandon their native country
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Rise lofty numbers rise from scenes of light
Page No:
pp.420-421
Poem Title:
On her majesty's birth-day, Feb. 6. 1702
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sicilian muse begin a loftier flight
Page No:
p.422-425
Poem Title:
The Golden Age Restor'd. A Poem in imitation of the fourth Pastoral of Virgil; suppos'd to have been taken from a Sibylline Prophecy.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sicilian muse begin a loftier strain
Page No:
pp.426-428
Poem Title:
The Fourth Pastoral of Virgil.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Were I to choose what sort of corpse I'd wear
Page No:
pp.428-437
Poem Title:
An answer to the Earl of Rochester's satyr against man.
Attribution:
Written by Dr. P-----ck
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
What hand what skill can frame the artful piece
Page No:
pp.428-432
Poem Title:
Advice to a painter, 1697
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sicilian goddess whose prophetic tongue
Page No:
pp.438-441
Poem Title:
The golden age revers'd
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sicilian muse thy voice and subject raise
Page No:
pp.441-445
Poem Title:
The golden age, from the fourth eclog of Virgil, &c.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If we into our selves or round us look
Page No:
pp.445-467
Poem Title:
A poem, in defence of the Church of England; In opposition to the Hind and Panther, written by Mr. John Dryden
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Not attributed
First Line:
Take courage noble Charles and cease to muse
Page No:
pp.467-468
Poem Title:
Quintus Arbelius to Charles Lord H-------
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
Great Nassau from his cradle to his grave
Page No:
p.468
Poem Title:
On King William the III
Attribution:
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Not attributed
First Line:
And here must the hero that redeemed our land
Page No:
pp.469-471
Poem Title:
Postscript
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed