Blacklight

Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T138611]

DMI number:
593
Aliases
Ovid's Metamorphoses
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Evidence:
Publication Date:
1717
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
T138611
EEBO/ECCO link:
CW111474903
Shelfmark:
BL 74.k.8
Full Title:
OVID’s | METAMORPHOSES | IN | FIFTEEN BOOKS. | [i]Translated by the most Eminent [/i] HANDS. | [rule] | [rule] | Adorn’d with SCULPTURES. | [rule] | [rule] | [i]LONDON[/i]: | Printed for JACOB TONSON at [i]Shakespear’s-Head[/i] | over-against [i]Katharine-Street[/i] in the [i]Strand[/i]. | M DCC XVII.
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of translations/imitations
Format:
Folio
Pagination:
[6], [i]-xx, [4], 1-548.
Bibliographic details:
1st edition; Large paper issue. Off-set on (e.g.) pp. 173, 140, 252 - all pages now facing blank sides of engravings - suggests that the sheets were folded and stored whilst not quite dry before they were bound up with plates.
Comments:
PLATES: Frontispiece (unsigned) and facing sig.A1 (George Vertue after Godfrey Kneller), p.1 (Du Guernier), p.37 (Vandergucht), p.73 (unsigned), p.141 (Kirkall), p.175 (unsigned), p.213 (Kirkall), p.253 (Du Guernier), p.297 (Kirkall), p.331 (E Kirkall), p.371 (Smith), p.407 (Smith), p.435 (Kirkall), p.481 (Vandergucht), p.509 (Kirkall).
Other matter:
Prefatory matter: Engraved frontispiece; title-page; engraved dedicatory plate to the Princess of Wales; dedicatory epistle to Princess of Wales signed S.Garth [3pp.]; preface [pp.i-xx]; table of contents [4pp].
References:
David Hopkins, 'Dryden and the Garth-Tonson Metamorphoses', RES, New Series, Vol. XXXIX, No. 153 (1988).
Related Miscellanies
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T128848, Vol 1]
Publication Date:
1720
ESTC No:
T128848
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T128848, Vol.2]
Publication Date:
1720
ESTC No:
T128848
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99262, Vol 2]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
T99262
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99262] [Vol. 1]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
T99262
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [N41874 ] [vol.2] [ECCO]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
N41874
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [N41874] [vol.1] [ECCO]
Publication Date:
1727
ESTC No:
N41874
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T108889]
Publication Date:
1717
ESTC No:
T108889
Volume:
1 of 1
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T169738, Vol.1]
Publication Date:
1773
ESTC No:
T169738
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T169738] [vol.2]
Publication Date:
1773
ESTC No:
T169738 [vol.2]
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T175634] [vol.1]
Publication Date:
1736
ESTC No:
T175634 [vol.1]
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T175634] [vol.2] [ECCO]
Publication Date:
1736
ESTC No:
T175634
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99153] [Vol.1]
Publication Date:
1751
ESTC No:
T99153
Volume:
1 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses in fifteen books, translated by the most eminent hands [T99153] [Vol.2]
Publication Date:
1751
ESTC No:
T99153
Volume:
2 of 2
Relationship:
Unknown
Comments:
Related People
Dedicatee:
Charlotte Addison
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Right Honourable the Countess of Warwick', engraved dedicatory plate to Book V.
Dedicatee:
Diana Beauclerk (nee De Vere)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Grace the Dutchess of St. Alban's', engraved dedicatory plate to Book XV.
Dedicatee:
Dorothy Townshend (nee Walpole)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble ye Lady Viscountess Townshend', engraved dedicatory plate to Book XI.
Dedicatee:
Frances Scudamore (nee Digby)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble ye Lady Viscountess Scudamore', engraved dedicatory plate to Book X.
Dedicatee:
Harriet Pelham-Holles (nee Godolphin)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Grace the Dutchess of Newcastle', engraved dedicatory plate to Book III.
Dedicatee:
Isabella Pierrepont [nee Bentinck]
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Grace the Dutchess of Kingston', engraved dedicatory plate to Book I.
Dedicatee:
Juliana Boyle
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble the Countess of Burlington', engraved dedicatory plate to Book XIV.
Dedicatee:
Lucy Clinton (nee Pelham)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.bl the Countess of Lincoln', engraved dedicatory plate to Book IX.
Dedicatee:
Lucy Sherard
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Grace the Dutchess of Rutland', engraved dedicatory plate to Book VIII.
Dedicatee:
Margaret Pelham
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Honourable Mrs. Margaret Pelham', engraved dedicatory plate to Book XIII.
Dedicatee:
Mary Ker (nee Finch)
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Grace the Dutchess of Roxburghe', engraved dedicatory plate to Book II.
Dedicatee:
Princess Anne
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To Her Highness the Princess Anne Eldest Daughter of Their Royal Highnesses ye Prince & Princess of Wales', engraved dedicatory plate to Book VI.
Dedicatee:
Queen of Great Britain Caroline
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales', engraved dedicatory plate.
Dedicatee:
Sarah Cowper
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'To the Rt. Hon.ble the Lady Cowper', engraved dedicatory plate to Book VII.
Editor:
Sir Samuel Garth
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Engraver:
Elisha Kirkall
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Engraver:
George Vertue
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Engraver:
Gerard Vandergucht
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Engraver:
Louis Du Guernier
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Engraver:
R. Smith
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
Publisher:
Jacob Tonson
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Printed for JACOB TONSON at Shakespear’s-Head over-against Katharine-Street in the Strand.'
Content/Publication
First Line:
Of bodies changed to various forms I sing
Page No:
pp.1-4
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book I.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The golden age was first when man yet new
Page No:
p.5
Poem Title:
The Golden Age.
Attribution:
Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Book I. Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
But when good Saturn banished from above
Page No:
p.6
Poem Title:
The Silver Age.
Attribution:
Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Book I. Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Hard steel succeeded then
Page No:
pp.6-7
Poem Title:
The Iron Age.
Attribution:
Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Book I. Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
To this came next in course the brazen age
Page No:
p.6
Poem Title:
The Brazen Age.
Attribution:
Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Book I. Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Nor were the gods themselves more safe above
Page No:
pp.7-20
Poem Title:
The Gyants War.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The first and fairest of his loves was she
Page No:
pp.20-26
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Daphne into a Lawrel.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
An ancient forest in Thessalia grows
Page No:
pp.26-30
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Io into a Heyfar.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now Jove no longer could her sufferings bear
Page No:
pp.30-31
Poem Title:
The Eyes of Argus Transform'd into a Peacock's Train.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Then Hermes thus a nymph of late there was
Page No:
pp.31-36
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Syrinx into Reeds.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. John Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The sun's bright palace on high columns raised
Page No:
pp.37-49
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book II... The Story of Phaeton.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
The Latian nymphs came round him and amazed
Page No:
pp.49-51
Poem Title:
Phaeton's Sisters transform'd into Trees.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Cycnus beheld the nymphs transformed allied
Page No:
pp.51-52
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Cycnus into a Swan.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
The day was settled in its course and Jove
Page No:
pp.53-58
Poem Title:
The Story of Calisto.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
The raven once in snowy plumes was dressed
Page No:
pp.58-62
Poem Title:
The Story of Coronis, and Birth of Aesculapius.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Old Chiron took the babe with secret joy
Page No:
pp.62-64
Poem Title:
Ocyrrhoe transform'd into a Mare.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Sore wept the centaur and to Phoebus prayed
Page No:
pp.64-65
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Battus to a Touch-stone.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
This done the god flew up on high and passed
Page No:
pp.65-70
Poem Title:
The Story of Aglauros transform'd into a Statue.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
When now the god his fury had allayed
Page No:
pp.70-72
Poem Title:
Europa's Rape.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
When now Agenor had his daughter lost
Page No:
pp.73-79
Poem Title:
The Story of Cadmus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
In a fair chase a shady mountain stood
Page No:
pp.79-82
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Actaeon into a Stag.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Actaeon's sufferings and Diana's rage
Page No:
pp.83-86
Poem Title:
The Birth of Bacchus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Twas now while these transactions passed on earth
Page No:
pp.86-87
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Tiresias.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Famed far and near for knowing things to come
Page No:
pp.87-88
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Echo.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Thus did the nymphs in vain caress the boy
Page No:
pp.89-93
Poem Title:
The Story of Narcissus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
This sad event gave blind Tiresias fame
Page No:
pp.93-95
Poem Title:
The Story of Pentheus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Him Pentheus viewed with fury in his look
Page No:
pp.95-99
Poem Title:
The Mariners transform'd to Dolphins.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
But Pentheus grown more furious than before
Page No:
pp.99-100
Poem Title:
The Death of Pentheus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
Yet still Alcithoe perverse remains
Page No:
pp.101-104
Poem Title:
The Story of Alcithoe and her Sisters.
Attribution:
By Mr. Eusden
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
In Babylon where first her Queen for state
Page No:
pp.104-109
Poem Title:
The Story of Pyramus and Thisbe.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
The sun the source of light by beauty's power
Page No:
pp.109-113
Poem Title:
The Story of Leucothoe and the Sun.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
Though guilty Clytie thus the sun betrayed
Page No:
pp.114-115
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Clytie.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
How Salmacis with weak enfeebling streams
Page No:
pp.115-119
Poem Title:
The Story of Salmacis and Hermaphroditus.
Attribution:
By Mr. Addison
Attributed To:
Joseph Addison
First Line:
But Mineus' daughters still their tasks pursue
Page No:
pp.119-120
Poem Title:
Alcithoe and her Sisters transform'd to Bats.
Attribution:
Continued by Mr. Eusden
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
The power of Bacchus now over Thebes had flown
Page No:
pp.120-127
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Ino and Melicerta to Sea-Gods.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
The Theban matrons their loved Queen pursued
Page No:
pp.127-128
Poem Title:
The Transformation of the Theban Matrons.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e, Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
Mean time the wretched Cadmus mourns nor knows
Page No:
pp.128-130
Poem Title:
Cadmus and his Queen transform'd to Serpents.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
Thence Perseus like a cloud by storms was driven
Page No:
pp.130-132
Poem Title:
Atlas transform'd to a Mountain.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
Yet though this harsh inglorious fate they found
Page No:
p.130
Poem Title:
The Story of Perseus.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
Now Aeolus had with strong chains confined
Page No:
pp.132-137
Poem Title:
Andromeda rescued from the Sea-Monster.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
The hero with his just request complies
Page No:
pp.137-139
Poem Title:
The Story of Medusa's Head.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e, Eusden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
While Perseus entertained with this report
Page No:
pp.141-153
Poem Title:
The Story of Perseus continued.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Thus far Minerva was content to rove
Page No:
pp.153-154
Poem Title:
Minerva's Interview with the Muses.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Then one replies o goddess fit to guide
Page No:
pp.154-156
Poem Title:
The Fate of Pyreneus.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
The muse yet spoke when they began to hear
Page No:
pp.156-157
Poem Title:
The Story of the Pierides.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Then rises one of the presumptuous throng
Page No:
pp.157-158
Poem Title:
The Song of the Pierides.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
First Ceres taught the labouring hind to plow
Page No:
pp.158-160
Poem Title:
The Song of the Muses.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Near Enna's walls a spacious lake is spread
Page No:
pp.160-162
Poem Title:
The Rape of Proserpine.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
But still does Cyane the rape bemoan
Page No:
p.162
Poem Title:
Cyane dissolves to a Fountain.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Thus while through all the earth and all the main
Page No:
pp.163-167
Poem Title:
A Boy transform'd to an Eft.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
The goddess now resolving to succeed
Page No:
pp.167-168
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Ascalaphus into an Owl.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Justly this punishment was due to him
Page No:
pp.168-169
Poem Title:
The Daughters of Achelous transform'd to Sirens.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Still were the purling waters and the maid
Page No:
pp.169-173
Poem Title:
The Story of Arethusa.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
The youth over Europe and over Asia drives
Page No:
p.173
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Lyncus.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
The chosen muse here ends her sacred lays
Page No:
p.174
Poem Title:
The Pierides transform'd to Magpies.
Attribution:
Translated by Arthur Maynwaring, Esq
Attributed To:
Arthur Maynwaring
First Line:
Pallas attending to the muse's song
Page No:
pp.175-181
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Swift through the Phrygian towns the rumour flies
Page No:
pp.182-189
Poem Title:
The Story of Niobe
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Then all reclaimed by this example showed
Page No:
pp.189-192
Poem Title:
The Peasants of Lycia transform'd to Frogs.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Widowed and childless lamentable state
Page No:
p.189
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Niobe.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
From these relations straight the people turn
Page No:
pp.193-194
Poem Title:
The Story of Pelops.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Scarce had the man this famous story told
Page No:
p.193
Poem Title:
The Fate of Marsyas.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
To Thebes the neighbouring princes all repair
Page No:
pp.194-209
Poem Title:
The Story of Tereus, Procne, and Philomela.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Erechtheus next the Athenian sceptre swayed
Page No:
pp.209-211
Poem Title:
Boreas in Love.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
The Argonauts now stemmed the foaming tide
Page No:
pp.213-217
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book VII... The Story of Medea and Jason.
Attribution:
'by Mr. Tate', contents page attribution
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Impatient for the wonders of the day
Page No:
pp.218-220
Poem Title:
The Dragon's Teeth transform'd to Men.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Tate] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Aemonian matrons who their absence mourned
Page No:
pp.221-227
Poem Title:
Old Aeson restor'd to Youth.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Tate] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Thus far obliging love employed her art
Page No:
pp.227-232
Poem Title:
The Death of Pelias.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Tate] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
From hence to Athens she directs her flight
Page No:
pp.232-238
Poem Title:
The Story of Aegeus.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Tate] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
A dreadful plague from angry Juno came
Page No:
pp.238-245
Poem Title:
The Story of Ants chang'd to Men.
Attribution:
By Mr. Stonestreet
Attributed To:
William Stonestreet
First Line:
To the inmost courts the Grecian youths were led
Page No:
pp.245-251
Poem Title:
The Story of Cephalus and Procris.
Attribution:
by Mr. Tate [contents page]
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
With such discourse they entertain the day
Page No:
p.245
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Continu'd by Mr. Tate
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Now shone the morning star in bright array
Page No:
pp.253-260
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book VIII... The Story of Nisus and Scylla.
Attribution:
By Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Now Minos landed on the Cretan shore
Page No:
pp.260-262
Poem Title:
The Labyrinth.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
In tedious exile now too long detained
Page No:
pp.262-266
Poem Title:
The Story of Daedalus and Icarus.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
From him the Caledonians sought relief
Page No:
pp.266-279
Poem Title:
The Story of Meleagar and Atlanta.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Theseus meanwhile acquitting well his share
Page No:
pp.279-281
Poem Title:
The Transformation of the Naiads.
Attribution:
By Mr. Vernon
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
But yonder far lo yonder does appear
Page No:
pp.281-282
Poem Title:
Perimele turn'd into an Island.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Thus Achelous ends his audience hear
Page No:
pp.282-288
Poem Title:
The Story of Baucis and Philemon.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
He ceased in his relation to proceed
Page No:
p.289
Poem Title:
The Changes of Proteus.
Attribution:
Continu'd by Mr. Vernon
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
In various shapes thus to deceive the eyes
Page No:
pp.289-292
Poem Title:
The Story of Erisichthon.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Where frozen Scythia's utmost bound is placed
Page No:
pp.292-294
Poem Title:
The Description of Famine.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Now riches hoarded by paternal care
Page No:
pp.295-296
Poem Title:
The Transformations of Erisichthon's Daughter.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Vernon] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Thomas Vernon
First Line:
Theseus requests the god to tell his woes
Page No:
pp.297-301
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book IX... The Story of Achelous and Hercules.
Attribution:
By Mr. Gay
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
This virgin too thy love o Nessus found
Page No:
pp.301-302
Poem Title:
The Death of Nessus the Centaur.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Now a long interval of time succeeds
Page No:
pp.302-305
Poem Title:
The Death of Hercules.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
The hero said and with the torture stung
Page No:
pp.305-306
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Lychas into a Rock.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
But now the hero of immortal birth
Page No:
pp.306-308
Poem Title:
The Apotheosis of Hercules.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Atlas perceived the load of heaven's new guest
Page No:
pp.308-310
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Galanthis.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
She said and for her lost Galanthis sighs
Page No:
pp.310-313
Poem Title:
The Fable of Dryope.
Attribution:
By Mr. Pope
Attributed To:
Alexander Pope
First Line:
Now from her lips a solemn oath had passed
Page No:
pp.314-315
Poem Title:
The Prophecy of Themis.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
While Iole the fatal change declares
Page No:
p.314
Poem Title:
Iolaus restor'd to Youth.
Attribution:
Continu'd by Mr. Gay
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
When Themis thus with prescient voice had spoke
Page No:
pp.315-316
Poem Title:
The Debate of the Gods.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Gay] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Gay
First Line:
Let the sad fate of wretched Byblis prove
Page No:
pp.316-323
Poem Title:
The Passion of Byblis.
Attribution:
By Stephen Harvey, Esq
Attributed To:
Stephen Harvey
First Line:
The fame of this perhaps through Crete had flown
Page No:
pp.323-330
Poem Title:
The Fable of Iphis and Ianthe.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thence in his saffron robe for distant Thrace
Page No:
pp.331-336
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book X... The Story of Orpheus and Eurydice.
Attribution:
By Mr. Congreve
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Amid the throng of this promiscuous wood
Page No:
pp.336-338
Poem Title:
The Fable of Cyparissus.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Congreve]
Attributed To:
William Congreve
First Line:
Thus the sweet artist in a wondrous shade
Page No:
pp.338-339
Poem Title:
[no title]
Attribution:
Continu'd by Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Phoebus for thee too Hyacinth designed
Page No:
pp.339-341
Poem Title:
Hyacinthus transform'd into a Flower.
Attribution:
By Mr. Ozell
Attributed To:
John Ozell
First Line:
Enquire of Amathus whose wealthy ground
Page No:
pp.341-342
Poem Title:
The Transformations of the Cerastae, and Propaetides.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Ozell] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Ozell
First Line:
Pygmalion loathing their lascivious life
Page No:
pp.343-346
Poem Title:
The Story of Pygmalion, and the Statue.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Nor him alone produced the fruitful queen
Page No:
pp.346-358
Poem Title:
The Story of Cinyras, and Myrrha.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
For Cytherea's lips while Cupid pressed
Page No:
pp.358-369
Poem Title:
The Story of Venus, and Adonis.
Attribution:
By Mr. Eusden
Attributed To:
Laurence Eusden
First Line:
Here while the Thracian bard's enchanting strain
Page No:
pp.371-374
Poem Title:
The Death of Orpheus.
Attribution:
By Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Bacchus resolving to revenge the wrong
Page No:
pp.374-375
Poem Title:
The Thracian Women transform'd to Trees.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e., Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Nor this sufficed the god's disgust remains
Page No:
pp.375-380
Poem Title:
The Fable of Midas.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Phoebus with full revenge from Tmolus flies
Page No:
pp.381-382
Poem Title:
The Building of Troy.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
For Proteus thus to virgin Thetis said
Page No:
pp.382-384
Poem Title:
The Story of Thetis and Peleus, &c.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Peleus unmixed felicity enjoyed
Page No:
pp.384-387
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Daedalion.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e, Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
While they astonished heard the king relate
Page No:
pp.387-389
Poem Title:
A Wolf turn'd into Marble.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Croxall] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
These prodigies affect the pious prince
Page No:
pp.389-398
Poem Title:
The Story of Ceyx and Alcyone.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Near the Cymmerians in his dark abode
Page No:
pp.398-405
Poem Title:
The House of Sleep.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
These some old man sees wanton in the air
Page No:
pp.405-406
Poem Title:
Aesacus transform'd into a Cormorant.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Priam to whom the story was unknown
Page No:
pp.407-409
Poem Title:
The Trojan War.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Full in the midst of this created space
Page No:
pp.409-410
Poem Title:
The House of Fame.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
From these first onsets the Sigaean shore
Page No:
pp.410-414
Poem Title:
The Story of Cygnus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Then Nestor thus what once this age has known
Page No:
pp.415-416
Poem Title:
The Story of Caeneus.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now brave Perithous bold Ixion's son
Page No:
pp.416-424
Poem Title:
The Skirmish between the Centaurs and Lapithites.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Nor could thy form o Cyllarus foreslow
Page No:
pp.424-426
Poem Title:
The Story of Cyllarus and Hylonome.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Already Caeneus with his conquering hand
Page No:
pp.427-430
Poem Title:
Caeneus transform'd to an Eagle.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
This tale by Nestor told did much displease
Page No:
pp.430-431
Poem Title:
The Fate of Periclymenos.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The sire of Cygnus monarch of the main
Page No:
pp.432-434
Poem Title:
The Death of Achilles.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The chiefs were set the soldiers crowned the field
Page No:
pp.435-454
Poem Title:
The Speeches of Ajax and Ulysses.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
He who could often and alone withstand
Page No:
p.454
Poem Title:
The Death of Ajax.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Dryden] [contents page]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The victor with full sails for Lemnos stood
Page No:
pp.454-462
Poem Title:
The Story of Polyxena and Hecuba.
Attribution:
By Mr. Temple Stanyan
Attributed To:
Temple Stanyan
First Line:
Yet bright Aurora partial as she was
Page No:
pp.462-464
Poem Title:
The Funeral of Memnon.
Attribution:
By Mr. Croxall
Attributed To:
Samuel Croxall
First Line:
Troy thus destroyed 'twas still denied by fate
Page No:
pp.464-470
Poem Title:
The Voyage of Aeneas.
Attribution:
By Mr. Catcott
Attributed To:
Alexander Stopford Catcott
First Line:
Acis the lovely youth whose loss I mourn
Page No:
pp.470-477
Poem Title:
The Story of Acis, Polyphemus, and Galatea.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Here ceased the nymph the fair assembly broke
Page No:
pp.477-480
Poem Title:
The Story of Glaucus and Scylla.
Attribution:
By Mr. Rowe
Attributed To:
Nicholas Rowe
First Line:
Now Glaucus with a lover's haste bounds over
Page No:
pp.481-483
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book XIV... The Transformation of Scylla.
Attribution:
Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Here bulged the pride of famed Ulysses' fleet
Page No:
pp.483-484
Poem Title:
The Voyage of Aeneas continued.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now on his right he leaves Parthenope
Page No:
pp.484-485
Poem Title:
Aeneas descends to Hell.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
The galleys now by Pythecusa pass
Page No:
p.484
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Cercopians into Apes.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
I am no deity replied the dame
Page No:
pp.485-486
Poem Title:
The Story of the Sibyll.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Achaemenides with thanks I name
Page No:
pp.486-487
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Achaemenides.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Then Macareus there reigned a prince of fame
Page No:
pp.487-488
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Macareus.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Before the spacious front a herd we find
Page No:
pp.488-489
Poem Title:
The Enchantments of Circe.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Picus who once the Ausonian sceptre held
Page No:
pp.489-493
Poem Title:
The Story of Picus and Canens.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Macareus now with a pious aim
Page No:
pp.493-494
Poem Title:
Aeneas arrives in Italy.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
After famed Ilium was by Argives won
Page No:
pp.494-495
Poem Title:
The Adventures of Diomedes.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Meanwhile the Latians all their power prepare
Page No:
pp.496- 498
Poem Title:
The Trojan Ships transform'd to Sea-Nymphs.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Thus Diomedes Venulus withdraws
Page No:
p.496
Poem Title:
The Transformation of Appulus.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now had Aeneas as ordained by fate
Page No:
pp.498-499
Poem Title:
The Deification of Aeneas.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Ascanius now the Latian sceptre sways
Page No:
p.499
Poem Title:
The Line of the Latian Kings.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
A Hama-Dryad flourished in these days
Page No:
pp.500-502
Poem Title:
The Story of Vertumnus and Pomona.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Iphis of vulgar birth by chance had viewed
Page No:
pp.502-504
Poem Title:
The Story of Iphis and Anaxarete.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now Procas yielding to the fates his son
Page No:
pp.504-505
Poem Title:
The Latian Line continu'd.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Now warrior Mars his burnished helm puts on
Page No:
pp.505-506
Poem Title:
The Assumption of Romulus.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Ere long the goddess of the nuptial bed
Page No:
pp.506-507
Poem Title:
The Assumption of Hersilia.
Attribution:
Book XIV. Translated by Sir Samuel Garth, M.D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
A king is sought to guide the growing state
Page No:
pp.509-531
Poem Title:
Ovid's Metamorphoses. Book XV... The Pythagorean Philosophy.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Advanced in years he died one common date
Page No:
pp.532-534
Poem Title:
The Story of Hippolytus.
Attribution:
By Mr. Catcott
Attributed To:
Alexander Stopford Catcott
First Line:
But others woes were useless to appease
Page No:
pp.534-535
Poem Title:
Egeria transform'd to a Fountain.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Catcott] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Alexander Stopford Catcott
First Line:
Or as when Cippus in the current viewed
Page No:
pp.535-537
Poem Title:
The Story of Cippus.
Attribution:
By Sir Samuel Garth, M. D.
Attributed To:
Sir Samuel Garth
First Line:
Melodious maids of Pindus who inspire
Page No:
pp.537-542
Poem Title:
The Occasion of Aesculapius being brought to Rome.
Attribution:
By Mr. Welsted
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
But Aesculapius was a foreign power
Page No:
pp.542-547
Poem Title:
The Deification of Julius Caesar.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Welsted] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
Thus raised his glorious offspring Julius viewed
Page No:
pp.547-548
Poem Title:
The Reign of Augustus, in which Ovid flourish'd.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Welsted] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted
First Line:
The work is finished which nor dreads the rage
Page No:
p.548
Poem Title:
The Poet concludes.
Attribution:
by the same Hand [i.e. Welsted] [contents page]
Attributed To:
Leonard Welsted