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The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123245]

DMI number:
259
Aliases
Satires of Juvenal.
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Evidence:
Publication Date:
1754
Volume Number:
1 of 13
ESTC number:
T123245
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW3313363902
Shelfmark:
BOD Montagu 314
Full Title:
THE | SATYRS | OF | [i]Decimus Junius Juvenalis:[/i] | AND OF | [i]AULUS PERSIUS FLACCUS.[/i] | [rule] | Translated into [i]English[/i] VERSE | By Mr. [i]DRYDEN[/i], | [i]And several other Hands.[/i] | [rule] | To which is Prefix'd a | DISCOURSE | Concerning the | Original and Progress of SATYR. | [rule] | [epigraph] | [rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed for J. and R. TONSON and S. DRAPER | in the [i]Strand[/i]. | [rule] | M DCC LIV.
Epigraph:
[i]Quicquid agunt Homines, votum, timor, ira, voluptas, Gaudia, discursus, nostri est farrago libelli.[/i]
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of translations/imitations
Format:
Duodecimo
Price:
n/a
Pagination:
[2], [iii]-c, [2], 1-294
Bibliographic details:
Mispagination: xlii misnumbered as xlvi; xliii as xlxii; xlvi as l; xlvii as li; 287 as 687. Bibliographical details: MS annotations in pencil at various points in BOD Montagu 314. Satires of Persius has a separate title page, p. 231: THE | SATYRS | OF | [i]Aulus Persius Flaccus[/i]. | [rule] | Made [i]English[/i] | By Mr. [i]DRYDEN.[/i] | [rule] | [i]Saepius in Libro memoratur Persius uno, | Quam levis in tota Marsus Amazonide.[/i] | Mart. | [rule] | [i]LONDON:[/i] | Printed in the YEAR M DCC LIV.
Comments:
Notes: there are no plates in this edition. Arguments prefix each poem. Notes are placed at the bottom of each page, rather than at the end of the poem as in early editions of this work. MISCELLANY GENRE: translations of Juvenal and Persius.
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Dedication / introductory essay addressed 'To the Right Honourable Charles, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex', signed by Dryden, pp. [iii]-c; table of contents p. [ci]
References:
No entry in Case (post-1750) but is mentioned following 200 (h).
Related Miscellanies
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123248]
Publication Date:
1713
ESTC No:
T123248
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123505]
Publication Date:
1711
ESTC No:
T123505
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123534]
Publication Date:
1702
ESTC No:
T123534
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123512]
Publication Date:
1735
ESTC No:
T123512
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T123528]
Publication Date:
1726
ESTC No:
T123528
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
The satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English verse [T47106]
Publication Date:
1732
ESTC No:
T47106
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Related People
Dedicatee:
Charles Sackville
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Right Honourable Charles, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex'.
Publisher:
Jacob Tonson
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Printed for J. and R. TONSON and S. DRAPER in the Strand.'
Editor:
John Dryden
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Dedication signed by Dryden.
Publisher:
Richard Tonson
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Printed for J. and R. TONSON and S. DRAPER in the Strand.'
Publisher:
Somerset Draper
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Printed for J. and R. TONSON and S. DRAPER in the Strand.'
Content/Publication
First Line:
Still shall I hear and never quit the score
Page No:
pp.2-12
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The First Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
I'm sick of Rome and wish my self conveyed
Page No:
pp.13-21
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Second Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Tate
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Grieved though I am an ancient friend to lose
Page No:
pp.23-39
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Third Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Once more Crispinus called upon the stage
Page No:
pp.41-51
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Fourth Satyr.
Attribution:
By the Rev. Mr. Richard Duke
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
If hardened by affronts and still the same
Page No:
pp.52-61
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Fifth Satyr.
Attribution:
By the Reverend Mr. William Bowles
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
In Saturn's reign at nature's early birth
Page No:
pp.65-92
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Sixth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
On Caesar all our studies must depend
Page No:
pp.93-105
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Seventh Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Charles Dryden
Attributed To:
Charles Dryden
First Line:
What's the advantage or the real good
Page No:
pp.107-128
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Eighth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. G. Stepny of Trinity College in Cambridge
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Tell me why sauntering thus from place to place
Page No:
pp.132-140
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Ninth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Stephen Harvey, Esq;
Attributed To:
Stephen Harvey
First Line:
Look round the habitable world how few
Page No:
pp.142-160
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Tenth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
If noble Atticus make plenteous feasts
Page No:
pp.162-176
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Eleventh Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. William Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
This day's this joyful day's solemnity
Page No:
pp.178-186
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Twelfth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Thomas Power, Fellow of Trinity College in Cambridge
Attributed To:
Thomas Power
First Line:
He that commits a sin shall quickly find
Page No:
pp.189-199
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Thirteenth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Thomas Creech, Fellow of All-Souls-College in Oxford
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Fuscinus those ill deeds that sully fame
Page No:
pp.202-216
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Fourteenth Satyr....To his Friend Fuscinus.
Attribution:
By Mr. John Dryden, Jun.
Attributed To:
Dryden||John||Junior
First Line:
How Egypt mad with superstition grown
Page No:
pp.218-225
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Fifteenth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Tate
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
What vast prerogatives my Gallus are
Page No:
pp.227-230
Poem Title:
Juvenal. The Sixteenth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
As when of old heroic story tells
Page No:
pp.233-234
Poem Title:
To Mr. Dryden on his Translation of Persius.
Attribution:
Will. Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
I never did on cleft Parnassus dream
Page No:
p.236
Poem Title:
Prologue to the First Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
How anxious are our cares and yet how vain
Page No:
pp.237-247
Poem Title:
The First Satyr. In Dialogue betwixt the Poet and his Friend or Monitor.
Attribution:
By Mr Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Let this auspicious morning be expressed
Page No:
pp.249-254
Poem Title:
The Second Satyr. Dedicated to his Friend Plotius Macrinus, on his Birth-Day.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Is this thy daily course the glaring sun
Page No:
pp.256-265
Poem Title:
Persius. The Third Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Whoever thou art whose forward years are bent
Page No:
pp.267-273
Poem Title:
Persius. The Fourth Satyr.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Of ancient use to poets it belongs
Page No:
pp.275-285
Poem Title:
The Fifth Satyr. Inscrib'd to the Reverend Dr. Busby, The Speakers Persius and Cornutus.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Has winter caused thee friend to change thy seat
Page No:
pp.687[i.e. 287]-294
Poem Title:
The Sixth Satyr. To Caesius Bassus, a Lyrick Poet.
Attribution:
By Mr Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden