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Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [N41874 ] [vol.2] [ECCO]

DMI number:
648
Publication Date:
1727
Volume Number:
2 of 2
ESTC number:
N41874
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW117155870
Shelfmark:
Trinity College (Oxford) U.2.15[2]
Full Title:
OVID’[i]s[/i]| [i]METAMORPHOSES[/i], | IN | FIFTEEN BOOKS. | [i]Translated by the most Eminent[/i] HANDS. | [rule] | Adorn’d with SCULPTURES. | [rule] | VOLUME [i]the[/i] SECOND. | [rule] | The THIRD EDITION. | [rule] | [rule] |[i]DUBLIN:[/i] | Printed by S. POWELL, for G. RISK, | G. EWING, and W. SMITH, | in [i]Dame[/i]'s-[i]street[/i], MDCCXXVII.
Place of Publication:
Dublin
Format:
Duodecimo
Bibliographic details:
Vol.2 is the third edition. Engraved dedicatory plates opposite p. 1, 43, 74, 111, 145, 171, 215, 232, 241.
Comments:
CONTENTS: Translations of Ovid's Metamorphoses (Books VIII-XV) by various hands; Advertisment. MISCELLANY GENRE: Collection of imitations/translations.
Other matter:
PREFATORY MATERIAL: Contents page [4pp]. END-MATTER: Advertisment [1p].
References:
David Hopkins, 'Dryden and the Garth-Tonson Metamorphoses', New Series, Vol. XXXIX, No. 153 (1988).
Related Miscellanies
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [N41874] [vol.1] [ECCO]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
N41874
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T108889]
Publication Date:
1717
ESTC No:
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1 of 1
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Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T128848, Vol 1]
Publication Date:
1720
ESTC No:
T128848
Volume:
1 of 2
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Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T128848, Vol.2]
Publication Date:
1720
ESTC No:
T128848
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2 of 2
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Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T138611]
Publication Date:
1717
ESTC No:
T138611
Volume:
1 of 1
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Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T169738, Vol.1]
Publication Date:
1773
ESTC No:
T169738
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1 of 2
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Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T169738] [vol.2]
Publication Date:
1773
ESTC No:
T169738 [vol.2]
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T175634] [vol.1]
Publication Date:
1736
ESTC No:
T175634 [vol.1]
Volume:
1 of 2
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Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T175634] [vol.2] [ECCO]
Publication Date:
1736
ESTC No:
T175634
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99153] [Vol.1]
Publication Date:
1751
ESTC No:
T99153
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99153] [Vol.2]
Publication Date:
1751
ESTC No:
T99153
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99262, Vol 2]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
T99262
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
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Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99262] [Vol. 1]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
T99262
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Related People
Dedicatee:
Catherine Walpole (nee Shorter)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Mrs Walpole', engraved dedicatory plate to Book XII, N41874 [vol.2]
Publisher:
G. Ewing
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Dedicatee:
Diana Beauclerk (nee De Vere)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Grace the Dutchess of St. Alban's', engraved dedicatory plate to Book XV, N41874 [vol.2]
Dedicatee:
Dorothy Townshend (nee Walpole)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble the Lady Viscountess Townshend', Dedicatory engraving beginning Book XI, N41874 [vol.2]
Dedicatee:
Frances Scudamore (nee Digby)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble y Lady Viscountess Scudamore', engraved dedicatory plate to Book X, N41874 [vol.2]
Publisher:
G. Risk
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Dedicatee:
Juliana Boyle
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble the Countess of Burlington', Dedicatory engraving beginning Book XIV, N41874 [vol.2]
Dedicatee:
Lucy Clinton (nee Pelham)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble the Countess of Lincoln', Dedicatory engraving beginning Book IX, N41874 [vol.2]
Dedicatee:
Lucy Sherard
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Grace the Dutchess of Rutland', Dedicatory engraving beginning Book VIII, N41874 [vol.2]
Dedicatee:
Margaret Pelham
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Hon.ble Mrs. Margt. Pelham', Dedicatory engraving beginning Book XIII, N41874 [vol.2]
Printer:
S. Powell
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Editor:
Sir Samuel Garth
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Publisher:
W. Smith
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Content/Publication
First Line:
Now shone the morning star in bright array
Page No:
pp.1-8
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book VIII... The Story of Nisus and Scylla.
Attribution:
By Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Now Minos landed on the Cretan shore
Page No:
pp.8-9
Poem Title:
The Labyrinth.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
In tedious exile now too long detained
Page No:
pp.9-13
Poem Title:
The Story of Daedalus, and Icarus.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
From him the Caledonians sought relief
Page No:
pp.13-24
Poem Title:
The Story of Meleagar, and Atlanta.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Theseus meanwhile acquitting well his share
Page No:
pp.24-26
Poem Title:
The Transformation of the Naiads.
Attribution:
By Mr. Vernon
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
But yonder far lo yonder does appear
Page No:
p.27
Poem Title:
Perimele turn'd into an Island.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Thus Achelous ends his audience hear
Page No:
pp.28-33
Poem Title:
The Story of Baucis and Philemon.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
He ceased in his relation to proceed
Page No:
pp.33-34
Poem Title:
The Changes of Proteus.
