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The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis translated into English verse by Mr. Dryden, and several other eminent hands. Together with the satires of Aulus Persius Flaccus. [ESTC R227253]

DMI number:
1697
Aliases
Satires of Juvenal and Persius
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Evidence:
Publication Date:
1697
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
R227253
EEBO/ECCO link:
http://eebo.chadwyck.com/search/full_rec?SOURCE=config.cfg&action=byid&ID=11217574&SUBSET=
Shelfmark:
EEBO - BL
Full Title:
THE | SATIRES | OF | [i] Decimus Junius Juvenalis [/i]. | Translated into English VERSE. | [rule] | By Mr. [i] DRYDEN [/i], | [i] And Several Other Eminent Hands [i]. | [rule] | Together with the | SATIRES of [i] Aulus Persius Flaccus [/i]. | [rule] | Made English by Mr. [i] DRYDEN [/i]. | [rule] | With Explanatory Notes at the End of each SATIRE. | [rule] | To which is prefix'd, | [i] A Discourse concerning the Original and | Progress of [/i] SATIRE. | Dedicated to the Right Honourable | [i] CHARLES [/i] Earl of [i] Dorset [/i], &c. | By Mr. [i] DRYDEN [/i]. | [rule] | [epigraph] | [rule] | Adorn'd with SCULPTURES. | [rule] | [i] LONDON [/i]: Printed for [i] Jacob Tonson [/i]; and are to be Sold by [i] Robert | Knaplock [/i], at the [i] Angel and Crown [/i] in St. [i] Paul's Churchyard [/i], 1697.
Epigraph:
[i] Quicquid agunt homines, votum, timor, Ira, voluptas, | Gaudia, discursus, nostri est farrago libelli [/i].
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of literary verse, Collection of satirical verse, and Collection of translations/imitations
Format:
Folio
Comments:
Plates: plates facing the two title-pages and pp.5, 25, 43, 75, 95, 115, 167, 189, 227, 245, 279. 305, 321, 345, 371, 383
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: (1) Dedication 'To the Right Honourable Charles, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex' (2) 'A Table to Juvenal' Second title-page: THE | SATIRES | OF | Aulus Persius Flaccus. | [rule] | Made ENGLISH | BY | Mr. [i] DRYDEN [/i]. | [rule] | [i] Saepius in Libro memoratur Persius uno, | Quam levis in tota Marsus Amazonide [/i]. | Mart. | [rule] | [i] LONDON [/i], | Printed for [i] Jacob Tonson [/i], at the [i] Judge's Head [/i] in | [i] Fleet-Street [/i], 1697.
References:
NCBEL 340 (1697)
Related Miscellanies
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123245]
Publication Date:
1754
ESTC No:
T123245
Volume:
1 of 13
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123248]
Publication Date:
1713
ESTC No:
T123248
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123505]
Publication Date:
1711
ESTC No:
T123505
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123512]
Publication Date:
1735
ESTC No:
T123512
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123528]
Publication Date:
1726
ESTC No:
T123528
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123534]
Publication Date:
1702
ESTC No:
T123534
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T47106]
Publication Date:
1732
ESTC No:
T47106
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Another Edition of
Comments:
Related People
Dedicatee:
Charles Sackville
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Publisher:
Jacob Tonson
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Editor:
John Dryden
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Translated from:
Juvenal
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Translated from:
Persius
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Still shall I hear and never quit the score
Page No:
pp.5-19
Poem Title:
The First Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I'm sick of Rome and wish my self conveyed
Page No:
pp.25-38
Poem Title:
The Second Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Tate
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Grieved though I am an ancient friend to lose
Page No:
pp.43-70
Poem Title:
The Third Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Once more Crispinus called upon the stage
Page No:
pp.75-89
Poem Title:
The Fourth Satyr
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If hardened by affronts and still the same
Page No:
pp.95-108
Poem Title:
The Fifth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Bowles
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
In Saturn's reign at nature's early birth
Page No:
pp.115-61
Poem Title:
The Sixth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
On Caesar all our studies must depend
Page No:
pp.167-84
Poem Title:
The Seventh Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Charles Dryden
Attributed To:
Charles Dryden
First Line:
What's the advantage or the real good
Page No:
pp.189-216
Poem Title:
The Eighth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. G. Stepny of Trinity College in Cambridge
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Tell me why sauntering thus from place to place
Page No:
pp.227-40
Poem Title:
The Ninth Satyr
Attribution:
Stephen Harvey, Esq
Attributed To:
Stephen Harvey
First Line:
Look round the habitable world how few
Page No:
pp.245-73
Poem Title:
The Tenth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
If noble Atticus make plenteous feasts
Page No:
pp.279-97
Poem Title:
The Eleventh Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. William Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
This day's this joyful day's solemnity
Page No:
pp.305-13
Poem Title:
The Twelfth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Thomas Power, Fellow of Trinity-Colledge in Cambridge
Attributed To:
Thomas Power
First Line:
He that commits a sin shall quickly find
Page No:
pp.321-39
Poem Title:
The Thirteenth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Thomas Creech, Fellow of All-Souls Colledge in Oxford
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Fuscinus those ill deeds that sully fame
Page No:
pp.345-65
Poem Title:
The Fourteenth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. John Dryden, Jun.
Attributed To:
Dryden||John||Junior
First Line:
How Egypt mad with superstition grown
Page No:
pp.371-8
Poem Title:
The Fifteenth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Tate
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
What vast prerogatives my Gallus are
Page No:
pp.383-90
Poem Title:
The Sixteenth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As when of Old Heroique Story tells
Page No:
pp.397-9
Poem Title:
To Mr. Dryden, On His Translation of Persius
Attribution:
Will. Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
I never did on cleft Parnassus dream
Page No:
pp.401-2
Poem Title:
Prologue to the First Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
How anxious are our cares and yet how vain
Page No:
pp.404-19
Poem Title:
The First Satyr. In Dialogue betwixt the Poet and his Friend or Monitor
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Let this auspicious morning be expressed
Page No:
pp.425-33
Poem Title:
The Second Satyr. Dedicated to his Friend Plotius Macrinus, on his Birth-day
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Is this thy daily course the glaring sun
Page No:
pp.437-50
Poem Title:
The Third Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Whoever thou art whose forward years are bent
Page No:
pp.456-63
Poem Title:
The Fourth Satyr
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Of ancient use to poets it belongs
Page No:
pp.470-85
Poem Title:
The Fifth Satyr. Inscrib'd to the Reverend Dr. Busby
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Has winter caused thee friend to change thy seat
Page No:
pp.491-8
Poem Title:
The Sixth Satyr. To Caesius Bassus, a Lyrick Poet
Attribution:
Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden