Blacklight

Poems on several occasions [T42622] [ecco]

DMI number:
513
Publication Date:
1734
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T42622
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW112275057
Shelfmark:
ECCO - BOD
Full Title:
POEMS | ON | SEVERAL OCCASIONS. | [rule] | [ornament] | [rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed for C. RIVINGTON, at the [i]Bible[/i] | and [i]Crown[/i] in St. [i]Paul[/i]'s [i]Church-Yard.[/i] | [short rule] | M.DCC.XXXIV.
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Subscription Miscellany
Format:
Quarto
Comments:
ATTRIBUTIONS: The collection is dominated by the work of Mary Barber, but her verses are not individually attributed. The poems that are presented (implicitly or explicitly) as her work have been described as 'Collected under Barber's name'. MISCELLANY GENRE: Collection dominated by Mary Barber and including the work of her friends and family.
Other matter:
PREFATORY MATTER: Dedication to 'The Right Honourable John, Earl of Orrery' signed by Swift (pp. iii-viii); Dedication to 'The Right Honourable John, Earl of Orrery' signed by Mary Barber (pp. ix-xvi); Preface (pp. xvii-xxx); Subscription list (pp. xxxi-xliv); Verse address to the author by Constantia Grierson (pp. xlv-xlviii) BACK MATTER: Index (7pp.)
Related Miscellanies
Title:
Poems on several occasions [T42623]
Publication Date:
1735
ESTC No:
T42623
Volume:
None
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Poems on several occasions [T42643] [ecco]
Publication Date:
1736
ESTC No:
T42643
Volume:
None
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Related People
Publisher:
C. Rivington
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Dedicatee:
John Boyle
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Editor:
Jonathan Swift
Confidence:
Speculation (10%)
Comments:
Swift was persuaded to write dedicatory / recommendatory epistle to this volume.
Editor:
Mary Barber
Confidence:
Confident (50%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Long has the warrior's and the lover's fire
Page No:
pp.xlv-xlviii
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Mary Barber, under the Name of Sapphira: Occasion'd by the Encouragement She met with in England, to publish her Poems by Subscription.
Attribution:
Constantia Grierson
Attributed To:
Constantia Grierson
First Line:
Fair innocence the muse's loveliest theme
Page No:
pp.1-2
Poem Title:
To the Honble. Miss Carteret, now Countess of Dysert.
Attribution:
Collected under Mary Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Wearied with long attendance on the court
Page No:
pp.2-5
Poem Title:
The Widow Gordon's Petition: To the Right Hon. the Lady Carteret.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name.
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Eternal king is there one hour
Page No:
p.6
Poem Title:
Written in the Conclusion of a Letter to Mr. Tickell, entreating him to recommend the Widow Gordon's Petition.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
A mother who vast pleasure finds
Page No:
pp.7-12
Poem Title:
A True Tale.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
What is it our mammas bewitches
Page No:
pp.13-16
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, and Spoken by him at his first putting on Breeches.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name.
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
All bounteous heaven Castalio cries
Page No:
pp.17-19
Poem Title:
An unanswerable Apology for the Rich.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
When Athens was for arts and arms renowned
Page No:
pp.20-21
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, and spoken by him at School to some of the Fellows of the College of Dublin, at a Publick Examination for Victors.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Though rhyme serves the thoughts of great poets to fetter
Page No:
pp.22-27
Poem Title:
The Prodigy. A Letter to a Friend in the Country.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Sincerity what are thy views
Page No:
pp.28-29
Poem Title:
Sincerity. A Poem. Occasion'd by a Friend's resenting some Advice I gave.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
For fleeting life recalled for health restored
Page No:
pp.30-31
Poem Title:
To Dr. Richard Helsham. Upon my Recovery from a dangerous Fit of Sickness.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Celia when you oblige again
Page No:
p.32
Poem Title:
To Mrs. --.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
When you command the muse obeys
Page No:
pp.33-35
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Lady Dowager Torrington, with some Verses her Ladyship commanded me to send Her.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Our master in a fatal hour
Page No:
pp.36-37
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, and spoken by him in School, upon his Master's first bringing in a Rod.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
This mourning mother can with ease explore
Page No:
pp.38-40
Poem Title:
Occasion'd by seeing some Verses written by Mrs. Constantia Grierson, upon the Death of her Son.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Who can the hardest task refuse
Page No:
p.41
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Lady Elizabeth Brownlow, upon desiring me to send Her some of my Poems.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
The favours of fortune I once hoped to gain
Page No:
p.42
Poem Title:
The Resolution.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
I little thought that honest Dick
Page No:
pp.43-44
Poem Title:
Written for my Son in his Sickness, to one of his School-Fellows.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
In some few hours we must repair
Page No:
p.45
Poem Title:
Written at Tunbridge-Wells, To the Right Honourable the Lady Barbara North, occasion'd by some of the Company's saying they would go to Faint-Fair, and act a Play.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Ye gentle beaux and thoughtless belles
Page No:
p.46
Poem Title:
Upon seeing a Raffle for Addison's Works unfilled.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Flavia since conquest is your aim
Page No:
p.47
Poem Title:
To a Lady at Bath.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
An oak with spreading branches crowned
Page No:
pp.48-49
Poem Title:
The Oak and its Branches. A Fable. Occasion'd by seeing a dead Oak beautifully encompassed with Ivy.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
I beg your scholar you'll excuse
Page No:
p.50
Poem Title:
An Apology written for my Son to his Master, who had commanded him to write Verses on the Death of the late Lord --.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Might I inquire the reasons of my fate
Page No:
pp.51-53
Poem Title:
Written for a Gentlewoman in Distress. To her Grace Adelida, Dutchess of Shrewsbury.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
We of late had a terrible rout in our house
Page No:
p.54
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, to some of the Fellows of the College, who took care of the School in his Master's Absence.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Your late kind gift let me restore
Page No:
pp.55-56
Poem Title:
A Letter written for my Daughter, to a Lady who had presented her with a Cap.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Were princes graced with souls like thine
Page No:
p.57
Poem Title:
To his Grace the Duke of Chandos.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Tis time to conclude for I make it a rule
Page No:
pp.58-62
Poem Title:
The Conclusion of a Letter to the Rev. Mr. C- -.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Once Jupiter from out the skies
Page No:
pp.63-64
Poem Title:
Jupiter and Fortune, a Fable.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Let me the honour soon obtain
Page No:
pp.65-66
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Lady Sarah Cowper. Written when the Author was sick at Tunbridge-Wells.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
As in some wealthy trading town
Page No:
pp.67-69
Poem Title:
A Letter to a Friend, on Occasion of some Libels written against him.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Somnus powerful deity
Page No:
p.70
Poem Title:
An Hymn to Sleep. Written when the Author was sick.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
A curious statue we are told
Page No:
pp.71-72
Poem Title:
On Sending my Son, as a Present, to Dr. Swift, Dean of St. Patrick's, on his Birth-Day.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Ye heedless fair who pass the livelong day
Page No:
pp.73-76
Poem Title:
Occasion'd by reading the Memoirs of Anne of Austria, written by Madam de Motteville. Inscrib'd to the Right Honourable the Countess of Herford.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Say Worsdeal where you learned the art
Page No:
p.77
Poem Title:
On the Dutchess of Newcastle's Picture.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Dear Rose as I lately was writing some verse
Page No:
pp.78-79
Poem Title:
A Letter for my Son to one of his Schoolfellows, Son to Henry Rose, Esq;
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
I grieve to think that Waller's blamed
Page No:
pp.80-81
Poem Title:
To a Gentleman, who had abus'd Waller.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Welcome thou sacred solemn guest
Page No:
p.82
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, in a Bible which was presented to him.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Believe me Rose however this Con may please
Page No:
pp.83-84
Poem Title:
To Mr. Rose; sent in the Name of the Honourable Mr. Barry, one of his Schoolfellows...Occasion'd by the foregoing Verses, p. 78.
Attribution:
Written by the Reverend Dr. T-
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since Phoebus makes your verse divine
Page No:
pp.85-86
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, to Mr. Barry, occasion'd by the foregoing Verses.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Thus twice detected Con thy pride give over
Page No:
pp.87-89
Poem Title:
Upon my Son's speaking Latin in School to less Advantage than English: Written as from a Schoolfellow.
Attribution:
By Mrs. Grierson
Attributed To:
Constantia Grierson
First Line:
With joy your summons we obey
Page No:
pp.90-92
Poem Title:
An Apology written for my Son to the Reverend Mr. Sampson, who had invited some Friends to celebrate Lord Carteret's Birth-Day, at Mount-Carteret near Dublin; and desir'd my Son to write on that Occasion.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
My lord of Killala I find to my sorrow
Page No:
pp.93-94
Poem Title:
Apology to Dr. Clayton, Bishop of Killala, and his Lady, who had promis'd to dine with the Author.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
So Ceres lovely and divine
Page No:
p.95
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, upon Lady Santry's coming to School, to see her Son, and getting the Scholars a Play-Day.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Is what we owe great William then
Page No:
p.96
Poem Title:
Written for my Son to his Master, on the Anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Why are we scholars plagued to write
Page No:
pp.97-98
Poem Title:
An Apology for my Son to his Master, for not bringing an Exercise on the Coronation Day.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
A wretch in smoky Dublin pent
Page No:
pp.99-102
Poem Title:
Written from Dublin, to a Lady in the Country.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
I grieve to see you waste your time
Page No:
pp.103-104
Poem Title:
Sent as from a Schoolfellow to my Son, Anno 1727.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Ierne's now our royal care
Page No:
pp.105-110
Poem Title:
Apollo's Edict.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
A courtier summoned hence of late
Page No:
pp.111-113
Poem Title:
News from St. James's.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name.
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
When Cynthia regent of the tides
Page No:
pp.114-115
Poem Title:
To a Lady who was libell'd.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
When ruin threatened me of late
Page No:
pp.116-117
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Lady Elizabeth Germain, upon seeing her do a generous Action. Written as from the Person reliev'd.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Ladies this entertainment we have shown
Page No:
pp.118-119
Poem Title:
Epilogue to a Comedy acted at Bath, where the Dutchess of Ormond was present.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Madam I hear and hear with sorrow
Page No:
pp.120-121
Poem Title:
To her Grace the Dutchess of Manchester, and Lady Diana Spencer, now Dutchess of Bedford. The humble Petition of little Jemmy Pen, at Tunbridge-Wells.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
And will your goodness never have an end
Page No:
pp.122-123
Poem Title:
To the Honourable Mrs. Percival.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
You used me ill and I withdrew
Page No:
pp.124-125
Poem Title:
Written at Bath to a young Lady. who had just before given me a short Answer.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Stella and Flavia every hour
Page No:
pp.126-127
Poem Title:
Stella and Flavia.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Dear Jack whilst you through Flanders roam
Page No:
pp.128-130
Poem Title:
A Letter written for my Son to a young Gentleman, who was sent to be educated at the Jesuits College in Flanders.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Dear Psyche come with cheerful face
Page No:
p.131
Poem Title:
To Mrs. S-. Written in my Sickness.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
How gladly madam would I go
Page No:
pp.132-135
Poem Title:
To a Lady, who invited the Author into the Country.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
The picture strikes tis drawn with wondrous art
Page No:
pp.136-137
Poem Title:
To his Excellency the Lord Carteret. Occasion'd by seeing a Poem, intitled, The Birth of Manly Virtue.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Some guardian powers in pity to our land
Page No:
pp.138-139
Poem Title:
To the Honourable Mrs. Percival, on her desisting from the Bermudan Project.
Attribution:
By Mrs. Grierson
Attributed To:
Constantia Grierson
First Line:
You say tis hard to copy well
Page No:
p.140
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Newans, encouraging her to draw Lady Killmorey's Picture.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
In vain you show a happy nation
Page No:
p.141
Poem Title:
To the Reverend Dr. L--. Occasion'd by his Sermon for the Support of the Charity-Children at Tunbridge-Wells, where the Collection was small.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
So little given at chapel door
Page No:
p.142
Poem Title:
An Epigram on the same Occasion.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Children are snatched away sometimes
Page No:
p.143
Poem Title:
An Epitaph on the late Lord Mac Cashel.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
How well these laymen love to gibe
Page No:
pp.144-145
Poem Title:
An Apology for the Clergy, who were present when the Minister of the Parish read prayers and preach'd twice in one Day, at Tunbridge-Wells. Written at the Request of a Layman.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Books pictures statues here we find
Page No:
p.146
Poem Title:
Written at Dr. Mead's House in Ormond-Street, to Mrs. Mead.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Hither amongst the crowds that shun
Page No:
pp.147-148
Poem Title:
Written upon the Rocks at Tunbridge, on seeing the Names of several Persons written there.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Say my Hortensia in this silent hour
Page No:
pp.149-150
Poem Title:
A Letter written from London to Mrs. Strangeways Horner, whom the Author had left the Day before at Tunbridge-Wells. Oct. 1730.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Today as at my glass I stood
Page No:
pp.151-153
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Frances-Arabella Kelly.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Forgive me fair one nor resent
Page No:
p.154
Poem Title:
The Recantation: To the same Lady.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
The internal senses painted here we see
Page No:
p.155
Poem Title:
To the Honourable Mrs. Percival, with Hutcheson's Treatise on Beauty and Order.
Attribution:
By Mrs. Grierson
Attributed To:
Constantia Grierson
First Line:
When lately you acquitted me
Page No:
pp.156-157
Poem Title:
The Author, who had been engag'd to dine with Mrs. Caesar, was excus'd by that Lady, upon an Invitation from Lord Carteret's; and the next Day Mrs. Caesar was invited by the Speaker, which occasion'd the following Lines. To Mrs. Caesar, at the Speaker's Lodgings at Bath.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Tis said for every common grief
Page No:
p.158
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable John Earl of Orrery, at Bath, after the Death of the late Earl.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Nor Bath nor Tunbridge can my lays inspire
Page No:
p.159
Poem Title:
The Earl's Answer, written extempore.
Attribution:
'The Earl's Answer' [i.e. John, Earl of Orrery]
Attributed To:
John Boyle
First Line:
Why did I hope to make your anguish less
Page No:
p.160
Poem Title:
Reply to the foregoing Verses.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
The Britons in their nature shy
Page No:
pp.161-163
Poem Title:
On leaving Bath.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Swift for the ancients has argued so well
Page No:
p.164
Poem Title:
An Epigram on the Battle of the Books.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Whilst happily I pass my hours
Page No:
pp.165-166
Poem Title:
Written at Camberwell near London in the Study of Mr. Wainwright, now Baron of the Exchequer in Ireland, where the Author accidentally din'd alone.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Uncommon charms I plainly see
Page No:
p.167
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Putland.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Contented in my humble state
Page No:
p.168
Poem Title:
Occasion'd by seeing the Honourable -- -- treat a Person of Merit with Insolence, who came to make a Request to her.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Start not nor tremble at the sight of this
Page No:
p.169
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Lady Kilmorey, with a Letter, which was written by the late Lady Roydon, of the Kingdom of Ireland, just before her Death.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Your wine by southern suns refined
Page No:
p.170
Poem Title:
To Dr. Mead, on his Cape Wine.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Though the muse had denied me so often before
Page No:
pp.171-172
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Earl of Orrery, on his Promise to sup with me.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Shall for the Man of Ross thy lyre be strung
Page No:
pp.173-179
Poem Title:
To Mr. Pope: Intreating him to write Verses to the Memory of Thomas, late Earl of Thanet.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Dear Philomela oft you condescend
Page No:
p.180
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Anne Donnellan, with the fourth Essay on Man.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
To you Athenians we again submit
Page No:
pp.181-185
Poem Title:
Written for my Son, and spoken by him, at a public Examination for Victors.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Lovely Armina over her books reclined
Page No:
p.186
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Armine Cartwright, at Bath.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Obrian we're in story told
Page No:
pp.187-188
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Earl of Thomond, at Bath; who charg'd the Author with making an Irish Bull.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
O thou with every virtue graced
Page No:
pp.189-193
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Strangeways Horner, with a Letter from my Son; wherein he desires me to accept his first Prize of Learning, conferr'd on him by the University of Dublin.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Go jealousy tormentress dire
Page No:
p.194
Poem Title:
On imagining a Friend had treated the Author with Indifference.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
O Charlotte truly pious early wise
Page No:
p.195
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable Charlotte Lady Conway, on her resolving to leave Bath.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name.
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
When I heard you were landed I flew to the nine
Page No:
pp.196-197
Poem Title:
An Invitation to Edward Walpole, Esq; upon hearing he was landed in Dublin.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Though great Longinus claims thy aiding hand
Page No:
pp.198-202
Poem Title:
To the Reverend Mr. Mabell, of Cambridge, who has publish'd Proposals for a Translation of Longinus.
Attribution:
By William Ward, Esq;
Attributed To:
William Ward
First Line:
Let others speak your titles and your blood
Page No:
pp.203-205
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Earl of Orrery, in Dublin, Upon receiving an Account from Mrs. Barber, of his Lordship's great Generosity to her.
Attribution:
By the Same [i.e. Ward]
Attributed To:
William Ward
First Line:
O thou my beauteous ever tender friend
Page No:
pp.206-214
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Ward.
Attribution:
By the Same [i.e. Ward]
Attributed To:
William Ward
First Line:
These plains so joyous once to me
Page No:
pp.215-216
Poem Title:
Written at Tunbridge-Wells, where the Author had, the Year before, been honour'd with the Acquaintance of Mrs. Strangeways Horner, who, after, went abroad on account of her Health.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
You cry she's bred in the old way
Page No:
p.217
Poem Title:
To Novella, on her saying deridingly, that a Lady of great Merit, and fine Address, was bred in the Old Way. An Epigram.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
In various forms have I been shown
Page No:
pp.218-221
Poem Title:
The Speech of Cupid, upon seeing himself painted by the Honourable Miss Carteret, (now Countess of Dysert) on a Fan.
Attribution:
Written by Mrs. Grierson
Attributed To:
Constantia Grierson
First Line:
Wherever you go some actions still we hear
Page No:
pp.222-223
Poem Title:
To the Honourable Mrs. Spencer, on her removing from Windsor to Rookly in Hampshire.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
No more at critics Ned repine
Page No:
p.224
Poem Title:
To a Gentleman, who shew'd a fine Poem as his own.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
To the late king of Britain a savage was brought
Page No:
pp.225-226
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable John Barber, Esq; Lord Mayor of London, on committing one of my Sons to his Care.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
This present from a lovely dame
Page No:
p.227
Poem Title:
Spoken extempore, to the Right Honourable the Lady Barbara North, on her presenting the Author with a white Ribband at Tunbridge-Wells.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Return brave youth suspend thy martial fire
Page No:
pp.228-229
Poem Title:
To his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Normanby, at the Camp before Philipsburg.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Remote from strife from urban throngs and noise
Page No:
p.230
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
By a Person of Quality
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Goddess of health wherever you dwell
Page No:
p.231
Poem Title:
Verses occasion'd by the Sickness of Mrs. Anne Donnellan.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Since Milo rallies sacred writ
Page No:
p.232
Poem Title:
An Epigram.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
O wretch hath madness cured thy dire despair
Page No:
pp.233-235
Poem Title:
On seeing an Officer's Widow distracted, who had been driven to Despair, by a long and fruitless Sollicitation for the Arrears of her Pension.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
I read in your delighted face
Page No:
pp.236-237
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Mary Caesar, upon seeing her just after the Marriage of her Friend, the Lady Margaret Harley.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Sophronia all the world agree
Page No:
pp.238-239
Poem Title:
To Sophronia.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Ye heedless fair who trifle life away
Page No:
p.240
Poem Title:
Advice to the Ladies at Bath.
Attribution:
Written by a Lady
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I hope sir by this you have found your account
Page No:
p.241
Poem Title:
To a Gentleman who tool a very grave Friend of his, to visit one of a quite different Turn.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Well you sincerity display
Page No:
p.242
Poem Title:
To a Lady, who valu'd herself on speaking her Mind in a blunt Manner, which she call'd being sincere.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
You look surprised in this deriding age
Page No:
pp.243-245
Poem Title:
Prologue to Theodosius: Spoken by Athenais at the Theatre in Dublin, when Lord and Lady Carteret were in Ireland.
Attribution:
Written by Mrs. Grierson
Attributed To:
Constantia Grierson
First Line:
Thou glorious ruler of the beauteous day
Page No:
pp.246-249
Poem Title:
A Letter to Mrs. Barber, at Tunbridge-Wells.
Attribution:
Constantine Barber
Attributed To:
Constantine Barber
First Line:
May each new year some new perfection give
Page No:
pp.250-251
Poem Title:
To the Right Honourable the Lady Elizabeth Boyle, Daughter to the Right Honourable John Earl of Orrery, on her Birth-day, May 7. 1733.
Attribution:
By the Same [i.e. Constantine Barber]
Attributed To:
Constantine Barber
First Line:
Though the plum and the peach with Apollo conspire
Page No:
p.252
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Frances-Arabella Kelly, with a Present of Fruit.
Attribution:
By the Same [i.e. Constantine Barber]
Attributed To:
Constantine Barber
First Line:
As through this sylvan scene I strayed
Page No:
p.253
Poem Title:
Verses ty'd about a Fawn's Neck, which was presented to a very young Lady, call'd by her Friends the Ivory Maid.
Attribution:
By the Same [i.e. Constantine Barber]
Attributed To:
Constantine Barber
First Line:
See the bright sun renews his annual course
Page No:
pp.254-255
Poem Title:
To Mrs. Barber.
Attribution:
By the Same [i.e. Constantine Barber]
Attributed To:
Constantine Barber
First Line:
Not Persia's monarch could unmoved survey
Page No:
p.256
Poem Title:
An Apology to the Earl of Orrery, Dr. Swift, and some others of my Friends, for falling into Tears before them, on my leaving Ireland.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Once Juno's bird as authors say
Page No:
pp.257-259
Poem Title:
The Peacock. A Tale. Inscrib'd, (once at a Wedding) to the Bashaws of Utopia.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Why lovely Lelia so depressed
Page No:
pp.260-261
Poem Title:
To a Lady in the Spleen, whom the Author was desir'd to amuse.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
See in the temple raised by Harley's hand
Page No:
p.262
Poem Title:
On the Earl of Oxford and Mortimer's giving his Daughter in Marriage in Oxford-Chapel.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Tis theirs who but to please aspire
Page No:
pp.263-264
Poem Title:
To her Grace the Dutchess of Portland, with the foregoing Lines.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
In vain with mimic skill my pencil tries
Page No:
pp.265-266
Poem Title:
On her drawing the Lord Boyle's Picture.
Attribution:
Verses written by Mrs. Elizabeth Rowe
Attributed To:
Elizabeth Rowe [nee Singer]
First Line:
No air of wit no beauteous grace I boast
Page No:
p.266
Poem Title:
Lord Boyle's Answer to the foregoing Verses.
Attribution:
Lord Boyle's Answer
Attributed To:
John Boyle
First Line:
Whilst Gay's unhappy fate thy ear attends
Page No:
p.267
Poem Title:
To Robert Barber Esq; Deputy to the Treasurer's Remembrancer in the Court of Exchequer, on his attending, whilst his Son repeated Gay's Fable of the Hare and Many Friends.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Should you employ your ridicule
Page No:
pp.268-269
Poem Title:
Verses sent to a Lady, who took Delight in ridiculing a Person of very weak Understanding, whom she reliev'd from Want.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
Tell me my patroness and friend
Page No:
p.270
Poem Title:
To Lady H--r, who ask'd, Had the Author done writing Verses?
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
A sight like this who can unmoved survey
Page No:
pp.271-274
Poem Title:
On seeing the Captives, lately redeem'd from Barbary by His Majesty.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber
First Line:
How I succeed you kindly ask
Page No:
pp.275-283
Poem Title:
To a Lady, who commanded me to send her an Account in Verse, how I succeeded in my Subscription.
Attribution:
Collected under Barber's name
Attributed To:
Mary Barber