Attribution:
Continu'd by Mr. Vernon
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
In various shapes thus to deceive the eyes
Page No:
pp.34-36
Poem Title:
The Story of Erisichthon.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Where frozen Scythia's utmost bound is placed
Page No:
pp.36-39
Poem Title:
The Description of Famine.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Now riches hoarded by paternal care
Page No:
pp.39-41
Poem Title:
The Transformations of Erisichthon's Daughter.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Theseus requests the god to tell his woes
Page No:
pp.43-47
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book IX... The Story of Achelous and Hercules.
Attribution:
By Mr. Gay
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
This virgin too thy love o Nessus found
Page No:
pp.47-48
Poem Title:
The Death of Nessus the Centaur.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Now a long interval of time succeeds
Page No:
pp.48-51
Poem Title:
The Death of Hercules.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
The hero said and with the torture stung
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Lychas into a Rock.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
But now the hero of immortal birth
Page No:
pp.52-53
Poem Title:
The Apotheosis of Hercules.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Atlas perceived the load of heaven's new guest
Page No:
pp.53-55
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Galanthis.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
She said and for her lost Galanthis sighs
Page No:
pp.55-58
Poem Title:
The Fable of Dryope.
Attribution:
By Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
While Iole the fatal change declares
Page No:
pp.58-59
Poem Title:
Iolaus restor'd to Youth.
Attribution:
Continu'd by Mr. Gay
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Now from her lips a solemn oath had passed
Page No:
p.59
Poem Title:
The Prophecy of Themis.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
When Themis thus with prescient voice had spoke
Page No:
pp.59-60
Poem Title:
The Debate of the Gods.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Let the sad fate of wretched Byblis prove
Page No:
pp.61-67
Poem Title:
The Passion of Byblis.
Attribution:
By Stephen Harvey, Esq
Attributed To:
Stephen Harvey
First Line:
The fame of this perhaps through Crete had flown
Page No:
pp.67-73
Poem Title:
The Fable of Iphis and Ianthe.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thence in his saffron robe for distant Thrace
Page No:
pp.75-80
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book X... The Story of Orpheus and Euridice.
Attribution:
By Mr. Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Amid the throng of this promiscuous wood
Page No:
pp.80-82
Poem Title:
The Fable of Cyparissus.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Congreve]
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Thus the sweet artist in a wondrous shade
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Continu'd by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Phoebus for thee too Hyacinth designed
Page No:
pp.83-85
Poem Title:
Hyacinthus transform'd into a Flower.
Attribution:
By Mr. Ozell
Attributed To:
John Ozell
First Line:
Enquire of Amathus whose wealthy ground
Page No:
pp.85-86
Poem Title:
The Transformations of the Cerastae, and Propaetides.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Ozell] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Ozell
First Line:
Pygmalion loathing their lascivious life
Page No:
pp.86-89
Poem Title:
The Story of Pygmalion, and the Statue.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Nor him alone produced the fruitful queen
Page No:
pp.89-100
Poem Title:
The Story of Cynyras and Myrrha.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
For Cytherea's lips while Cupid pressed
Page No:
pp.100-110
Poem Title:
The Story of Venus and Adonis.
Attribution:
By Mr. Eusden
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
Here while the Thracian bard's enchanting strain
Page No:
pp.111-114
Poem Title:
The Death of Orpheus.
Attribution:
By Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Bacchus resolving to revenge the wrong
Page No:
pp.114-115
Poem Title:
The Thracian Women transform'd to Trees.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Nor this sufficed the god's disgust remains
Page No:
pp.115-120
Poem Title:
The Fable of Midas.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Phoebus with full revenge from Tmolus flies
Page No:
pp.120-121
Poem Title:
The Building of Troy.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
For Proteus thus to virgin Thetis said
Page No:
pp.121-123
Poem Title:
The Story of Thetis, and Peleus, &c.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Peleus unmixed felicity enjoyed
Page No:
pp.123-126
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Daedalion.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e, Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
While they astonished heard the king relate
Page No:
pp.126-128
Poem Title:
A Wolf turn'd into Marble.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
These prodigies affect the pious prince
Page No:
pp.128-135
Poem Title:
The Story of Ceyx and Alcyone.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Near the Cymmerians in his dark abode
Page No:
pp.136-142
Poem Title:
The House of Sleep.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
These some old man sees wanton in the air
Page No:
pp.142-144
Poem Title:
Aesacus transform'd into a Cormorant.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Priam to whom the story was unknown
Page No:
pp.145-147
Poem Title:
The Trojan War.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Full in the midst of this created space
Page No:
pp.147-148
Poem Title:
The House of Fame.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
From these first onsets the Sigaean shore
Page No:
pp.148-152
Poem Title:
The Story of Cygnus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Then Nestor thus what once this age has known
Page No:
pp.152-154
Poem Title:
The Story of Caeneus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now brave Perithous bold Ixion's son
Page No:
pp.154-160
Poem Title:
The Skirmish between the Centaurs and Lapithites.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Nor could thy form o Cyllarus foreslow
Page No:
pp.160-163
Poem Title:
The Story of Cyllarus and Hylonome.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Already Caeneus with his conquering hand
Page No:
pp.163-166
Poem Title:
Caeneus transform'd to an Eagle.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
This tale by Nestor told did much displease
Page No:
pp.166-167
Poem Title:
The Fate of Periclymenos.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The sire of Cygnus monarch of the main
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
The Death of Achilles.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The chiefs were set the soldiers crowned the field
Page No:
pp.171-188
Poem Title:
The Speeches of Ajax and Ulysses.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
He who could often and alone withstand
Page No:
p.188
Poem Title:
The Death of Ajax.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The victor with full sails for Lemnos stood
Page No:
pp.189-195
Poem Title:
The Story of Polyxena and Hecuba.
