Blacklight

Miscellany poems: in two parts [ESTC R31378]

DMI number:
1647
Aliases
Dryden/Tonson Miscellany Poems. Volume 1 and Volume 2.
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Evidence:
Publication Date:
1692
Volume Number:
1 of 1
ESTC number:
R31378
EEBO/ECCO link:
http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?ctx_ver=Z39.88-2003&res_id=xri:eebo&rft_id=xri:eebo:citation:11951076
Shelfmark:
EEBO - Bod
Full Title:
[i]MISCELLANY POEMS:[/i] | In Two Parts. | [rule] | Containing New | TRANSLATIONS | OUT OF | [two columns with curly braces in centre] [i]VIRGIL, OVID, | LUCRETIUS, THEOCRITUS, | HORACE[/i], And other Authours. | With Several | ORIGINAL POEMS. | [rule] | [i]By the Most Eminent Hands[/i]. | [rule] | Published by Mr. [i]DRYDEN[/i]. | [rule] | [epigraph] | [rule] | [g]The Second Edition.[/g] | [rule] | [i]LONDON[/i], | Printed for [i]Jacob Tonson[/i], and are to be Sold by [i]Joseph | Hindmarsh[/i], at the [i]Golden-Ball[/i] in [i]Cornhill[/i], 1692.
Epigraph:
[i]Et Vos, O[/i] Lauri, [i]carpam, & Te, proxima[/i] Myrte: | [i]Sic positae quoniam suaveis miscetis odores[/i]. Virg. [i]Ecl[/i]. 2.
Place of Publication:
London
Genres:
Collection of literary verse, Collection of translations/imitations, Collection of 17th century verse, Made-up miscellany, and Collection includes verse in other languages
Format:
Octavo
Bibliographic details:
CHECK: pp. 168-171 are duplicated in EEBO facsimile. Last word of first line of 'The Parting of Sireno and Diana' is obscured in both images. 'Absalom And Achitophel' has separate title page: p. [13]. Title page states 'The Seventh Edition; Augmented and Revised' and bears date '1692'. Pagination and register are continuous. 'The Medall' has separate title page: p. [73]. Title page states 'The Third Edition' and bears date '1692'. Pagination and register are continuous. 'Virgil's Eclogues. Translated by Several Hands.' has separate title page dated '1692': p. [321]. Pagination and register are continuous. 'Sylvae: Or, The Second Part Of Poetical Miscellanies.' has separate title page: SYLVAE: | OR, THE | [g]Second Part[/g] | OF | POETICAL | Miscellanies. | [rule] | ---[i]Non deficit alter | Aureus; & simili frondescit virga metallo[/i]. Virg. | [rule] | [i]LONDON[/i], | Printed for [i]Jacob Tonson[/i], at the [i]Judges-Head[/i] | in [i]Chancery-lane[/i] near [i]Fleetstreet[/i], 1685. Pagination and register are separate.
Comments:
CONTENTS: Part One: 'Miscellany Poems' (1) Three poems by Dryden, pp. 1-102. 'Absalom And Achitophel' has separate dated title page (p. [13]) and prefatory address 'To The Reader' in prose (pp. 15-18). 'The Medall' has separate dated title page (p. [73]) and prefatory 'Epistle To the Whigs' in prose (pp. 75-81). (2) 'Several Of Ovid's Elegies, Book I.', pp. 103-19. (3) 'Several Of Ovid's Elegies, Book II.', pp. 120-41. (4) 'Several Of Ovid's Elegies, Book III.', pp. 142-66. (5) Miscellaneous poems and translations, pp. 167-262. Includes a series of versions of Horatian odes, pp. 194-211. (6) Prologues and epilogues, pp. 260-94. (7) Miscellaneous poems and translations, pp. 295-320. Includes a series of versions of Horatian poems, pp. 306-318. (8) 'Virgil's Eclogues. Translated By Several Hands.', pp. 323-407. Separate dated title page p. [321]. Part Two: 'Sylvae' (1) Translations from Virgil, Lucretius and others by Dryden, pp. 1-127. (2) Miscellaneous poems and translations, pp. 128-68. (3) Translations from Theocritus, Catullus and others, pp. 353-448 (pagination jumps from 168 to 353). (4) Miscellaneous poems and translations, pp. 449-94. Includes a Latin poem, 'Horti Arlingtoniani', addressed to Henry Bennet, first earl of Arlington (1618-1685), and attributed to 'Mr Charles Dryden' in the table of contents: pp. 457-64. Duplicate poem: poem ID 41868 appears twice in this miscellany, pp. 136-38 (in first part) and 397-98 (in second part).
Other matter:
First part: (1) 'A Table Of The Poems In the Following Miscellanea', fols 2r-4v (unpaged and unsigned). Second part: (1) 'Preface' signed 'John Dryden', sigs A2r-a8v (gathering A is immediately followed by a). (2) 'A Table Of The Poems, Contained In the Second Part of Miscellany Poems', sigs b1r-b4r.
References:
NCBEL 338 (1692)
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Another Edition of
Comments:
Title:
The sixth part of miscellany poems [ecco] [T117014]
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1727
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T117014
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Comments:
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The third part of miscellany poems [ecco] [T117014]
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1727
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The third part of miscellany poems [N49205]
Publication Date:
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Comments:
Related People
Editor:
John Dryden
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Published by Mr. Dryden'.
Publisher:
Jacob Tonson
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'Printed for Jacob Tonson'.
Sold by:
Joseph Hindmarsh
Confidence:
Absolute (100%)
Comments:
'to be Sold by Joseph Hindmarsh'.
Content/Publication
First Line:
All human things are subject to decay
Page No:
pp.1-11
Poem Title:
Mac Flecknoe.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Take it as earnest of a faith renewed
Page No:
pp.19-20
Poem Title:
To The Unknown Authour Of This Excellent Poem.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I thought forgive my sin the boasted fire
Page No:
pp.21-22
Poem Title:
To The Unknown Authour Of This Admirable Poem.
Attribution:
R. D.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
Hail heaven born muse Hail every sacred page
Page No:
pp.23-24
Poem Title:
To The Conceal'd Authour Of This Incomparable Poem.
Attribution:
N. T.
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
In pious times ere priestcraft did begin
Page No:
pp.25-72
Poem Title:
Absalom And Achitophel. A Poem.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Once more our awful poet arms to engage
Page No:
pp.82-83
Poem Title:
Upon The Authour Of the Following Poem.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thus pious ignorance with dubious praise
Page No:
pp.84-86
Poem Title:
To The Unknown Authour Of the Following Poem, And that of Absalom and Achitophel.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all our antic sights and pageantry
Page No:
pp.87-102
Poem Title:
The Medal. A Satyre Against Sedition.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
In lofty strains said I some mighty thing
Page No:
pp.103-105
Poem Title:
Elegy the First.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Cooper.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ah me why am I so uneasy grown
Page No:
pp.105-108
Poem Title:
Elegy the Second.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Since to constrain our joys that ill bred rude
Page No:
pp.108-111
Poem Title:
Elegy the Fourth. Instructions to his Mrs. how to behave her self at Supper before her Husband.
Attribution:
Englished by Sir Ch. Scrope.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Twas noon when I scorched with the double fire
Page No:
pp.112-113
Poem Title:
Elegy the Fifth.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
There is a bawd renowned in Venus' wars
Page No:
pp.114-119
Poem Title:
Elegy the Eighth. He Curses a Bawd, for going about to debauch his Mistress.
Attribution:
Englished by Sir Ch. Sidly.
Attributed To:
Sir Charles Sedley
First Line:
Cupid begone who would on thee rely
Page No:
pp.120-123
Poem Title:
Elegy the Fifth. To his false Mistress
Attribution:
Englished by Sir Ch. Sidly.
Attributed To:
Sir Charles Sedley
First Line:
Alas poor Poll my Indian talker dies
Page No:
pp.123-126
Poem Title:
Elegy the Sixth.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
And must I still be guilty still untrue
Page No:
pp.127-129
Poem Title:
Elegy the Seventh. He protests that he had never any thing to doe with the Chamber-maid.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Dear skilful Betty who dost far excel
Page No:
pp.130-131
Poem Title:
Elegy the Eighth. ... To Corinna's Chamber-maid.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Thou to whom every artful dress is known
Page No:
pp.132-133
Poem Title:
Elegy the Eighth. ... To his Mistris's Maid.
Attribution:
Englished by another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
O love how cold and slow to take my part
Page No:
pp.133-136
Poem Title:
Elegy the Ninth. ... To Love.
Attribution:
Englished by the late Earl of Rochester.
Attributed To:
John Wilmot
First Line:
Triumphant laurels round my temples twine
Page No:
pp.136-138
Poem Title:
Elegy the Twelfth.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
If for thy self thou wilt not watch thy whore
Page No:
pp.138-141
Poem Title:
Elegy the Nineteenth.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Vex not thy self and her vain man since all
Page No:
pp.142-144
Poem Title:
Elegy the Fourth. To a Man that lockt up his Wife.
Attribution:
Englished by Sir Ch. Sidly.
Attributed To:
Sir Charles Sedley
First Line:
Twas night and sleep had closed my wearied eyes
Page No:
pp.145-148
Poem Title:
Elegy the Fifth. Ovid's Dream.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Thy course thy noble course a while forbear
Page No:
pp.148-151
Poem Title:
Elegy the Sixth. To a River, as he was going to his Mistress.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Rimer.
Attributed To:
Thomas Rymer
First Line:
If Memnon's fate bewailed with constant dew
Page No:
pp.152-156
Poem Title:
Elegy the Ninth. Upon the Death of Tibullus.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Stepny.
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
I can allow such charms inconstancy
Page No:
pp.157-159
Poem Title:
Elegy the Thirteenth. To his Mistress, desiring her that (if she will be false to him) she wou'd manage her Intrigues with Secresie.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Tate.
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
I do not ask you would to me prove true
Page No:
pp.160-163
Poem Title:
Elegy the Thirteenth. He desires his Mistress if she does Cuckold him not to let him know it.
Attribution:
Englished by another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
This too I sing this love commanded too
Page No:
pp.163-165
Poem Title:
Elegy the First Of the Second Book. That He can write of nothing but Love.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Adams.
Attributed To:
Mr. Adams
First Line:
Thou that the finger of my fair shalt bind
Page No:
pp.165-166
Poem Title:
Elegy the Fifteenth Of the Second Book. On a Ring sent to his Mistress.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Adams.
Attributed To:
Mr. Adams
First Line:
Tis not for nothing when just heaven does frown
Page No:
pp.167-170
Poem Title:
Part Of Virgil's IV. Georgick.
Attribution:
Englished by the E. of M.
Attributed To:
John Sheffield
First Line:
Close by a stream whose flowery bank might give
Page No:
pp.171-177
Poem Title:
The Parting Of Sireno and Diana.
Attribution:
Englished by Sir C. Scrope.
Attributed To:
Sir Carr Scrope
First Line:
Now Tarquin the last king did govern Rome
Page No:
pp.178-187
Poem Title:
The Story of Lucretia Out Of Ovid de Fastis. Book II.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Be gone you slaves you idle vermin go
Page No:
pp.188-190
Poem Title:
On Mr. Dryden's Religio Laici.
Attribution:
By the Earl of Roscomon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Those gods the pious ancients did adore
Page No:
pp.191-193
Poem Title:
To Mr. Dryden On His Religio Laici.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Virtue dear friend needs no defence
Page No:
pp.194-195
Poem Title:
The XXII. Ode. Of The First Book Of Horace.
Attribution:
Roscomon
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Those ills your ancestors have done
Page No:
pp.196-199
Poem Title:
The VI. Ode. Of The Third Book Of Horace. Of the Corruption of the Times.
Attribution:
Roscomon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
Conquered with soft and pleasing charms
Page No:
pp.200-203
Poem Title:
The IV. Ode. Of The First Book Of Horace.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Blush not my friend to own the love
Page No:
pp.204-205
Poem Title:
The IV. Ode. Of The Second Book Of Horace.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
If ever any injured power
Page No:
pp.206-207
Poem Title:
The VIII. Ode. Of The Second Book Of Horace.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
Whilst I was welcome to your heart
Page No:
pp.208-209
Poem Title:
Horace and Lydia. The IX. Ode.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
While I remained the darling of your heart
Page No:
pp.210-211
Poem Title:
A Dialogue Between Horace and Lydia.
Attribution:
Englished by another Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As on the beach sad Ariadne lay
Page No:
pp.212-214
Poem Title:
The III. Elegy Of the first Book of Propertius.
Attribution:
Englished By Mr. Adams.
Attributed To:
Mr. Adams
First Line:
Tis but a short but a filthy pleasure
Page No:
pp.214-215
Poem Title:
Out Of Petronius Arbiter.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My much loved friend | When thou art from my eyes
Page No:
pp.215-221
Poem Title:
Epistle To R. D. from T. O.
Attribution:
from T. O.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
A youth once free and happy now a slave
Page No:
pp.222-224
Poem Title:
A Letter to a Friend.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I praised and loved by the best youth of Rome
Page No:
pp.225-231
Poem Title:
An Elegy By The Wife of St. Alexias (a Nobleman of Rome) complaining on his absence, he having left her on his Wedding Night unenjoy'd, out of a Pious Zeal to go visit the Christian Churches. Written in Latin by Fran. Remond a Jesuit.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
To Amaryllis love compels my way
Page No:
pp.232-238
Poem Title:
Amaryllis, Or the Third Idyllium Of Theocritus, Paraphras'd.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The philters Thestylis and charms prepare
Page No:
pp.239-249
Poem Title:
Pharmaceutria, Or The Enchantress. ... Translated from Theocritus.
Attribution:
By Mr. William Bowles, of King's College in Cambridge.
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
O Short no herb no salve was ever found
Page No:
pp.250-256
Poem Title:
The Cyclops. Theocritus Idyll. 11th. ... To Dr. Short.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Duke of Cambridge
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
Fly swift ye hours ye sluggish minutes fly
Page No:
pp.257-259
Poem Title:
To Caelia.
Attribution:
By Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
What Greece when learning flourished only knew
Page No:
pp.260-262
Poem Title:
Prologue, To the University of Oxon. Spoken by Mr. Hart, at the Acting of the Silent Woman
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
No poor Dutch peasant winged with all his fear
Page No:
pp.262-264
Poem Title:
Epilogue, Spoken by the same. [i.e. Mr. Hart]
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Poets your subjects have their parts assigned
Page No:
pp.264-266
Poem Title:
Prologue, to the University of Oxford, 1674. Spoken by Mr. Hart.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Oft has our poet wished this happy seat
Page No:
pp.266-268
Poem Title:
Epilogue spoken at Oxford by Mrs. Marshall.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Discord and plots which have undone our age
Page No:
pp.268-269
Poem Title:
Prologue to the University of Oxford.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Though actors cannot much of learning boast
Page No:
pp.270-272
Poem Title:
Prologue To The University of Oxford.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thespis the first professor of our art
Page No:
pp.272-273
Poem Title:
The Prologue at Oxford, 1680.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
To say this comedy pleased long ago
Page No:
pp.273-276
Poem Title:
The Prologue to Albumazar
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
With sickly actors and an old house too
Page No:
pp.276-277
Poem Title:
Prologue to Aviragus Reviv'd: Spoken by Mr. Hart.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
So shipwrecked passengers escape to land
Page No:
pp.277-279
Poem Title:
Prologue spoken the first day of the King's House Acting after the Fire.
Attribution:
Writ by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Where none of you gallants ever driven so hard
Page No:
pp.279-280
Poem Title:
Prologue for the Women, when they Acted at the Old Theatre in Lincolns-Inn-Fields.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A plain built house after so long a stay
Page No:
pp.281-284
Poem Title:
A Prologue Spoken at the opening of the New House, March 26. 1674.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Though what our prologue said was sadly true
Page No:
pp.284-286
Poem Title:
Epilogue by the same Author.
Attribution:
by the same Author [i.e. Dryden]
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Were you but half so wise as you are severe
Page No:
pp.286-287
Poem Title:
An Epilogue.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
We act by fits and starts like drowning men
Page No:
pp.288-289
Poem Title:
An Epilogue for the King's House.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Ladies I hope there's none behind to hear
Page No:
pp.290-291
Poem Title:
Prologue to the Princess of Cleves.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
A qualm of conscience brings me back again
Page No:
pp.291-293
Poem Title:
Epilogue to the Princess of Cleves.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thou equal partner of the royal bed
Page No:
pp.293-294
Poem Title:
Spoken, To the Queen in Trinity-College New-Court in Cambridge.
Attribution:
Written by Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
Tell me my Thyrsis tell thy Damon why
Page No:
pp.295-301
Poem Title:
Floriana, A Pastoral upon the Death of her Grace the Dutchess of Southampton.
Attribution:
By Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
On a bank beside a willow
Page No:
pp.301-302
Poem Title:
The Tears of Amynta, for the Death of Damon. ... Song.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
But neither Median groves whose happy soil
Page No:
pp.303-306
Poem Title:
The Praises of Italy out of Virgil's Second Georgic.
Attribution:
By Mr. Chetwood.
Attributed To:
Knightly Chetwood
First Line:
Verses immortal as my bays I sing
Page No:
pp.306-310
Poem Title:
The Ninth Ode of the Fourth Book of Horace.
Attribution:
By Mr. Stepney.
Attributed To:
George Stepney
First Line:
Then this unwieldy factious town
Page No:
pp.310-312
Poem Title:
Hor. Ode 15. Lib. 2. Imitated.
Attribution:
By Mr. Chetwood.
Attributed To:
Knightly Chetwood
First Line:
In storms when clouds the moon do hide
Page No:
pp.313-315
Poem Title:
The Sixteenth Ode Of The Second Book Of Horace.
Attribution:
By Mr. Otway.
Attributed To:
Thomas Otway
First Line:
Then you Mecenas with your train
Page No:
pp.316-318
Poem Title:
The First Epode Of Horace.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As Jupiter I made my court in vain
Page No:
pp.319-320
Poem Title:
Epilogue intended to have been spoken by the Lady Henr. Mar. Wentworth when Calisto was acted at Court.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
In peaceful shades which aged oaks diffuse
Page No:
pp.323-330
Poem Title:
The First Eclogue.
Attribution:
By John Caryll, Esq;
Attributed To:
John Caryll
First Line:
A hopeless flame did Corydon destroy
Page No:
pp.331-335
Poem Title:
The Second Eclogue.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Tate.
Attributed To:
Nahum Tate
First Line:
Young Corydon hard fate an humble swain
Page No:
pp.336-340
Poem Title:
The Second Eclogue.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Tell me Dametas tell whose sheep these are
Page No:
pp.341-349
Poem Title:
The Thrid [sic] Eclogue. Or Palemon.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Creech.
Attributed To:
Thomas Creech
First Line:
Sicilian muse begin a loftier strain
Page No:
pp.350-354
Poem Title:
The Fourth Eclogue. Pollio.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Mopsus since chance does us together bring
Page No:
pp.355-362
Poem Title:
The Fifth Eclogue. Daphnis.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Duke.
Attributed To:
Richard Duke
First Line:
I first of Romans stooped to rural strains
Page No:
pp.363-369
Poem Title:
The Sixth Eclogue. Silenus.
Attribution:
Englished by the Earl of Roscomon.
Attributed To:
Wentworth Dillon
First Line:
While Daphnis sat beneath a whispering shade
Page No:
pp.373-377
Poem Title:
The Seventh Eclogue.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Adams.
Attributed To:
Thomas Adams
First Line:
Sad Damon's and Alphesiboeus muse
Page No:
pp.378-384
Poem Title:
The Eighth Eclogue. Pharmaceutria.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Stafford.
Attributed To:
Mr. Stafford
First Line:
I Damon and Alpheus loves recite
Page No:
pp.384-389
Poem Title:
The same Eclogue
Attribution:
By Mr. Chetwood.
Attributed To:
Knightly Chetwood
First Line:
Ho Moeris whither on thy way so fast
Page No:
pp.390-395
Poem Title:
The Ninth Eclogue.
Attribution:
By Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Sicilian nymph assist my mournful strains
Page No:
pp.396-401
Poem Title:
The Tenth Eclogue. Gallus.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. Stafford.
Attributed To:
Mr. Stafford
First Line:
One labour more O Arethusa yield
Page No:
pp.402-407
Poem Title:
The Last Eclogue, Translated, or rather Imitated, in the Year 1666.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
From thence his way the Trojan hero bent
Page No:
pp.1-7
Poem Title:
The entire Episode of Nisus and Euryalus, translated from the 5th. and 9th. Books of Virgils Aeneids. [First Part]
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The Trojan camp the common danger shared
Page No:
pp.8-31
Poem Title:
The entire Episode of Nisus and Euryalus, translated from the 5th. and 9th. Books of Virgils Aeneids. [Second Part]
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thus equal deaths are dealt and equal chance
Page No:
pp.32-47
Poem Title:
The entire Episode of Mezentius and Lausus, translated out of the 10th. Book of Virgils Aeneids
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now night with sable wings the world overspread
Page No:
pp.48-51
Poem Title:
The Speech Of Venus To Vulcan: Wherein she perswades him to make Arms for her Son Aeneas, then engag'd in a War against the Latines, and King Turnus: Translated out of the Eighth Book of Virgils Aeneids.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Delight of human kind and gods above
Page No:
pp.52-55
Poem Title:
Lucretius The beginning of the First Book.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Tis pleasant safely to behold from shore
Page No:
pp.56-59
Poem Title:
Lucretius The beginning of the Second Book.
Attribution:
Translated by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
What has this bugbear death to frighten man
Page No:
pp.60-79
Poem Title:
Translation Of The Latter Part of the Third Book Of Lucretius, Against the Fear of Death.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thus therefore he who feels the fiery dart
Page No:
pp.80-97
Poem Title:
Lucretius The Fourth Book. Concerning the Nature of Love; Beginning at this Line, Sic igitur, Veneris qui telis accipit ictum, &c.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Thus like a sailor by the tempest hurled
Page No:
pp.98-99
Poem Title:
From Lucretius Book the Fifth.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Twelve Spartan virgins noble young and fair
Page No:
pp.100-106
Poem Title:
Theocrit. Idyllium the 18th. The Epithalamium Of Helen and Menelaus.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
With inauspicious love a wretched swain
Page No:
pp.107-113
Poem Title:
Idyllium the 23d. The Despairing Lover.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
The shepherd Paris bore the Spartan bride
Page No:
pp.114-123
Poem Title:
Daphnis. From Theocritus Idyll. 27.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
So may the auspicious queen of love
Page No:
pp.124-127
Poem Title:
Horat. Ode 3. Lib. I. Inscrib'd to the Earl of Roscomon, on his intended Voyage to Ireland.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Behold yon mountain's hoary height
Page No:
pp.128-126 [i.e. 128-130]
Poem Title:
Horace Lib. I. Ode 9.
Attribution:
by an unknown hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Descended of an ancient line
Page No:
pp.127-134 [i.e. 131-138]
Poem Title:
Horat. Ode 29. Book 3. Paraphras'd in Pindarique Verse; And Inscrib'd to the Right Honourable Lawrence Earl of Rochester.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
How happy in his low degree
Page No:
pp.135-159 [i.e. 139-144]
Poem Title:
From Horace, Epod. 2d.
Attribution:
by Mr. Dryden.
Attributed To:
John Dryden
First Line:
Now scorching Sirius burnt the thirsty moors
Page No:
pp.145-154
Poem Title:
Part of Virgils 4th. Georgick.
Attribution:
Englished by an unknown Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Oft I by wine have tried to lull my cares
Page No:
pp.155-158
Poem Title:
The Sixth Elegy Of the First Book of Tibullus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Twas night and lazy sleep my eyes confined
Page No:
pp.158-161
Poem Title:
Ovid's Dream.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
A pox who'd be a poet in our days
Page No:
pp.162-165
Poem Title:
A Prologue Intended for the Duke and no Duke.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Ah friend the posting years how fast they fly
Page No:
pp.166-168
Poem Title:
The Fourteenth Ode Of the Second Book of Horace.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Goatherd the music of yon whistling pine
Page No:
pp.353-366
Poem Title:
The First Idyllium Of Theocritus, Translated into English.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Are you grown lazy or does some disease
Page No:
pp.367-372
Poem Title:
The Reapers. The Tenth Idyllium Of Theocritus.
Attribution:
Englished by Mr. William Bowles, of King's College in Cambridge.
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
Scarce three whole days my lovely youth had passed
Page No:
pp.373-377
Poem Title:
[Greek]. Or The Twelfth Idyllium Of Theocritus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Cupid the sliest rogue alive
Page No:
pp.378-379
Poem Title:
[Greek]: Or The Nineteenth Idyllium Of Theocritus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
There on the extremest beach and farthest sand
Page No:
pp.380-387
Poem Title:
The Complaint of Ariadna. Out Of Catullus.
Attribution:
by Mr. William Bowles.
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
Proud Eunica when I advanced to kiss
Page No:
pp.388-392
Poem Title:
The Twentieth Idyllium Of Theocritus.
Attribution:
by Mr. William Bowles.
Attributed To:
William Bowles
First Line:
Let's live my dearest Lesbia and love
Page No:
pp.392-393
Poem Title:
To Lesbia. Out Of Catullus.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
My Lesbia swears she would Catullus wed
Page No:
p.394
Poem Title:
To Lesbia.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
If pleasure follows when we think upon
Page No:
pp.399-396 [i.e. 395-396]
Poem Title:
To Lesbia. A Petition to be freed from Love.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I'm now at --- where my eyes can view
Page No:
pp.395-402 [i.e. 399-402]
Poem Title:
Lib. II. Elegy XVI. He invites his Mistress into the Countrey.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Now Ceres' feast is come the trees are blown
Page No:
pp.402-405
Poem Title:
Lib. III. Elegy IX.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Since earth and water more dilated air
Page No:
pp.406-417
Poem Title:
Of Natures Changes. From Lucretius. Lib. V.
Attribution:
By a Person of Quality.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Winter's dissolved behold a world's new face
Page No:
pp.418-420
Poem Title:
Horace, Ode 7th, Book 4th.
Attribution:
By an unknown Hand.
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
We must all live and we would all live well
Page No:
pp.420-423
Poem Title:
Horace, The 2d Book, Ode the 10th.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Dear friend for surely I may call him so
Page No:
pp.423-436
Poem Title:
Horace, 18th Epistle, the 1st Book
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
I was at first a piece of fig tree wood
Page No:
pp.436-441
Poem Title:
Horace, Saty. 2. Lib. I.
Attribution:
By Mr. Stafford.
Attributed To:
John Stafford
First Line:
All blots I cannot from my manners wipe
Page No:
pp.441-444
Poem Title:
Ovid. Amorum. Lib. 2. El. 4. That he loves Women of all sorts and sizes.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Condemned to Pontus tired with endless toil
Page No:
pp.444-448
Poem Title:
Elegy (II.) Lib. 5. De Trist. Ovid complains of his three years Banishment.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Arise great monarch see the joyful day
Page No:
pp.449-452
Poem Title:
An Ode. Sung before the King on New-Years-Day.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Of all heaven's judgments that was sure the worst
Page No:
pp.452-456
Poem Title:
Upon the late Ingenious Translation of Pere Simon's Critical History, By H. D. Lsq; [sic]
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Sylvia the fair in the bloom of fifteen
Page No:
pp.464-466
Poem Title:
A New Song.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
Go tell Amynta gentle swain
Page No:
pp.467-468
Poem Title:
Song.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
On the remains of an old blasted oak
Page No:
pp.468-474
Poem Title:
On the Death of Mr. Oldham.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
As soon as mild Augustus could assuage
Page No:
pp.475-480
Poem Title:
On the Kings-House Now Building at Winchester.
Attribution:
Attributed To:
Not attributed
First Line:
On death and wounds Camilla looks with joy
Page No:
pp.481-494
Poem Title:
The Episode Of the Death of Camilla Translated out of the Eleventh Book of Virgils Aeneids
Attribution:
By Mr. Stafford.
Attributed To:
John Stafford