Attribution:
By Mr. Temple Stanyan
Attributed To:
Temple Stanyan
First Line:
Yet bright Aurora partial as she was
Page No:
pp.195-198
Poem Title:
The Funeral of Memnon.
Attribution:
By Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Troy thus destroyed 'twas still denied by fate
Page No:
pp.198-203
Poem Title:
The Voyage of Aeneas.
Attribution:
By Mr. Catcott
Attributed To:
Alexander Stopford Catcott
First Line:
Acis the lovely youth whose loss I mourn
Page No:
pp.203-210
Poem Title:
The Story of Acis, Polyphemus, and Galatea.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Here ceased the nymph the fair assembly broke
Page No:
pp.210-213
Poem Title:
The Story of Glaucus, and Scylla.
Attribution:
By Mr. Rowe
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Now Glaucus with a lover's haste bounds over
Page No:
pp.215-217
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book XIV... The Transformation of Scylla.
Attribution:
Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Here bulged the pride of famed Ulysses' fleet
Page No:
p.217
Poem Title:
The Voyage of Aeneas continu'd.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now on his right he leaves Parthenope
Page No:
pp.218-219
Poem Title:
Aeneas descends to Hell.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
The galleys now by Pythecusa pass
Page No:
p.218
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Cercopians into Apes.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
I am no deity replied the dame
Page No:
pp.219-220
Poem Title:
The Story of the Sibyll.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Achaemenides with thanks I name
Page No:
pp.220-221
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Achaemenides.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Then Macareus there reigned a prince of fame
Page No:
p.221
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Macareus.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Before the spacious front a herd we find
Page No:
pp.222-223
Poem Title:
The Enchantments of Circe.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Picus who once the Ausonian sceptre held
Page No:
pp.223-226
Poem Title:
The Story of Picus and Canens.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Macareus now with a pious aim
Page No:
pp.226-227
Poem Title:
Aeneas arrives in Italy.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
After famed Ilium was by Argives won
Page No:
pp.227-228
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Diomedes.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Diomedes Venulus withdraws
Page No:
pp.228-229
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Appulus.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Meanwhile the Latians all their power prepare
Page No:
pp.229-230
Poem Title:
The Trojan Ships transform'd to Sea-Nymphs.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now had Aeneas as ordained by fate
Page No:
pp.231-232
Poem Title:
The Deification of Aeneas.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
A Hama-Dryad flourished in these days
Page No:
pp.232-235
Poem Title:
The Story of Vertumnus and Pomona.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Ascanius now the Latian sceptre sways
Page No:
p.232
Poem Title:
The Line of the Latian Kings.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Iphis of vulgar birth by chance had viewed
Page No:
pp.235-236
Poem Title:
The Story of Iphis and Anaxarete.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now Procas yielding to the fates his son
Page No:
pp.236-237
Poem Title:
The Latian Line continu'd.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Ere long the goddess of the nuptial bed
Page No:
pp.238-239
Poem Title:
The Assumption of Hersilia.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now warrior Mars his burnished helm puts on
Page No:
p.238
Poem Title:
The Assumption of Romulus.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
A king is sought to guide the growing state
Page No:
pp.241-262
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book XV... The Pythagorean Philosophy.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Advanced in years he died one common date
Page No:
pp.262-264
Poem Title:
The Story of Hippolytus.
Attribution:
By Mr. Catcott
Attributed To:
Alexander Stopford Catcott
First Line:
But others woes were useless to appease
Page No:
pp.264-265
Poem Title:
Egeria transform'd to a Fountain.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Catcott] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Alexander Stopford Catcott
First Line:
Or as when Cippus in the current viewed
Page No:
pp.265-267
Poem Title:
The Story of Cippus.
Attribution:
By Sir Samuel Garth, M. D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Melodious maids of Pindus who inspire
Page No:
pp.267-271
Poem Title:
The Occasion of Aesculapius being brought to Rome.
Attribution:
By Mr. Welsted
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
But Aesculapius was a foreign power
Page No:
pp.272-276
Poem Title:
The Deification of Julius Caesar.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Welsted] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
Thus raised his glorious offspring Julius viewed
Page No:
pp.276-277
Poem Title:
The Reign of Augustus, in which Ovid flourish'd.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Welsted] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
The work is finished which nor dreads the rage
Page No:
p.277
Poem Title:
The Poet concludes.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Welsted] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted